Viewing images of Corpses online

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

Re: Viewing images of Corpses online

Postby jcsuperstar » Wed Jul 07, 2010 9:46 am

Annapurna wrote:
jcsuperstar wrote:interesting i've fasted many times, sometimes for long periods and it never did anything to diminish my sex drive.


That doesn't mean it's not true for others.

oh thanks i guess i should go back and edit the part of my post where i said it did
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Re: Viewing images of Corpses online

Postby retrofuturist » Wed Jul 07, 2010 9:54 am

Greetings,

Annapurna wrote:
jcsuperstar wrote:interesting i've fasted many times, sometimes for long periods and it never did anything to diminish my sex drive.

That doesn't mean it's not true for others.

That doesn't mean it's Theravada meditation, either.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Viewing images of Corpses online

Postby Sanghamitta » Wed Jul 07, 2010 10:15 am

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings,

Annapurna wrote:
jcsuperstar wrote:interesting i've fasted many times, sometimes for long periods and it never did anything to diminish my sex drive.

That doesn't mean it's not true for others.

That doesn't mean it's Theravada meditation, either.

Metta,
Retro. :)

While there is no doubt that cemetery/ corpse contemplation is. And has been since the time of the Buddha.
The Tibetans take it much further, They have are a whole series of practices. Some of which involve sitting on a corpse and using it as a meditation cushion.
In the Theravada contemplation of corpses has always been a supervised but common practice.
The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.
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Re: Viewing images of Corpses online

Postby cooran » Wed Jul 07, 2010 7:21 pm

Sanghamitta said: While there is no doubt that cemetery/ corpse contemplation is. And has been since the time of the Buddha.


"Furthermore, the monk reflects on this very body from the soles of the feet on up, from the crown of the head on down, surrounded by skin and full of various kinds of unclean things: 'In this body there are head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, large intestines, small intestines, gorge, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, skin-oil, saliva, mucus, fluid in the joints, urine.' Just as if a sack with openings at both ends were full of various kinds of grain — wheat, rice, mung beans, kidney beans, sesame seeds, husked rice — and a man with good eyesight, pouring it out, were to reflect, 'This is wheat. This is rice. These are mung beans. These are kidney beans. These are sesame seeds. This is husked rice'; in the same way, the monk reflects on this very body from the soles of the feet on up, from the crown of the head on down, surrounded by skin and full of various kinds of unclean things: 'In this body there are head hairs, body hairs, nails, teeth, skin, flesh, tendons, bones, bone marrow, kidneys, heart, liver, pleura, spleen, lungs, large intestines, small intestines, gorge, feces, bile, phlegm, pus, blood, sweat, fat, tears, skin-oil, saliva, mucus, fluid in the joints, urine.' And as he remains thus heedful, ardent, & resolute, any memories & resolves related to the household life are abandoned, and with their abandoning his mind gathers & settles inwardly, grows unified & centered. This is how a monk develops mindfulness immersed in the body.

"Furthermore, the monk contemplates this very body — however it stands, however it is disposed — in terms of properties: 'In this body there is the earth property, the liquid property, the fire property, & the wind property.' Just as a skilled butcher or his apprentice, having killed a cow, would sit at a crossroads cutting it up into pieces, the monk contemplates this very body — however it stands, however it is disposed — in terms of properties: 'In this body there is the earth property, the liquid property, the fire property, & the wind property.' And as he remains thus heedful, ardent, & resolute, any memories & resolves related to the household life are abandoned, and with their abandoning his mind gathers & settles inwardly, grows unified & centered. This is how a monk develops mindfulness immersed in the body.
"Furthermore, as if he were to see a corpse cast away in a charnel ground — one day, two days, three days dead — bloated, livid, & festering, he applies it to this very body, 'This body, too: Such is its nature, such is its future, such its unavoidable fate'...

"Or again, as if he were to see a corpse cast away in a charnel ground, picked at by crows, vultures, & hawks, by dogs, hyenas, & various other creatures... a skeleton smeared with flesh & blood, connected with tendons... a fleshless skeleton smeared with blood, connected with tendons... a skeleton without flesh or blood, connected with tendons... bones detached from their tendons, scattered in all directions — here a hand bone, there a foot bone, here a shin bone, there a thigh bone, here a hip bone, there a back bone, here a rib, there a breast bone, here a shoulder bone, there a neck bone, here a jaw bone, there a tooth, here a skull... the bones whitened, somewhat like the color of shells... piled up, more than a year old... decomposed into a powder: He applies it to this very body, 'This body, too: Such is its nature, such is its future, such its unavoidable fate.'

"And as he remains thus heedful, ardent, & resolute, any memories & resolves related to the household life are abandoned, and with their abandoning his mind gathers & settles inwardly, grows unified & centered. This is how a monk develops mindfulness immersed in the body.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

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---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
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Re: Viewing images of Corpses online

Postby rowyourboat » Thu Jul 08, 2010 10:08 am

I think there is an important distinction here:

'Foulness of the body' (asubha) meditations as well the elements of the body meditation (dhathumanasikara) mainly gets rid of craving to the body- one of our strongest cravings- and something we need special dedicated methods to get rid of.

The '9 stages of decomposition' meditation in a satipatthana (navaseevatika) lead to calm, detached, equanamous mind states from life and the body.

Then Death meditations (maranussati) should lead to urgency of practice.

I find that developing samadhi gives rise to less lustlful thoughts. Sometimes even strong metta. I also find that looking at the whole issue from a biological. evolutionary viewpoint makes a lot of sense. Sex (and behaviours around it) are all geared to women procuring the best materially and genetically well off mates, while men look for the most fertile women. Attraction seem geared to finding the most fertile woman (studies have apparently proved this) and the most resourceful, genetically good man. This allows me to step back from what I am attracted to because that is just my body trying to make babies....which I dont want.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physical_attractiveness

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