Right Livelihood

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Training of Sila, the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).

Right Livelihood

Postby MartinH » Fri Jun 08, 2012 2:34 pm

Hi, I have a question on right livelihood and would like to hear others thoughts on this. I am currently working as a licensed bartender selling alcohol. I think this is a big no no as far as occupations go in buddhism. I am however leaving this role and going back to my old job role working in a betting shop where you have a mix of recreational gamblers and a few compulsive gamblers. Is this another big problem? I don't gamble my self.

Thanks for your thought
Martin
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Re: Right Livelihood

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Jun 08, 2012 4:19 pm

The Buddha's teachings assist us in overcoming greed and attachments to things such as ego and extreme viewpoints. Addictions are to be avoided of any kind. While it is certainly possible to become addicted to gambling, it can be just as easy to become addicted to many other things, including compulsive behaviors and viewpoints.

It is specifically mentioned in the discourses of Buddha, Digha Nikaya, Sigalaka Sutta, number 31, that lay people should not waste their money and one way of wasting money is described as addiction to gambling. The discourse does not prohibit gambling or entertainment, just the addiction to it.

Gambling (Dhamma Wiki article)
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Re: Right Livelihood

Postby hermitwin » Fri Jun 08, 2012 5:19 pm

dear martin, there are many different jobs out there, why limit
yourself to these 2?
trust me, you can earn a living doing something that is
within right livelihood.
buddha advise us to associate with the wise.
find a job where you find wise people.
it would be much better than serving people who seek solace in
alcohol and gambling.
its your choice, and yes you have many choices.
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Re: Right Livelihood

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Fri Jun 08, 2012 6:31 pm

MartinH wrote:Hi, I have a question on right livelihood and would like to hear others thoughts on this. I am currently working as a licensed bartender selling alcohol. I think this is a big no no as far as occupations go in buddhism. I am however leaving this role and going back to my old job role working in a betting shop where you have a mix of recreational gamblers and a few compulsive gamblers. Is this another big problem? I don't gamble my self.

Thanks for your thought
Martin

It's certainly better than selling alcohol. So long as you take steps to make sure that those who are compulsive or self-destructive have their desires curbed, then I would say it's permissible but definitely not blameless.
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.
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Re: Right Livelihood

Postby jason c » Fri Jun 08, 2012 10:24 pm

MartinH wrote:Hi, I have a question on right livelihood and would like to hear others thoughts on this. I am currently working as a licensed bartender selling alcohol. I think this is a big no no as far as occupations go in buddhism. I am however leaving this role and going back to my old job role working in a betting shop where you have a mix of recreational gamblers and a few compulsive gamblers. Is this another big problem? I don't gamble my self.

Thanks for your thought
Martin


this depends on where you are in your meditative practice, it is good to observe 5 precepts and start a meditative practice. as your practice deepens, you may find you are distracted by thoughts relating to your career. if this is the case , then you can look at other career possibilities.
metta,
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