The consequence for using intoxicants

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Training of Sila, the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).

Re: The consequence for using intoxicants

Postby clw_uk » Tue May 05, 2009 9:39 pm

Greetings

Does anyone know if the Buddha give any adivce on how to overcome desire for alcohol (and other substances)?

Ive had trouble with drink and drugs in the past and was wondering if there is any kind of meditation or recollection that helps with overcoming desire for them, since i still get very strong cravings for them that still effects me from time to time that doesnt seem to go away

Im aware of the numerous discourses that stress the draw backs of sensual pleasure but is there any kind of direct contemplation? or are there even modern teachings that deal with it?


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Last edited by clw_uk on Tue May 05, 2009 10:08 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The consequence for using intoxicants

Postby Cittasanto » Tue May 05, 2009 10:01 pm

Without looking for it there is a sutta where the Buddha advises a king I think it was to use Mindfulness to overcome his overeating.

clw_uk wrote:Greetings

Does anyone know if the Buddha give any adivce on how to overcome desire for alcohol (and other substances)?

Ive had trouble with drink and drugs in the past and was wondering if there is any kind of meditation or recollection that helps with overcoming desire for them, since i still get very strong cravings for them that still effects me from time to time

Im aware of the numerous discourses that stress the draw backs of sensual pleasure but is there any kind of direct contemplation? or are there even modern teachings that deal with it?


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Re: The consequence for using intoxicants

Postby clw_uk » Tue May 05, 2009 10:29 pm

Thanks Manapa :smile:


On a further note, is smoking considered a breaking of the 5th precept?


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Re: The consequence for using intoxicants

Postby retrofuturist » Tue May 05, 2009 10:55 pm

Greetings Craig,

No, it's not.

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If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


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One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: The consequence for using intoxicants

Postby Nibbida » Wed May 06, 2009 3:04 am

clw_uk wrote:Greetings
Im aware of the numerous discourses that stress the draw backs of sensual pleasure but is there any kind of direct contemplation? or are there even modern teachings that deal with it?


Yes, the strategy is to apply mindfulness and equanimity to the urges, watching them arise and pass. G. Alan Marlatt is a psychologist who specializes in addiction treatment. He's also a Buddhist and applied Buddhist techniques to addiction treatment. He calls it "urge surfing" where you watch the cravings rise and pass like a wave. Look him up on the internet. He calls his program "Mindfulness Based Relapse Prevention" which is based on Kabat-Zinn's MBSR, but adapted for addictions.

Marlatt is doing studies of incarcerated prisoners with addiction, giving them intense 10-day Goenka-style retreats. The studies so far shows that they do better than other prisoners who get the usual treatment.

Here's another nice, short article that describes the same idea:

http://www.shinzen.org/shinsub3/artUrges.pdf
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