Satisfying the mind

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

Satisfying the mind

Postby Agmanellium » Fri Sep 24, 2010 6:38 pm

What is meant by satisfying the mind? How do you interpret this, and how to you achieve this satisfaction?
User avatar
Agmanellium
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 6:21 pm

Re: Satisfying the mind

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Sep 24, 2010 6:44 pm

Agmanellium wrote:What is meant by satisfying the mind? How do you interpret this, and how to you achieve this satisfaction?
In what context is this expression used?
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19555
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: Satisfying the mind

Postby Agmanellium » Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:12 pm

Within the four frames of reference, the third frame.
Breathing in sensitive to the mind, breathing out sensitive to the mind.
Breathing in satisfying the mind, breathing out satisfying the mind.
Breathing in steadying the mind, breathing out steadying the mind.
Breathing in releasing the mind, breathing out releasing the mind.
User avatar
Agmanellium
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 6:21 pm

Re: Satisfying the mind

Postby bodom » Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:28 pm

I take it to refer to the pleasurable feelings that arise during deepening levels of concentration ie. access and absorption.

From Ledi Sayadaw (Based on Visuddhimagga explanation):

When the perception of the mind is extremely clear, making the mind extremely delighted, by entering the first and second jhānas (which are associated with rapture) repeatedly is “delighting the mind."


http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Ledi/Anapa ... hirdTetrad

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
User avatar
bodom
 
Posts: 4612
Joined: Fri Jan 09, 2009 6:18 pm
Location: San Antonio, Texas

Re: Satisfying the mind

Postby Agmanellium » Fri Sep 24, 2010 7:38 pm

I have taken it as meaning that the mind roams when dissatisfied. In order to steady the mind one must often allow those thoughts connected with stress, connected with the world, to play themselves out, if not finding a solution, at least letting that thought scream itself out until it has nothing new to say and no longer can hold the interest of the mind.
User avatar
Agmanellium
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Fri Sep 24, 2010 6:21 pm

Re: Satisfying the mind

Postby IanAnd » Fri Sep 24, 2010 10:22 pm

Agmanellium wrote:I have taken it as meaning that the mind roams when dissatisfied. In order to steady the mind one must often allow those thoughts connected with stress, connected with the world, to play themselves out, if not finding a solution, at least letting that thought scream itself out until it has nothing new to say and no longer can hold the interest of the mind.

That works. Within the context of learning how to quiet and still the mind, how to "put away covetousness and grief for the world." I've used it myself in the same way as you describe. It may take a few minutes, or it may consume the whole of the meditation session. Either way, it's all good if the end result is that the mind becomes still and able to concentrate more fully on the object of meditation.

After one is able to still the mind's exploration of such worldly concerns, then the answer that Bodom mentioned is the correct direction to go in if you wish to experience deeper levels of calm. This is where things can get really interesting regarding the profundity of the calm and concentration which develops.
"The gift of truth exceeds all other gifts" — Dhammapada, v. 354 Craving XXIV
User avatar
IanAnd
 
Posts: 399
Joined: Mon Oct 19, 2009 5:19 am
Location: the deserts of Arizona

Re: Satisfying the mind

Postby rowyourboat » Sat Sep 25, 2010 10:16 am

Kimattha Sutta: What is the Purpose?
translated from the Pali by
Thanissaro Bhikkhu
© 1997–2009
I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Then Ven. Ananda went to the Blessed One and on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: "What is the purpose of skillful virtues? What is their reward?"

"Skillful virtues have freedom from remorse as their purpose, Ananda, and freedom from remorse as their reward."

"And what is the purpose of freedom from remorse? What is its reward?"

"Freedom from remorse has joy as its purpose, joy as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of joy? What is its reward?"

"Joy has rapture as its purpose, rapture as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of rapture? What is its reward?"

"Rapture has serenity as its purpose, serenity as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of serenity? What is its reward?"

"Serenity has pleasure as its purpose, pleasure as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of pleasure? What is its reward?"

"Pleasure has concentration as its purpose, concentration as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of concentration? What is its reward?"

"Concentration has knowledge & vision of things as they actually are as its purpose, knowledge & vision of things as they actually are as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of knowledge & vision of things as they actually are? What is its reward?"

"Knowledge & vision of things as they actually are has disenchantment as its purpose, disenchantment as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of disenchantment? What is its reward?"

"Disenchantment has dispassion as its purpose, dispassion as its reward."

"And what is the purpose of dispassion? What is its reward?"

"Dispassion has knowledge & vision of release as its purpose, knowledge & vision of release as its reward.

"Thus in this way, Ananda, skillful virtues have freedom from remorse as their purpose, freedom from remorse as their reward. Freedom from remorse has joy as its purpose, joy as its reward. Joy has rapture as its purpose, rapture as its reward. Rapture has serenity as its purpose, serenity as its reward. Serenity has pleasure as its purpose, pleasure as its reward. Pleasure has concentration as its purpose, concentration as its reward. Concentration has knowledge & vision of things as they actually are as its purpose, knowledge & vision of things as they actually are as its reward. Knowledge & vision of things as they actually are has disenchantment as its purpose, disenchantment as its reward. Disenchantment has dispassion as its purpose, dispassion as its reward. Dispassion has knowledge & vision of release as its purpose, knowledge & vision of release as its reward.

"In this way, Ananda, skillful virtues lead step-by-step to the consummation of arahantship."
With Metta

Karuna
Mudita
& Upekkha
rowyourboat
 
Posts: 1949
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:29 pm
Location: London, UK


Return to Theravada Meditation

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests