Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Buddhist ethical conduct including the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).
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Cittasanto
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby Cittasanto » Mon Feb 06, 2012 8:53 am

hom many of the survivalists here know it is easier to get flora than fauna? or which is and isn't edible?

there was a 'famine' in Sweden years ago and there was plenty of food, just no one knew what was edible from the land, so now there is still a program teaching people what is. well that is what my brothers Swedish wife told me!

EDIT - I remember that there is also eating natural death, animals who have died from natural causes or by accident, I have been told and I may of misunderstood, that in Sri Lanka meat from a natural death is actually more expensive? possibly because it is not associated with any black Kamma


He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

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Spiny O'Norman
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Mon Feb 06, 2012 9:45 am


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Fede
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby Fede » Mon Feb 06, 2012 10:19 am

"Samsara: The human condition's heartbreaking inability to sustain contentment." Elizabeth Gilbert, 'Eat, Pray, Love'.

Simplify: 17 into 1 WILL go: Mindfulness!

Quieta movere magna merces videbatur. (Sallust, c.86-c.35 BC)
Translation: Just to stir things up seemed a good reward in itself. ;)

I am sooooo happy - How on earth could I be otherwise?! :D


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hermitwin
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby hermitwin » Mon Feb 06, 2012 4:51 pm


Bankei
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby Bankei » Thu Feb 09, 2012 11:03 am

-----------------------
Bankei

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Sam Vara
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby Sam Vara » Thu Feb 09, 2012 11:30 am

What is the point of these hypothetical questions?

My answer is that they are a very common way in which some educated people conceive of ethics and test out various scenarios to do with morals. The British philosopher Philippa Foot and what became known as "Trolleyology" is a good example. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trolley_problem

Some people are irritated by this type of approach, but then again many people who have been educated in a particular way have this type of mind-set. They value rules and consistency and the ability to deal with counter-factuals. I don't aspire to this type of ability, but I can see its beauty and utility, and it seems to me to be every bit as useful in itself as the ability to cultivate certain types of faith, for example.

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Fede
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby Fede » Thu Feb 09, 2012 12:36 pm

"Samsara: The human condition's heartbreaking inability to sustain contentment." Elizabeth Gilbert, 'Eat, Pray, Love'.

Simplify: 17 into 1 WILL go: Mindfulness!

Quieta movere magna merces videbatur. (Sallust, c.86-c.35 BC)
Translation: Just to stir things up seemed a good reward in itself. ;)

I am sooooo happy - How on earth could I be otherwise?! :D


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thisisanoldrule
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby thisisanoldrule » Tue Feb 21, 2012 5:52 pm

Haha, Fede your answer made me laugh.

... I am somewhat uncomfortable with knowing that it's possible I might go see a transplant doctor for a checkup who'd feel tempted to carve me up to save the other 4 people on the table :weep:

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LonesomeYogurt
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Re: Can killing be acceptable in Buddhism?

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Thu Feb 23, 2012 5:22 pm

To kill another animal in order to survive would be done out of clinging to your own life. Instead, why not sit down and meditate on your hunger while realizing the impermanence of living? You could become enlightened right then and there on that island if you confronted your fear and desire instead of breaking a precept in order to stave it off. The bhikkhu Godhika slit his own throat while meditating in order to achieve Nibbana. I think there are far more important things in Buddhism than just keeping yourself alive, even if you aren't enlightened. To place compassion towards a rat over your grasping to your own body would move you ten thousand times further towards dispassion and the mind of an Arahant than giving in to killing in order to escape and go on living.

With that said, I would never imagine criticizing someone who killed an animal in this situation; to not do so would take incredible spiritual development. I'm certain that if I was in that situation, I could not get a rat into my belly fast enough. But that's because of my own clinging and grasping and I'm sure it's not what a Buddha would do.
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta



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