Vipassana taught by the Buddha

Discussion of Satipatthana bhavanā and Vipassana bhavana.

Re: Vipassana taught by the Buddha

Postby starter » Wed Jun 27, 2012 9:12 pm

Hi thanks for the input. Anapanasati is for developing the 4 mindfulness (mindfulness of body/feeling/mind/Dhamma) ["... mindfulness of in-&-out breathing is developed & pursued so as to bring the four frames of reference to their culmination"]. I tend to think the 4 tetrads can all be used for Vipassana to penetrate the anicca nature of body/feeling/mind/Dhamma, or bodily & mental formations. The penetration of the four (not only one) is needed for gaining insight on the anicca/dukkha/anatta nature of the five aggregates (body, feeling, and mind which includes perception, volitional formation and consciousness aggregates).

Yesterday at another forum I read a question concerning being mindful of body (or feeling or mind or Dhamma) alone can fulfill the mindfulness enlightenment factor and subsequently the other 6 enlightenment factors, which can bring clear knowing & release to their culmination, then why we need to practice all the 4 mindfulness ["This is how the four frames of reference are developed & pursued so as to bring the seven factors for awakening to their culmination" - MN 118]. The phrasing (or translation?) of MN 118 about this part is indeed a bit confusing. But I believe we definitely need to develop all the 4 mindfulness instead of only one, as mentioned above.

Metta to all,

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Re: Vipassana taught by the Buddha

Postby pegembara » Thu Jun 28, 2012 6:41 am

Yesterday at another forum I read a question concerning being mindful of body (or feeling or mind or Dhamma) alone can fulfill the mindfulness enlightenment factor and subsequently the other 6 enlightenment factors, which can bring clear knowing & release to their culmination, then why we need to practice all the 4 mindfulness ["This is how the four frames of reference are developed & pursued so as to bring the seven factors for awakening to their culmination" - MN 118]. The phrasing (or translation?) of MN 118 about this part is indeed a bit confusing. But I believe we definitely need to develop all the 4 mindfulness instead of only one, as mentioned above.


Surely one has to be mindful of every object that makes an appearance. Being mindful of only some frames of references means that many objects will be missed. Such degree of mindfulness surely lacks power to adequately train the mind. Besides one doesn't get to "choose" what comes up.
And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech.
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Re: Vipassana taught by the Buddha

Postby starter » Sun Jun 15, 2014 4:26 pm

Greetings!

Today I heard The Fire Sermon, and learned to apply the teaching to the all (the six sense sets and five aggregates) by seeing them all burning with suffering. I hope I can always remember to see the all burning with suffering to grow disenchanted with them, like the one thousand monks when heard the teaching and became liberated.

Metta to all!

SN 35.28 Adittapariyaya Sutta: The Fire Sermon

"Bhikkhus, all is burning. And what is the all that is burning?

"The eye is burning, forms are burning, eye-consciousness is burning, eye-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises with eye-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant—that too is burning (so is perception and volition). Burning with what? Burning with the fire of lust, with the fire of hate, with the fire of delusion; burning with birth, aging and death; with sorrows, lamentations, pains, griefs, and despairs, I say.

"The ear is burning, sounds are burning, ear-consciousness is burning, ear-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises with ear-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant—that too is burning (so is perception and volition). Burning with what? Burning with the fire of lust, with the fire of hate, with the fire of delusion; burning with birth, aging and death; with sorrows, lamentations, pains, griefs, and despairs, I say.

"The nose is burning, odors are burning, nose-consciousness is burning, nose-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises with nose-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant—that too is burning. Burning with what? Burning with the fire of lust, with the fire of hate, with the fire of delusion; burning with birth, aging and death; with sorrows, lamentations, pains, griefs, and despairs, I say....

"The tongue is burning, flavors are burning, tongue-consciousness is burning, tongue-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises with tongue-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant—that too is burning (so is perception and volition). Burning with what? Burning with the fire of lust, with the fire of hate, with the fire of delusion; burning with birth, aging and death; with sorrows, lamentations, pains, griefs, and despairs, I say.

"The body is burning, tangibles are burning, body-consciousness is burning, body-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises with eye-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant—that too is burning (so is perception and volition). Burning with what? Burning with the fire of lust, with the fire of hate, with the fire of delusion; burning with birth, aging and death; with sorrows, lamentations, pains, griefs, and despairs, I say.

"The mind is burning, mental objects are burning, mind-consciousness is burning, mind-contact is burning, and whatever feeling arises with mind-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant—that too is burning. Burning with what? Burning with the fire of lust, with the fire of hate, with the fire of delusion; burning with birth, aging and death; with sorrows, lamentations, pains, griefs, and despairs, I say.

"Seeing thus, the well-instructed noble disciple grows disenchanted with the eye, disenchanted with forms, disenchanted with consciousness at the eye, disenchanted with contact at the eye. And whatever feeling arises with eye-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant: with that, too, he grows disenchanted.

"He grows disenchanted with the ear...

"He grows disenchanted with the nose...

"He grows disenchanted with the tongue...

"He grows disenchanted with the body...

"He grows disenchanted with the mind, disenchanted with mental objects, disenchanted with mind-consciousness, disenchanted with mind-contact. And whatever feeling arises with mind-contact as condition—whether pleasant or painful or neither-painful-nor-pleasant: with that, too, he grows disenchanted.

Disenchanted, he becomes dispassionate. Through dispassion, his mind is fully liberated. When liberated there comes the knowledge: ‘It’s liberated.’ He understands: ‘Destroyed is birth, the holy life has been lived, what had to be done has been done, there is no more for this state of being.’”

This is what the Supreme One said. Gratified, those bhikkhus delighted in the Supreme One’s words. And while this discourse was being spoken, the minds of the thousand bhikkhus were liberated from the taints by clinging no more."

(The "translation" is synthesized from various available versions.)
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