Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????

A forum for members who wish to develop a deeper understanding of the Pali Canon and associated Commentaries, which for discussion purposes are both treated as authoritative.

Moderator: Mahavihara moderator

Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????

Postby seniya » Mon Jan 17, 2011 2:23 pm

Hi there, I was looking for English translation of Apadana Pali text and when I'm googling it, I found the translation of first/introductory chapter of Apadana called Buddhapadana at http://www.archive.org/stream/bclawvolu ... 5/mode/2up by Dwijendralal Barua. It cointain 77 verses illustrating the Buddha who created all beauty of all Buddha-realms (= Buddhakhetta?) in his mind and brought all Buddhas, Arahats, dan Pacceka Buddhas from the past and present. They questioned each other about Dhamma etc.

Below is quotation of the translation:

BUDDHAPADANA
THE TRADITION OF THE PREVIOUS EXCELLENT DEEDS OF THE BUDDHA


Translation

1. Now, with a pure mind, attend to .the Tradition of the previous excellent deeds of the Buddhas, the innumerable kings of righteousness, replete with thirty Perfections.

2. To the supreme enlightenment of the best of the Buddhas, to leaders of the world together with their Orders, I bowed down paying homage with joined hands.

3. In the Buddha-realm, as many as are there the numerous jewels, both in the heaven above and on the earth below, I brought all to my mind.

4. There on a silvery ground, I built a palace, many storied, jewelled, raised high to the sky,

5. Having ornamented pillars, well executed, well divided and arranged, costly, a mass of gold, decorated with arched gateways and canopies.

6. The first storey was of lapis lazuli, shining like a bright piece of cloud; there were (the presentations of) lotuses and lilies strewn over in the excellent golden storey.

7. Some (of the storeys) was of corals, some having coral-lustre, some shining red, while others resembling the Indagopaka-colour, illumined the quarters.

8. They had doors, portals and windows well divided and arranged, four net-works of vedikas and a delightful perfumed enclosure.

9. And they were provided with the excellent peaked roofs blue, yellow, red, white and bright black and decorated with seven varieties of jewels.

10. They had (devices of) lotuses of graceful looks, and were beautified by (the figures of) beasts and birds of prey, filled with (the presentations of) planets and stars, and adorned with (those of) the moon and sun.

11. They were covered over with a golden netting joined with the golden tinkling bells, and the lovely golden garlands (on them) sounded musically by the force of the wind.

12. Festoons of banners, raised on them, were made- lovely by various colours crimson, red, yellow and gold-coloured.

13. Diverse, numerous, many hundreds were the slabs, made of silver, of jewels, of rubies, and also of emeralds.

14. The palace was resplendent with various beds, and covered with soft Benares fabrics, rugs, silk made of the Dukula-fibre, China cloth, fine cloth, fibrous garments, whitish garments, and all this manifold covering I spread out there in my mind.

15. Adorned with jewelled peaked roofs in different storeys (the palace) stood firm, bearing torches shining like gems.

16. The wooden posts and pillars and the beautiful golden gates, made of gold brought from the Jambu river, of excellent (adra) wood, and also of silver, shone forth.

17. Divided and arranged into .many breaks 5 and resplendent with doors and cross-bars (the palace had) on both sides many full vases filled with red, white and blue lotuses.

18. All the Buddhas of the past, the leaders of the world, together with their Orders and disciples, I created in their natural beauty and appearance.

19. Entering by that entrance, all the Buddhas together with their disciples - the circle of the elect - sat down on golden seats.

20. The pre-eminent Buddhas that are now in the world, those of the past and present, I brought them all into the mansion.

21. Many hundreds of Paccekabuddhas, self-enlightened and invincible, those of the past and present, I brought them all into the mansion.

22. Many wishing trees, divine and earthly, there were; I procured all garments and covered (them each) with three robes.

23. Filling the beautiful jewelled bowls, I offered (them) ready-made food, hard and soft, eatable and savoury, as well as drink and meal.

24. Procuring divine garments, I provided them with robes of fine cloth; I entertained the whole circle of the elect with best food and (the four) sweet drinks of sugar, oil, honey and molasses.

25. Entering the jewelled chamber, they, like lions lying down in caves, lay down in a lion's posture on costly beds.

26. Mindful they rose and sat down cross-legged; they gave themselves up to delight in meditation on the way of all the Buddhas.

27. Some preached the doctrines, some sported by their supernormal power, some who had gained mastery over and developed the higher psychic perception, applied themselves to it, while others numbering many hundred thousands worked transformations of themselves by their supernormal power.

28. The Buddhas, too, questioned (other) Buddhas on points relating to omniscience, and comprehended by their knowledge matters, deep and subtle,

29. The disciples questioned the Buddhas, the Buddhas questioned the disciples; they questioned each other, to each other did they explain.

30. The Buddhas, the Paccekabuddhas, the disciples and attendants, enjoying thus their delightful pursuits, rejoiced at the palace.

31. 'May they hold over head (each) an umbrella, embroidered with gold and silver nets and gems, and fringed with nets of pearls !

32. May there be awnings, resplendent with golden stars, variegated, and having flower-wreaths spread over (them) ; may they all hold them over head !

33. Be (the palace) laid out with wreaths of flowers, fragrant with rows of perfumes, strewn over with festoons of garments, and bedecked with strings of jewels !

34. Be it strewn over with flowers, much variegated, incensed with sweet perfumes, marked with five-finger marks of perfumes, and covered over with a golden covering.

35. On four sides, be the tanks covered over with lotuses red and white and blue ; be that these having lotus-pollens coming out, appear in golden hue !

36. All trees be blossomed around the palace, and let them drooping themselves sprinkle perfutoed flowers over the mansion.

37. Let the crested (peacocks) dance there, divine swans utter melodious sounds. Let the Karavika birds, too, sing out and the flocks of birds be on all sides .

38. Let all drums be sounded, all lutes be played. Let all varieties of music go on around the palace.

39. As far as the Buddha-realm, and above the horizons of the world, magnificent, lustrous, faultless and jewelled,

40. Let the golden divans be; let candlesticks be lighted, and the ten thousand (worlds) in succession be of one lustre.

41. Let also courtesans, dancers and celestial nymphs dance, and various theatres be staged around the palace.

42. On tree-tops, mountain-tops, or on the summit of the Sineru mountain, let me raise all manners of banners, variegated and five-coloured.

43. Let men, Nagas, Gandhabbas and gods, all approach them paying homage with joined hands, and surround the palace.'

44. Whatever good deed done, ought to be done, or intended to be done by me, I did it well by body, speech and mind in (the abode of) the Thirty.

45. 'The beings who are conscious or unconscious, let all share in the result of the meritorious deed done by me.

46. To (them) whom the result of the meritorious deed done by me has been offered, it is (thus) made well known. And to those who do not know of it, the gods should go and report.

47. In the whole world, the beings that live but for the sake of food, let them obtain all manners of agreeable food by my heart's wish'

48. Mentally I offered the gift, mentally I brought the palace. I did homage to all the supreme Buddhas, Paccekas and disciples of the conquerors.

49. By that meritorious deed, will and resolve, I. abandoning the human body, went up to the Thirty-three.

50. I have come to know (only) of the two existences, divine and human; no other destiny have I experienced this is the fulfilment of my mental wish.

51. I have been superior to the gods, I have become the lord of men. Endowed with beauty and appearance, I am incomparable in the world in respect of wisdom.

52. Food of various kinds and best, jewels not inadequate, and garments of all fashions come to me quickly from above (lit. the sky).

53. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, divine eatables come to me.

54. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, all varieties of jewels come to me.

55. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, all kinds of perfumes come to me.

56. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, all kinds of vehicles come to me.

57. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, all kinds of garlands come to me.

58. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, (all manners of) decorations come to me.

59. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, maidens of all descriptions come to me.

60. On earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, come (to me) honey and sugar.

61. Oil earth as well as mountain, in the air, water and wood, wherever I stretch forth my hand, all varieties of solid food come to me.

62. To the poor and needy, to the professional and street-beggars, what-ever excellent gift I made, (it was) for the attainment of the Enlightenment par excellence.

63. While making mountains and rocks roar, dense forest thunder, this world and heaven joyous, I have become a Buddha in the world.

64. In this world, tenfold is the direction of which there is no end, and in that direction are the innumerable Buddha-realms.

65. My halo is described as shooting forth rays in pairs; let the blaze of rays between them be of great effulgence.

66. In such world-system, let all persons see me let all be joyful, and let all follow me.

67. Let the drum of immortality be beaten with reverberating sweet-sound; in the midst of it let all persons Hear my sweet voice.

68. While the cloud of righteousness showers, let all be free from the defilements ; let the lowest of beings be (at least) the Stream-winners.

69. Giving away the gift worthy to be given, I fulfilled the precepts entirely, reached perfection in the matter of renunciation, and obtained the Enlightenment par excellence.

70. Questioning the wise, I put forth the best energy, reached perfection in the matter of forbearance, and obtained the Enlightenment par excellence.

71. Intent on truth, I fulfilled the perfection of truth ; reaching perfection in friendliness, I obtained the Enlightenment par excellence.

72. In gain and loss, in happiness and sorrow, in respect and disrespect, being unperturbed under all vicissitudes, I obtained the Enlightenment par excellence.

73. Viewing idleness from fear, and energy from peace, be energetic - this is the command of the Buddha.

74. Viewing dissention from fear, and amity from peace, be united and kindly in speech - this is the command of the Buddhas.

75. Viewing indolence from fear, and diligence from peace, cultivate the eightfold path - this is the command of the Buddhas.

76. Assembled (here) are many Buddhas and Arahants from all quarters; to the supreme Buddhas and Arahants pay homage and bow down.

77. Thus are the Buddhas incomprehensible, and incomprehensible are the qualities of the Buddhas and incomprehensible is the reward of those who have faith in the incomprehensible.

Thus the Blessed One, while developing his own Buddha-life, related the religious discourse, called the Tradition of the previous excellent deeds of the Buddhas.


It is suprising that beauty of the Buddha-realm in the text is similar with those of Mahayanist text, e.q Amitabha Sutra. And the concept of many Buddha-realms in the text is similar with those of Mahayanist. I think, may be it is only mistranslation. Or, if the translation can be assumed as acceptable (good enough), are there commentary (atthakatha) of this text which can make the meaning clear?

Beside that, I remember that the Digha Nikaya reciters (Dighabhanakas), according to Buddhaghosa, didn't authorize Apadana as part of Sutta Pitaka. Can anyone help me??? Thx _/\_

Ps: I'm not a native English speaker. So pardon me if my English is not very good.
I'm sorry if my words are not understandable and it is in impolite expression, because my native language is not English....

Mettacitena

_/\_
seniya
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 1:58 pm

Re: Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????

Postby seniya » Tue Jan 18, 2011 12:24 pm

Hello, any body here????
I'm sorry if my words are not understandable and it is in impolite expression, because my native language is not English....

Mettacitena

_/\_
seniya
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 1:58 pm

Re: Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????

Postby Khalil Bodhi » Tue Jan 18, 2011 12:30 pm

It's definitely interesting but I haven't the slightest clue. I hope somebody with a lot more knowledge than I will reply. Be well.
To avoid all evil, to cultivate good, and to cleanse one's mind — this is the teaching of the Buddhas.
-Dhp. 183

Uposatha Observance Club:http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=148031379279&v=info
Kiva-Theravada Buddhists:http://www.kiva.org/team/theravada_buddhists
Dana on the Interwebs:
http://greatergood.com
http://freerice.com
User avatar
Khalil Bodhi
 
Posts: 1564
Joined: Tue Feb 03, 2009 6:32 pm
Location: NYC

Re: Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????

Postby Paññāsikhara » Wed Jan 19, 2011 2:36 am

seniya wrote:Hi there, I was looking for English translation of Apadana Pali text and when I'm googling it, I found the translation of first/introductory chapter of Apadana called Buddhapadana at http://www.archive.org/stream/bclawvolu ... 5/mode/2up by Dwijendralal Barua. It cointain 77 verses illustrating the Buddha who created all beauty of all Buddha-realms (= Buddhakhetta?) in his mind and brought all Buddhas, Arahats, dan Pacceka Buddhas from the past and present. They questioned each other about Dhamma etc.

Below is quotation of the translation:

BUDDHAPADANA
THE TRADITION OF THE PREVIOUS EXCELLENT DEEDS OF THE BUDDHA


Translation

1. Now, with a pure mind, attend to .the Tradition of the previous excellent deeds of the Buddhas, the innumerable kings of righteousness, replete with thirty Perfections.
...
77. Thus are the Buddhas incomprehensible, and incomprehensible are the qualities of the Buddhas and incomprehensible is the reward of those who have faith in the incomprehensible.

Thus the Blessed One, while developing his own Buddha-life, related the religious discourse, called the Tradition of the previous excellent deeds of the Buddhas.


It is suprising that beauty of the Buddha-realm in the text is similar with those of Mahayanist text, e.q Amitabha Sutra. And the concept of many Buddha-realms in the text is similar with those of Mahayanist.


Yes, similar to some Mahayana material. However, in the title of this thread, you use the phrase "Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????", but which way does the influence lie? When we look at the basic time periods of this material, we will see that much of it is actually before the Mahayana movement appeared. Thus, it is much more likely, and correct to say, that it is this sort of material that gradually developed into the Mahayana, rather than saying that the Mahayana influenced this material. These basic ideas were common throughout pretty much all the sectarian period pre-Mahayana Buddhist schools in India. There is not really much unusual about it.

I think, may be it is only mistranslation. Or, if the translation can be assumed as acceptable (good enough), are there commentary (atthakatha) of this text which can make the meaning clear?


Sure there is a commentary. Whether or not there is an English translation of it, or anyone here is going to take the hours to translate and / or explain on this thread, is another matter! (You do after all make a broad question, rather than asking about a specific term or phrase, which is much simpler.)

Beside that, I remember that the Digha Nikaya reciters (Dighabhanakas), according to Buddhaghosa, didn't authorize Apadana as part of Sutta Pitaka. Can anyone help me??? Thx _/\_


The content of the Khuddhaka Nikaya has aways been somewhat in dispute. Different groups accept it or reject it, either in its entirety or in part. When compared to the material of other schools, it is obvious that the entire content is something of a later compilation. Though compilation dates and actual composition dates are different things. (eg. Suttanipata as later compilation, but parts are rather early composition.)

Ps: I'm not a native English speaker. So pardon me if my English is not very good.


Your English seems fine to me! :smile:
My recently moved Blog, containing some of my writings on the Buddha Dhamma, as well as a number of translations from classical Buddhist texts and modern authors, liturgy, etc.: Huifeng's Prajnacara Blog.
Paññāsikhara
 
Posts: 980
Joined: Wed Oct 14, 2009 5:27 am

Re: Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????

Postby seniya » Wed Jan 19, 2011 2:07 pm

Yes, similar to some Mahayana material. However, in the title of this thread, you use the phrase "Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????", but which way does the influence lie? When we look at the basic time periods of this material, we will see that much of it is actually before the Mahayana movement appeared. Thus, it is much more likely, and correct to say, that it is this sort of material that gradually developed into the Mahayana, rather than saying that the Mahayana influenced this material. These basic ideas were common throughout pretty much all the sectarian period pre-Mahayana Buddhist schools in India. There is not really much unusual about it.


I don't sure it is the pre-Mahayana Buddhist school or latter, so I make the title like that. We should look the history of this text before we can be sure about that. Btw, your opinion is ought to be considered as one of the explanation....

Sure there is a commentary. Whether or not there is an English translation of it, or anyone here is going to take the hours to translate and / or explain on this thread, is another matter! (You do after all make a broad question, rather than asking about a specific term or phrase, which is much simpler.)


I don't think it too general, but I'm questioning the concept of Buddha-realms of this text. In Mahakassapa-theragatha, Mahakassapa said:

Yāvatā buddhakhettamhi, ṭhapayitvā mahāmuniṃ;
Dhutaguṇe visiṭṭhohaṃ, sadiso me na vijjati.


As far as this buddha-field extends
— except for the great sage himself —
I'm the one outstanding in ascetic qualities.
There's no one else like me.


We know that the Buddhakhetta in Pali canon (based on this gatha) is a domain where a Bodhisatta is born, attain Enlightenment, the Buddha teach Dhamma and the Buddha passed into Parinibbana, i.e in this very universe only one place like that (that is in our world-system). It doesn't say there is other Buddha-fields nor other Buddhas which currently teaching Dhamma in other Buddha-field like those in Mahayana concept.

The content of the Khuddhaka Nikaya has aways been somewhat in dispute. Different groups accept it or reject it, either in its entirety or in part. When compared to the material of other schools, it is obvious that the entire content is something of a later compilation. Though compilation dates and actual composition dates are different things. (eg. Suttanipata as later compilation, but parts are rather early composition.)


Yes, I know that. Even today, post-canonical works like Milinda Panha, Patisambhidha, etc is included in Khuddaka Nikaya by Burmese Theravadin Buddhist.

Your English seems fine to me! :smile:


Thx, bro.... :)
I'm sorry if my words are not understandable and it is in impolite expression, because my native language is not English....

Mettacitena

_/\_
seniya
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 1:58 pm

Re: Buddhapadana: Influence from Mahayanist????

Postby seniya » Mon Jan 31, 2011 2:54 pm

@pannasikhara:

Today I have an message from Samaneri Pannadevi on a Buddhist forum in my country. She said that you are a Buddhist monk and it isn't polite to call Ven. Pannasikhara as "bro". At that time, I really didn't know the truth. Now I'm feel very sory for calling Bhante in such an impolite way. I hope Bhante can accept my apologize and forgive me for the fault I have done before.

@moderators:

I know this post is out of topic, but please don't delete this....

_/\_
I'm sorry if my words are not understandable and it is in impolite expression, because my native language is not English....

Mettacitena

_/\_
seniya
 
Posts: 17
Joined: Mon Jan 17, 2011 1:58 pm


Return to Classical Theravāda

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest