Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

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Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Thu Dec 16, 2010 7:06 am

from the bookTeaching Dhamma by Pictures
Explanation of a Siamese Traditional Buddhist Manuscript
by Ven. Buddhadasa Bhikkhu

Published by
Sathirakoses-Nagaparadi Foundation & Ministry of Education, Thailand
On the occassion of the Centenary Celebration of the Bith of the Ven. Buddhadasa Bhikku
(27 May 1906 - 27 May 2006)


Image

Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

The use of pictures as a method for explaining the Dhamma (Buddhist Teachings) has been popular in Siam since the Sukhothai or early Ayuthia period. The manner of representation has undergone, of course, various changes throught the years so that the pictures illustrate period art as well as Dhamma. Though there is still disagreement in fixing the date of some illustrations, the examples presented here are of the Bangkok period (about 100 years old). Three illustrated manuscripts of this period on Dhamma have been found in the town of Chaiya (Surathani Province) and the volume presented here is the largest of them. Upon examination, it was found that all three manuscripts have the same theme for their illustrations.

The illustrated manuscript reproduced here was, in the original, a traditional Thai manuscript called Samut Khoi which is a long roll of paper folded concertian-wise into leaves and then written on both sides. In this form, the illustration was presented first, followed by a few lines of explanation on a particular aspect of Dhamma such as Meditation and so forth. Cambodian script was used in those days for all religious work thought the language is Siamese.

The pigments used were produced locally, most of them derived from native trees. The sequence of the illustrations has been rearranged here, for a more lucid presentation.


Note: The book was reprinted for free distribution from „The Corporate Body of the Buddha Education Foundation“ and is under http://www.budaedu.org avaliable.


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A german version is avaliable on dhamma-vinaya.de - if not available on this forum please try here: santinanda.de
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1. THE SIX ELEMENTS

Image

This is an illustration of the six Elements. Four human figures paying respect to the king represent the Four Great Elements: Earth, Water, Fire and Air. (Or of Solidity, Cohesion, Temperature and Mobility, which are the marks of all matter.) The fifth element, Space, surrounds the others. The king is a representation of the sixth element, Vinnanadhatu, the Consciousness-element. The king (or the mind) is shown as superior to and in control of the other four (Earth, Water, Fire, Air) elements which represent corporeality. Space should be regarded as beyond, and distinct from, the mind (nama) and body (rupa) elements, althought some schools of thought regard space as an aspect of mind. According to this latter approach, only two elements are present - mind and body. However, there are also the three elements of rupadhatu, arupadhatu, and nirodhadhatu. Rupadhatu is the element that has form and is composed of corporeal matter. Arupadhatu is formless and abstract, while nirodhadhatu is the cessation of nama (mind) and rupa (body) and is experienced as voidness. The space element should be regarded as nirodhadhatu, and not as rupa or nama. (The last three dhatus or elements, of form, formlessness and cessation, are not abstract ideas but relate to certain experiences won through the practice of calming, concentrating and enriching the mind with wisdom. In the same way, the first four great elements may also be experienced trough mindfulness of the body.)


.
Last edited by Hanzze on Tue Dec 21, 2010 12:55 pm, edited 2 times in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Thu Dec 16, 2010 8:38 am

2. MIND AND BODY

Image

Here the symbolism is also illustrate body and mind. Body is represented by the earth-ware vessels (carried by the man on the left) while mind is shown as the whimsical, swift and restless monkey. (The same symbolism of the monkey representing mind is found in the Lord Buddha‘s discourses (Sutta) as well as in the illustrated Wheel of Wandering-on as seen in Tibetan temples). The monkeys prove themselves adept at avoiding capture and the hunters have difficulty in spearing and shooting these agile creatures. The meaning is that the monkey (mind) is difficult to control. The body, however, is mere earth-ware, and cannot move by itself; it is easily broken and fragile. The combination of these two make up a human being.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Thu Dec 16, 2010 12:53 pm

3. MIND - CONTROL

Image

In this picture, the trees having cavities represent bodies and the snakes depicted here live within these cavities, or, metaphorically, the mind lives in the body. Hence, the snake, a dangerous and poisonous creature representing the mind, should be trained and controlled. One means of control calls for restrain (symbolised by the weapons in the illustration), while at other times one must be indulgent, using kindness as means to ultimate control. In short, both edges of the cut crystal must be used in taming the mind. The symbolism of the mind and the snake should not be taken lightly, both are potentially dangerous (leading one into pain an death. The snake's poison is carving (tanha) which in searching for pleasures and continued existence, is sure to kill one many times unless one takes firm steps to apply the antidote of Dhamma). The two corpses and three minks are a reminder that the mind is governed and subdued and death overcome through meditation.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Fri Dec 17, 2010 3:35 am

4. THE WAY TO ESCAPE FROM THE FIVE AGGREGATES

Image

There is a story here which one should know before studying the picture. A man who is fleeing from five thieves reaches a river where he discovers a floating corpse; he jumpes onto if and crosses the river. Here instead of thieves, five birds have been drawn in the right hand corner and these also represent the five heaps (khandha) or aggregates: material quality (rupa), feeling (vedana), memory (sanna), volition (sankhara) and consciousness (vinnanna). All of these are characterized by grasping (upadana) and are complete analysis of one’s self.

The rotting corpse, used to cross the river, is none other than one’s loathsome and disagreeable body. (One should not suppose that the body in Buddhist Teaching is to be despised, nor are the consequences of doing so (self-torture) ever found in Buddhist Teachings. However, the true nature of the body has to be seen with insight - as it really is and not as one wishes it might be since everyone knows, when they think about it, that it is naturally subject to old age, disease and death.) The corpse however, is still useful in reaching the further shore of Nibbana. The monks, and the laypeople holding lotus blossoms are those who have realized the truth and recognized the danger of the five heaps which constitute a “person” and are no longer attached to them.

subsidiary: Khandha Sutta
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Fri Dec 17, 2010 6:35 am

5. WISDOM SPRUNG OUR OF "THE MUD"

Image

This picture is another symbol of mind and body, or nama and rupa. The body here, is represented as mud beneath the water while the mind is the lotus that springs from the mud. Unlike the loethsomeness of the body, the lotus is fragrant and our. The turbulence of the waters and the fish therein are all the worldly desires which agitate the mind. The man emerging from the lotus is holding a disc and a sword which symbolize the wisdom that cuts off and removes all defilements (kilesa). Defilement here, is represented by the boy approaching the enlightened man who, triumphant, pays no attention. The man in the right-hand corner holding the lotus-fruit has practised meditation and has found the way out of the darkness, having seen for himself the Fruit of Dhamma.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Fri Dec 17, 2010 7:43 am

6. THE THREE KINDS OF CRAVING

Image

In this illustration, an elephant symbolizing all beings, is drawing water from the three ponds of carving, namely: carving for sensual pleasure, for existence and for non-existence. The drinking of ponds represents our indulgence in the three carvings.

subsidiary: Craving - tanha
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Sat Dec 18, 2010 10:39 am

7. DEPENDENT ORIGINATION

Image

7. DEPENDENT ORIGINATION

Here, all beings (the elephant) having consumed the three ponds of craving are consumed by craving, as the elephant is itself gulped down by a small green frog, a symbol of craving (since ordinary frogs can inflate themselves while this one has managed to gorge itself with all the cravings!) The sequence of events illustrates the teaching of Dependent Arising (Paticca-samuppada). The water in the ponds is regarded as sensory contact (phassa) which gives rise to the three feelings (vedana), which in turn leads to craving (tanha). Craving gives rise to grasping (upadana) which leads to existence (bhava) and consequently causes birth (jati).


subsidiary: Paticca-samuppada-vibhanga Sutta: Analysis of Dependent Co-arising
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Annapurna » Sat Dec 18, 2010 11:39 am

Thanks, Hanzze!
http://www.schmuckzauberei.blogspot.com/
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Sat Dec 18, 2010 12:02 pm

8. DEPENDENT ORIGINATION (CONTINUED)

Image

The frog of craving (tanha) is now devoured by a snake (upadana or grasping) which in turn is eaten by a bird (bhava or mental becoming) while the bird perched on the reeds (which are fragile and hollow, being without heartwood as our bodies and without an abiding soul) symbolizes birth (jati). The roots of the reeds are being gnawed by four mice representing birth, old age, sickness and death, which events mark the passing of our lives.


subsidiary: Paticca-samuppada-vibhanga Sutta: Analysis of Dependent Co-arising
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Sat Dec 18, 2010 12:40 pm

9. DEPENDENT ORIGINATION (CONTINUED)

Image

The symbols here are like those of the last picture: the bird having eaten the snake, the snake the frog, the frog the elephant, and the elephant having drained the three ponds of water. This picture, although by a different artist is used here to show a similar thought.


.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby gavesako » Sat Dec 18, 2010 4:59 pm

Interesting image... What is the monk sleeping on -- the Unconscious (anusaya)? But there are kusala dhammas (lotus flowers) surrounding him. Above: It could be a devata bringing relics for him. And yes, he is holding a manuscript (the Dhamma which protects him from the accumulated "anusaya" below, I guess -- Jungian interpretation).
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Sat Dec 18, 2010 7:04 pm

_/\_
Last edited by Hanzze on Sat Jan 15, 2011 10:30 am, edited 1 time in total.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Sun Dec 19, 2010 11:32 am

10. IGNORANCE

Image

This is a representation of ignorance (avijja)* and the method of overcoming it. The man in the middle of the picture straddles a demon, wielding a disc in one hand and a sword in the other. The demon is symbolic of ignorance, while the weapons represent wisdom and signify the victory of wisdom over ignorance. Both corners of the picture show different kinds of ignorance. In the right hand corner, the man feeding a cock indicates his attachment to his possessions and the fact he has become a slave to them.

In the left-hand corner, the man holding a snake and a fishing basket symolizes ignorance by mistaking the snake for a fish. Here a man is mistaking evil for good, or suffering for happiness.



* (Avijja is not well translated as ignorance since this means not knowing at all. But avijja means not knowing properly or completely, knowing mistakenly.)

.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Sun Dec 19, 2010 1:16 pm

11. IGNORANCE AND ITS RESULTS

Image


This picture is divided into two sections, the lower half continuing the theme of ignorance. The lower left-hand picture of a man feeding his chickens shows he has now become servile to his own possessions due to their abundant increase. The right hand corner illustrates the unfruitful practice of fire-worship. (A brahminical practice still used in India as a rite for propitiating the gods. Formerly, also in Siam, brahminical rites and vows (silabbata-paramasa)which is an aspect of ignorance).

The top half of the picture depicts the result of ignorance: a man caught in the wheel of continuous rebirth. The sequence of a man being bitten by a dog, drowning, and confronting a lion, teaches that once caught in the wheel of life, the captive neither realizes the significance, nor the cause of his plight; unsatisfactory experience (dukkha) has become a common part of his life.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Sun Dec 19, 2010 2:50 pm

12. IGNORING THE TRUTH

Image


Here, the boy facing the lion does not fear it because he is not aware of the real danger. The lion represents the defilements of greed, anger, ignorance and lust as well as birth, old age, sickness and death. The young man is incapable of appreciating the danger confronting him because in his ignorance he still clings to the overt sensory perceptions of form, sound, taste, smell, and touch which are the bases for unsatisfactory experience. In contact to this state of ignorance, the figure above does realize life’s perils. Having comprehended these elementary causes, he points them out to the young man who still persists in ignoring the truth.

pursuing here the Avijja Sutta: Ignorance
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Mon Dec 20, 2010 5:29 am

13. FOUR KINDS OF ATTACHMENT

Image


The four snakes in this picture represent four kinds of attachment: kamupadana (grasping arising from sense desires), ditthupadana (grasping at views philosophical and theological), silabbatupadana (grasping at belief in the efficacy of rites and vows), attavadupadana (grasping at belief in a soul theory). Any manner of attachment is, of course, the result of ignorance and like the entwinement of a snake. (It is noteworthy that these four graspings are shown by snakes looped and wound about each other indicating that all the graspings are interrelated. They illustrate very well the sense of being bound by or tied down to the ordinary round of life.)

pursuing here the The Atthaka Vagga
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Mon Dec 20, 2010 9:01 am

14. UNDERSTANDING AND ATTACHMENT

Image


The man standing complacently as if unaware of his danger, (on the left of this picture), is entwined by the four snakes shown in the last illustration. The wise man on the right sits freely in his palace and recognizing them, points to the four kinds of grasping.

(Grasping at belief in the soul or abiding self is the snake which is poised over his head, while in his left hand he grasps at sense-desire. His right hand lays hold of theological and philosophical views while he is hobbled and cannot walk along the Practice-path of Dhamma because the snake of believe in the efficacy of rites and vows has him by the heels.)
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Mon Dec 20, 2010 9:58 am

15. THE WHEEL OF WANDERING-ON

Image


The four men confined in the inner circle represent again the four kinds of grasping, while the six men in the outer circle stand for the five sensory and one mental perception (seeing, smelling, tasting, hearing, touching, and thought). These sense -perceptions are the cause of suffering and entanglement in the Wheel of Wandering-on (in birth-and-death).*

So long as the men do not realize the truth, they cannot escape being trapped. Held captive by misunderstanding their perceptions, men are also subject to birth, old age, sickness and death.




*This is portrayed in great detail in the paintings of the Wheel of Wandering-on originating in India but a tradition now confined to Tibet. Three Wats in Siam now also possess such paintings: Suan Mokkhabalarama in Chaiya, Wat Khao Krailas, Hua Hin, and Wat Bovoranives, Bangkok.

supplemental the The Wheel of Birth and Death by Bhikkhu Khantipalo
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Mon Dec 20, 2010 3:37 pm

16. OCEAN CLOSE TO THE EYES - UNSEEN

Image


The larger circle on the left with four men represent the wheel of birth, old-age, sickness and death. The fish in the smaller circle on the right are symbolic of all beings caught in the Wheel of Wandering-on.

Fish, in their natural habitat of water, do not recognize it as water because their environment has never changed so that they have no basis for comparison. Men too, are not aware of dukkha (unsatisfactoriness) because they know nothing else. Water symbolizes the Ocean of Wandering-on, while the dry land close at hand, is Nibbana that the fish think of approaching, (as men do not think to „approach“ Nibbana which is so „close“ to them).


.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Teaching Dhamma by Pictures

Postby Hanzze » Mon Dec 20, 2010 3:54 pm

17. EFFECT OF IGNORANCE

Image


The top part of the picture shows an elephant caught in the mud of ignorance. The harder the elephant struggles not knowing the correct way to free himself, the deeper he sinks. (This is exactly the same with many people who realize to some extent how they are trapped in their lives but who, as they fail to discern the cause of their troubles, cannot remedy them. The wise man standing nearby is detached from the turmoil and exhorts us to beware of this treacherous mud.) The two men at the bottom, are engaged in sawing through the tree of ignorance. Both of them wear crowns of high station signifying that no matter how high one’s position, one is also subject to ignorance of real condition of samara. Thus attaining freedom is not easy. The wise man, seated at ease, is one who has relized the truth, being detached and free.


.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Hanzze
 
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