Duration of meditation practice?

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

How long have you maintained your current meditation practice without lapse (ie, a break of 4 days)?

I don't have a meditation practice
2
13%
Up to one week
0
No votes
Up to two weeks
0
No votes
Up to one month
2
13%
Up to two months
1
7%
Up to four months
2
13%
Up to six months
0
No votes
Up to eight months
0
No votes
Up to ten months
0
No votes
One year or more
8
53%
 
Total votes : 15

Duration of meditation practice?

Postby Reductor » Fri Mar 19, 2010 6:42 am

It seems that meditation is widely practiced in the Buddhist community, but I am not sure just how long those meditation practices are maintained before they lapse. Hence the poll. I've defined a lapse as 4 days, because that is just over half of the smallest increment listed in this poll. Of course you are free to define lapse to however many days you like.

I would welcome any elaboration you might have on your practice, including but not limited: to your technique, difficulties, tips on overcoming those difficulties, pleasant benefits you ascribe to your meditation practice (both while in meditation and in daily life).

Oh, and you can change your vote at any time.

Thank you anyone that participates.
Last edited by Reductor on Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Duration of meditation practice?

Postby Ben » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:10 am

Hi thereductor

Its actually been many years since I've had a lapse of four days or longer.
I think the experiential reality for many people is that in the first few years, one's practice oscillates like a pendulum. Some people have breaks.
I think its natural that people oscillate in the beginning. Practicing Dhamma can be deeply confrontational and challenging. Intensity of practice seems to be accompanied by difficulties associated with dealing with one's sankharas and kilesas.

If you miss a session - just accept it and make an effort to rearrange things in your daily life so that meditation is maintained.
In the past, in order to accomodate the needs of a young family, I have scheduled my meditation after everyone has gone to bed and again before they got up in the morning.
The other thing that I advise is to maintain your precepts and try to practice right livelihood. These, when practiced, make the maintenance of meditation practice easier.
Kind regards

Ben
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Re: Duration of meditation practice?

Postby retrofuturist » Fri Mar 19, 2010 7:15 am

Greetings,

My meditation practice isn't structured enough to answer your question.

I meditated for an hour today, but it wasn't part of some regular schedule.

Whether I get to formally meditate on a day-to-day is often dependent on factors beyond my control, usually relating to work, family or weather.

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Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


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One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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