judgment-free awareness

Discussion of Satipatthana bhavanā and Vipassana bhavana.

Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby fivebells » Thu Dec 12, 2013 5:15 pm

tiltbillings wrote:What the Ajahns are talking about is a mature practice.


I think this is the heart of the controversy. In terms of virtue and concentration, Bahiya's practice was already extremely advanced and the concerns he raises at the start of the Sutta suggest some relatively minor holes in his discernment. The practice the Buddha recommends to him shouldn't be attempted without solid foundational skills in virtue and concentration, and there are better and worse ways to develop those skills so judgement of better and worse is useful at earlier stages of the path. Maybe I'm just listening to too much Thanissaro, though. :)
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby Anagarika » Thu Dec 12, 2013 7:06 pm

I've appreciated what Ven. Thanissaro has said about the secular concept of mindfulness as "nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment." I think he's tried to impart the idea that samma sati does involve active memory, and some measure of active evaluation or judgment to allow the present moment awareness to be useful or productive toward elimination of defilements. I feel that when folks in the secular mindfulness community discuss this 'nonjudgmental awareness', it may have more to do with nonreactivity to arising thoughts, vs nonjudgments or nonevaluation, unless the intent is really to develop absolute nonresponse to these products of mind. This nonreactivity may have a beneficial effect, but may do little to help eradicate the root causes of the greedy, angry, traumatic or deluded thought. To me, this is what separates staring at a wall for five hours and watching things come and go, from doing the active work of calming the mind and cultivating insight as to the arising of these causes and conditions of suffering. Maybe what I'm saying has more to do with semantics than anything, but such a difference exists between secular sati and samma sati, and some need for this distinction to be discussed.
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Dec 12, 2013 8:10 pm

fivebells wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:What the Ajahns are talking about is a mature practice.


I think this is the heart of the controversy. In terms of virtue and concentration, Bahiya's practice was already extremely advanced and the concerns he raises at the start of the Sutta suggest some relatively minor holes in his discernment. The practice the Buddha recommends to him shouldn't be attempted without solid foundational skills in virtue and concentration, and there are better and worse ways to develop those skills so judgement of better and worse is useful at earlier stages of the path. Maybe I'm just listening to too much Thanissaro, though. :)
I have no idea of what you mean here.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Dec 12, 2013 8:19 pm

BuddhaSoup wrote:I've appreciated what Ven. Thanissaro has said about the secular concept of mindfulness as "nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment." I think he's tried to impart the idea that samma sati does involve active memory, and some measure of active evaluation or judgment to allow the present moment awareness to be useful or productive toward elimination of defilements. I feel that when folks in the secular mindfulness community discuss this 'nonjudgmental awareness', it may have more to do with nonreactivity to arising thoughts, vs nonjudgments or nonevaluation, unless the intent is really to develop absolute nonresponse to these products of mind. This nonreactivity may have a beneficial effect, but may do little to help eradicate the root causes of the greedy, angry, traumatic or deluded thought. To me, this is what separates staring at a wall for five hours and watching things come and go, from doing the active work of calming the mind and cultivating insight as to the arising of these causes and conditions of suffering. Maybe what I'm saying has more to do with semantics than anything, but such a difference exists between secular sati and samma sati, and some need for this distinction to be discussed.
" ...may do little to help eradicate the root causes of the greedy..." So, basically the purpose of meditation practice is to get a perception that you can then think about as a way of gaining insight into it.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby kmath » Thu Dec 12, 2013 10:19 pm

BuddhaSoup wrote:I've appreciated what Ven. Thanissaro has said about the secular concept of mindfulness as "nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment." I think he's tried to impart the idea that samma sati does involve active memory, and some measure of active evaluation or judgment to allow the present moment awareness to be useful or productive toward elimination of defilements. I feel that when folks in the secular mindfulness community discuss this 'nonjudgmental awareness', it may have more to do with nonreactivity to arising thoughts, vs nonjudgments or nonevaluation, unless the intent is really to develop absolute nonresponse to these products of mind. This nonreactivity may have a beneficial effect, but may do little to help eradicate the root causes of the greedy, angry, traumatic or deluded thought. To me, this is what separates staring at a wall for five hours and watching things come and go, from doing the active work of calming the mind and cultivating insight as to the arising of these causes and conditions of suffering. Maybe what I'm saying has more to do with semantics than anything, but such a difference exists between secular sati and samma sati, and some need for this distinction to be discussed.


Agreed. :goodpost:
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby retrofuturist » Thu Dec 12, 2013 10:23 pm

Greetings,

BuddhaSoup wrote:I've appreciated what Ven. Thanissaro has said about the secular concept of mindfulness as "nonjudgmental awareness of the present moment." I think he's tried to impart the idea that samma sati does involve active memory, and some measure of active evaluation or judgment to allow the present moment awareness to be useful or productive toward elimination of defilements. I feel that when folks in the secular mindfulness community discuss this 'nonjudgmental awareness', it may have more to do with nonreactivity to arising thoughts, vs nonjudgments or nonevaluation, unless the intent is really to develop absolute nonresponse to these products of mind. This nonreactivity may have a beneficial effect, but may do little to help eradicate the root causes of the greedy, angry, traumatic or deluded thought. To me, this is what separates staring at a wall for five hours and watching things come and go, from doing the active work of calming the mind and cultivating insight as to the arising of these causes and conditions of suffering. Maybe what I'm saying has more to do with semantics than anything, but such a difference exists between secular sati and samma sati, and some need for this distinction to be discussed.


Agreed. :goodpost:

tiltbillings wrote:" ...may do little to help eradicate the root causes of the greedy..." So, basically the purpose of meditation practice is to get a perception that you can then think about as a way of gaining insight into it.

AN 10.60: Girimananda Sutta wrote:"And what is the perception of inconstancy? There is the case where a monk — having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building — reflects thus: 'Form is inconstant, feeling is inconstant, perception is inconstant, fabrications are inconstant, consciousness is inconstant.' Thus he remains focused on inconstancy with regard to the five clinging-aggregates. This, Ananda, is called the perception of inconstancy.

"And what is the perception of not-self? There is the case where a monk — having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building — reflects thus: 'The eye is not-self, forms are not-self; the ear is not-self, sounds are not-self; the nose is not-self, aromas are not-self; the tongue is not-self, flavors are not-self; the body is not-self, tactile sensations are not-self; the intellect is not-self, ideas are not-self.' Thus he remains focused on not-selfness with regard to the six inner & outer sense media. This is called the perception of not-self.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby fivebells » Thu Dec 12, 2013 10:50 pm

tiltbillings wrote:
fivebells wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:What the Ajahns are talking about is a mature practice.


I think this is the heart of the controversy.
I have no idea of what you mean here.


Assuming that's the part which doesn't make sense, I meant the argument that's been going on in this thread about the place judgement-free awareness in Buddhist practice.
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby manas » Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:39 am

David N. Snyder wrote:Good quote by Ajahn Chah. It needs to be understood in context because it can easily be misinterpreted. Ajahn Brahm gave a similar teaching one day at his center. A father and his son were attending the talk. The next day the father asked his son to take the garbage out or some other simple task. The son replied, "I am only in judgment-free awareness, in the present." When asked about his homework or any other task, the son replied the same.


That's fine...when the son began to wonder, asking why the laundry was no longer magically doing itself, or why the Internet was suddenly no longer working, I would have then replied "why get stressed about it? Just reside in judgement-free awareness..."

_/I\_
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Dec 13, 2013 9:55 am

manas wrote:
David N. Snyder wrote:Good quote by Ajahn Chah. It needs to be understood in context because it can easily be misinterpreted. Ajahn Brahm gave a similar teaching one day at his center. A father and his son were attending the talk. The next day the father asked his son to take the garbage out or some other simple task. The son replied, "I am only in judgment-free awareness, in the present." When asked about his homework or any other task, the son replied the same.


That's fine...when the son began to wonder, asking why the laundry was no longer magically doing itself, or why the Internet was suddenly no longer working, I would have then replied "why get stressed about it? Just reside in judgement-free awareness..."

_/I\_
Context is everything.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby manas » Fri Dec 13, 2013 10:09 am

tiltbillings wrote:Context is everything.


I hasten to add that my jest was aimed at the idea of using a profound spiritual teaching to get out of doing one's duties, and was not aimed at the profound teaching itself. :anjali:

But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle.


That is quite beautifully put.

kind regards,
manas.
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby Mkoll » Fri Dec 13, 2013 10:56 am

tiltbillings wrote:Context is everything.

And this is another important shortcoming of secular mindfulness practice. It is virtually divorced from the other important parts of Buddhism, that of virtue and wisdom. Sure, the teachers may give the Buddha's teachings some lip service but it is minimal at best and downright distorted at worst. NB that this is just my experience.

It's like removing the bran and germ from whole wheat berries when turning them into white flour.
Peace,
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby bodom » Fri Dec 13, 2013 3:34 pm

From Analayo's Satipatthana Sutta Commentary:

CHARACTERISTICS AND FUNCTIONS OF SATI

A close examination of the instructions in the Satipatthäna Sutta reveals that the meditator is never instructed to interfere actively with what happens in the mind. If a mental hindrance arises, for example, the task of satipatthana contemplation is to know that the hindrance is present, to know what has led to its arising, and to know what will lead to its disappearance. A more active intervention is no longer the domain of satipatthana, but belongs rather to the province of right effort (samma vayama).


The need to distinguish clearly between a first stage of observation and a second stage of taking action is, according to the Buddha, an essential feature of his way of teaching. The simple reason for this approach is that only the preliminary step of calmly assessing a situation without immediately reacting enables one to undertake the appropriate action.

Thus, although sati furnishes the necessary information for a wise deployment of right effort, and will monitor the countermeasures by noting if these are excessive or deficient, sati nevertheless

Uninvolved and detached receptivity as one of the crucial characteristics of sati forms an important aspect in the teachings of several modern meditation teachers and scholars. They emphasize that the purpose of sati is solely to make things conscious, not to eliminate them. Sati silently observes, like a spectator at a play, without in any way interfering. Some refer to this non-reactive feature of sati as "choiceless" awareness.'" "Choiceless" in the sense that with such awareness one remains impartially aware, without reacting with likes or dislikes. Such silent and non-reactive observation can at times suffice to curb unwholesomeness, so that an application of sati can have quite active consequences. Yet sati's activity is confined to detached observation. That is, sati does not change experience, it deepens it.

This non-interfering quality of sati is required to enable one clearly to observe the building up of reactions and their underlying motives. As soon as one becomes in any way involved in a reaction, the detached observational vantage point is immediately lost. The detached receptivity of sati enables one to step back from the situation at hand and thereby to become an unbiased observer of one's subjective involvement and of the entire situation.' This detached distance allows for a more objective perspective, a characteristic illustrated in the above-mentioned simile of climbing a tower.

This detached but receptive stance of satipatthana constitutes a "middle path", since it avoids the two extremes of suppression and reaction. The receptivity of sati, in the absence of both suppression and reaction, allows personal shortcomings and unjustified reactions to unfold before the watchful stance of the meditator, without being suppressed by the affective investment inherent in one's self-image. Maintaining the presence of sati in this way is closely related to the ability to tolerate a high degree of "cognitive dissonance", since the witnessing of one's own shortcomings ordinarily leads to unconscious attempts at reducing the resulting feeling of discomfort by avoiding or even altering the perceived information.

This shift towards a more objective and uninvolved perspective introduces an important element of sobriety into self-observation. The element of "sobriety" inherent in the presence of sati comes up in an entertaining canonical description of a particular celestial realm, whose divine inhabitants get so "intoxicated" with sensual indulgence that they lose all sati. As a consequence of being without sati, they fall from their elevated celestial position and are reborn in a lower realm.6~ The reverse case is also documented in another discourse, in which negligent monks, reborn in an inferior celestial realm, on regaining their sati are at once able to ascend to a higher realm. Both these instances point to the edifying power of sati and its wholesome repercussions.

Sati as a mental quality is closely related to attention (manasikara), a basic function which, according to the Abhidhaminic analysis, is present in any kind of mental state. This basic faculty of ordinary attention characterizes the initial split seconds of bare cognizing of an object, before one begins to recognize, identify, and conceptualize. Sati can be understood as a further development and temporal extension of this type of attention, thereby adding clarity and depth to the usually much too short fraction of time occupied by bare attention in the perceptual process. The resemblance in function between sati and attention is also reflected in the fact that wise attention (yoniso manasikara) parallels several aspects of satipatthäna contemplation, such as directing attention to antidotes for the hindrances, becoming aware of the impermanent nature of the aggregates or of the sense-pleasures, establishing the awakening factors, and contemplating the four noble truths.

This "bare attention" aspect of sati has an intriguing potential, since it is capable of leading to a "de-automatization" of mental mechanisms. Through bare sati one is able to see things just as they are, unadulterated by habitual reactions and projections. By bringing the perceptual process into the full light of awareness, one becomes conscious of automatic and habitual responses to perceptual data. Full awareness of these automatic responses is the necessary preliminary step to changing detrimental mental habits.

Sati as bare attention is particularly relevant to restraint at the sense doors (indriya sarnvara). In this aspect of the gradual path, the practitioner is encouraged to retain bare sati in regard to all sense-input. Through the simple presence of undisrupted and bare mindfulness, the mind is "restrained" from amplifying and proliferating the received information in various ways. This guardianship role of sati in relation to sense-input is alluded to in those similes that declare satipatthana to be the proper "pasture" for a meditator and which compare sati to the gatekeeper of a town.

According to the discourses, the purpose of restraining the senses is to avoid the arising of desires (abhijjha) and discontent (domanassa). Such freedom from desires and discontent is also an aspect of satipatthana contemplation, mentioned in the "definition" part of the discourse. Thus the absence of reactions under the influence of desires and discontent is a common feature of both satipaffhana and sense-restraint. This goes to show that there is a considerable degree of overlap between these two activities.

To sum up, sati entails an alert but receptive equanimous observation. Viewed from the context of actual practice, a predominantly receptive sati is then enlivened by the quality of being diligent (ätapi), and supported by a foundation in concentration (samadhi).


http://www.wisdom-books.com/ProductExtr ... ?PID=17023

:anjali:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Dec 13, 2013 3:42 pm

Mkoll wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:Context is everything.

And this is another important shortcoming of secular mindfulness practice. It is virtually divorced from the other important parts of Buddhism, that of virtue and wisdom. Sure, the teachers may give the Buddha's teachings some lip service but it is minimal at best and downright distorted at worst. NB that this is just my experience.

It's like removing the bran and germ from whole wheat berries when turning them into white flour.
We are not talking about 'secular mindfulness practice" here.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Dec 13, 2013 3:47 pm

retrofuturist wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:" ...may do little to help eradicate the root causes of the greedy..." So, basically the purpose of meditation practice is to get a perception that you can then think about as a way of gaining insight into it.

AN 10.60: Girimananda Sutta wrote:"And what is the perception of inconstancy? There is the case where a monk — having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building — reflects thus: 'Form is inconstant, feeling is inconstant, perception is inconstant, fabrications are inconstant, consciousness is inconstant.' Thus he remains focused on inconstancy with regard to the five clinging-aggregates. This, Ananda, is called the perception of inconstancy.

"And what is the perception of not-self? There is the case where a monk — having gone to the wilderness, to the shade of a tree, or to an empty building — reflects thus: 'The eye is not-self, forms are not-self; the ear is not-self, sounds are not-self; the nose is not-self, aromas are not-self; the tongue is not-self, flavors are not-self; the body is not-self, tactile sensations are not-self; the intellect is not-self, ideas are not-self.' Thus he remains focused on not-selfness with regard to the six inner & outer sense media. This is called the perception of not-self.
One can do that, and it has its place, but there is also simply directly seeing these things without the medium conceptual thinking, and it is that which is the transformative, freeing insight.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby daverupa » Fri Dec 13, 2013 3:56 pm

Thus, although sati furnishes the necessary information for a wise deployment of right effort, and will monitor the countermeasures by noting if these are excessive or deficient, sati nevertheless remains an aloof quality of uninvolved, detached observation. Sati can interact with other, much more active factors of the mind, yet by itself it does not interfere.

Uninvolved and detached receptivity...


Mind the gap.

:heart:
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Dec 13, 2013 4:36 pm

daverupa wrote:
Thus, although sati furnishes the necessary information for a wise deployment of right effort, and will monitor the countermeasures by noting if these are excessive or deficient, sati nevertheless remains an aloof quality of uninvolved, detached observation. Sati can interact with other, much more active factors of the mind, yet by itself it does not interfere.

Uninvolved and detached receptivity...


Mind the gap.

:heart:
This is a quote? If so, please cite its source.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby daverupa » Fri Dec 13, 2013 4:37 pm

tiltbillings wrote:
daverupa wrote:
Thus, although sati furnishes the necessary information for a wise deployment of right effort, and will monitor the countermeasures by noting if these are excessive or deficient, sati nevertheless remains an aloof quality of uninvolved, detached observation. Sati can interact with other, much more active factors of the mind, yet by itself it does not interfere.

Uninvolved and detached receptivity...


Mind the gap.

:heart:
This is a quote? If so, please cite its source.


Apologies - I've provided it since it's missing from the earlier quote given by bodom.
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Dec 13, 2013 5:13 pm

daverupa wrote:
Apologies - I've provided it since it's missing from the earlier quote given by bodom.
And to add what is missing from your quote:

    Sati can interact with other, much more active factors of the mind, yet by
    itself it does not interfere.

    Uninvolved and detached receptivity as one of the crucial characteristics
    of sati forms an important aspect in the teachings of several
    modern meditation teachers and scholars. They emphasize that
    the purpose of sati is solely to make things conscious, not to eliminate
    them. Sati silently observes,like a spectator at a play, without in
    any way interfering. Some refer to this non-reactive feature of sati as
    "choiceless" awareness. "Choiceless" in the sense that with such
    awareness one remains impartially aware, without reacting with
    likes or dislikes. Such silent and non-reactive observation can at
    times suffice to curb unwholesomeness, so that an application of sati
    can have quite active consequences. Yet sati's activity is confined to
    detached observation. That is, sati does not change experience, it
    deepens it.

    This non-interfering quality of sati is required to enable one clearly
    to observe the building up of reactions and their underlying
    motives. As soon as one becomes in any way involved in a reaction,
    the detached observational vantage point is immediately lost. The
    detached receptivity of sati enables one to step back from the situation
    at hand and thereby to become an unbiased observer of one's
    subjective involvement and of the entire situation. This detached
    distance allows for a more objective perspective, a characteristic
    illustrated in the above-mentioned simile of climbing a tower.

    This detached but receptive stance of satipatthiina constitutes a
    "middle path", since it avoids the two extremes of suppression and
    reaction." The receptivity of sati, in the absence of both suppression
    and reaction, allows personal shortcomings and unjustified reactions
    to unfold before the watchful stance of the meditator, without
    being suppressed by the affective investment inherent in one's
    self-image. Maintaining the presence of sati in this way is closely related
    to the ability to tolerate a high degree of "cognitive dissonance",
    since the witnessing of one's own shortcomings ordinarily
    leads to unconscious attempts at reducing the resulting feeling of
    discomfort by avoiding or even altering the perceived information.

    This shift towards a more objective and uninvolved perspective
    introduces an important element of sobriety into self-observation.
    The element of "sobriety" inherent in the presence of sati comes up
    in an entertaining canonical description of a particular celestial
    realm, whose divine inhabitants get so "intoxicated" with sensual
    indulgence that they lose all sati. As a consequence of being without
    sati, they fall from their elevated celestial position and are reborn in
    a lower realm. The reverse case is also documented in another discourse,
    in which negligent monks, reborn in an inferior celestial realm, on regaining
    their sati are at once able to ascend to a higher realm. Both these instances
    point to the edifying power of sati and its wholesome repercussions.

    Sati as a mental quality is closely related to attention (manasikiira),
    a basic function which, according to the Abhidhammic analysis, is
    present in any kind of mental state. This basic faculty of ordinary
    attention characterizes the initial split seconds of bare cognizing of
    an object, before one begins to recognize, identify, and conceptualize.
    Sati can be understood as a further development and temporal
    extension of this type of attention, thereby adding clarity and depth
    to the usually much too short fraction of time occupied by bare attention
    in the perceptual process. The resemblance in function between
    sati and attention is also reflected in the fact that wise
    attention (yoniso manasikiira) parallels several aspects of satipaithiina
    contemplation, such as directing attention to antidotes for the
    hindrances, becoming aware of the impermanent nature of the
    aggregates or of the sense-spheres, establishing the awakening factors,
    and contemplating the four noble truths.

    This "bare attention" aspect of sati has an intriguing potential,
    since it is capable of leading to a "de-automatization" of mental
    mechanisms." Through bare sati one is able to see things just as they
    are, unadulterated by habitual reactions and projections. By bringing
    the perceptual process into the full light of awareness, one becomes
    conscious of automatic and habitual responses to perceptual
    data. Full awareness of these automatic responses is the necessary
    preliminary step to changing detrimental mental habits.

    Sati as bare attention is particularly relevant to restraint at the
    sense doors (indriya samvara). In this aspect of the gradual path, the
    practitioner is encouraged to retain bare sati in regard to all sense-input.
    Through the simple presence of undisrupted and bare mindfulness,
    the mind is "restrained" from amplifying and proliferating
    the received information in various ways. This guardianship role of
    sati in relation to sense-input is alluded to in those similes that declare
    saiipaithana to be the proper "pasture" for a meditator and
    which compare sati to the gatekeeper of a town.

    According to the discourses, the purpose of restraining the senses
    is to avoid the arising of desires (abhijjha) and discontent
    (domanassa). Such freedom from desires and discontent is also an aspect
    of satipaiihiina contemplation, mentioned in the "definition"
    part of the discourse. Thus the absence of reactions under the influence
    of desires and discontent is a common feature of both satipaithana
    and sense-restraint. This goes to show that there is a
    considerable degree of overlap between these two activities.

    To sum up, sati entails an alert but receptive equanimous observation.
    Viewed from the context of actual practice, a predominantly
    receptive sati is then enlivened by the quality of being diligent
    (atapi), and supported by a foundation in concentration (samadhi).
    Analayo SATIPATTHANA, pages 58-61.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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tiltbillings
 
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby daverupa » Fri Dec 13, 2013 5:27 pm

tiltbillings wrote:
daverupa wrote:
Apologies - I've provided it since it's missing from the earlier quote given by bodom.
And to add what is missing from your quote:


Hmm... but that was already posted just a little bit ago... minus the purple bits, of course... now we finally have the whole thing, but also two posts that are inadequate and wordy... plus all this meta.

Sorry about all this.
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]
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Re: judgment-free awareness

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Dec 13, 2013 5:34 pm

daverupa wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:
daverupa wrote:
Apologies - I've provided it since it's missing from the earlier quote given by bodom.
And to add what is missing from your quote:


Hmm... but that was already posted just a little bit ago... minus the purple bits, of course... now we finally have the whole thing, but also two posts that are inadequate and wordy... plus all this meta.

Sorry about all this.
No need to be sorry. Analayo's wordy words are still worth reading, and those who don't like his stuff and who don't like reading long texts won't read it anyway.

(In looking again at Bodom's msg, I knew I should have stayed in bed longer. I did not catch the Bodom's quote was an edited version of what it in the book. You are quite correct, it is a bit repetitive. I simply did have bit I quoted in PDF. Oh, well. I see a nap in my future.)
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19550
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

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