Climate change is a profound moral concern for Buddhists

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Training of Sila, the Five Precepts (Pañcasikkhāpada), and Eightfold Ethical Conduct (Aṭṭhasīla).

Re: Climate change is a profound moral concern for Buddhists

Postby waterchan » Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:52 pm

alan wrote:Maybe you meant renunciation of sensual pleasures?

Nibbida actually means becoming disenchanted and disgusted with conditioned phenomena (which obviously includes sensual pleasures), but I thought "renunciation" was a more appropriate euphemism in a sensitive topic like this...
quidquid Latine dictum sit altum videtur
(Anything in Latin sounds profound.)
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Re: Climate change is a profound moral concern for Buddhists

Postby SarathW » Fri Jul 25, 2014 10:58 pm

Every time we try to solve a problem we create a new one!

To solve the climate change some are trying to use a carbon tax.
Who are the people benefit from the carbon tax? Who is going to suffer?
Will that save the world?
There are groups always waiting to monetise (make money) from even a good cause.
:shrug:
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Re: Climate change is a profound moral concern for Buddhists

Postby alan » Fri Jul 25, 2014 11:02 pm

Detached, or dispassionate maybe, and at the higher realms of Jhana.
But I'm no Pali scholar. Maybe someone else has a better understanding of Nibbida, and how it is used in reference to renunciation.
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Re: Climate change is a profound moral concern for Buddhists

Postby Kim OHara » Sat Jul 26, 2014 3:05 am

SarathW wrote:To solve the climate change some are trying to use a carbon tax.
Who are the people benefit from the carbon tax?

Nearly everyone, in the long term, since we will have a more liveable world in fifty years' time.
SarathW wrote:Who is going to suffer?

Fossil fuel producers and heavy users (e.g. power companies). Rich people, mostly.
If it is implemented properly, everyone else will only suffer a little and for a short time.
SarathW wrote:Will that save the world?

Not by itself but it will sure help. It's one of the key solutions.
And we need all the help we can get.

:namaste:
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Re: Climate change is a profound moral concern for Buddhists

Postby David N. Snyder » Sat Jul 26, 2014 4:47 am

Perhaps there is a middle way between the positions expressed here. One could have concern about global warming without being too involved with the cause by engaging in some basic and easy solutions. For example:

1. Using less electricity, putting the heater or cooler to efficient levels (for example, not trying to cool your house or apartment to 65 F [18 Cel.] degrees but rather to a more normal reasonable level). I know some people who really do try to get their place that cool even here in Las Vegas where temperatures exceed 109 (43 Cel.) on some days.
2. Reducing unnecessary driving or trips and using fuel efficient vehicles, such as hybrid cars, electric, etc.
3. Recycling paper, cardboard, cans, bottles, etc. In most places there are bins for this where you can place these things at your curb or in your neighborhood without much difficulty at all.
4. Voting for candidates to political office who are aware of the issues and solutions.

There are a number of other solutions that we can do, but the above doesn't interfere with our everyday life much and still allows one to engage in Dhamma study and practice.
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Re: Climate change is a profound moral concern for Buddhists

Postby Kim OHara » Sat Jul 26, 2014 8:27 am

:goodpost:
and its beginning and ending apply to most social issues.
That is, we should look for a middle way between giving our whole lives to the cause (whatever it may be) and ignoring the cause completely to focus on dhamma practice.
In fact, we do do exactly that already.
Look at your life.
Now, how much of your time last week did you spend on ...
Looking after neighbours?
Revegetating degraded riverbanks?
Helping immigrants integrate into your community?
Meditation?
Caring for injured wildlife?
Advocating on behalf of disadvantaged youth?
Sutta study?
Fundraising for Greenpeace?

There's your measure of involvement. And they are all worthwhile causes.

:juggling:
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