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Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response - Dhamma Wheel

Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
thornbush
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Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby thornbush » Fri Mar 13, 2009 1:13 pm

Apostasy: a simple definition here: http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/apostasy
What is the Buddhist view on this matter? Your thoughts please...thank you :anjali:

Namo Amitabha Buddha!

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Ben
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Ben » Fri Mar 13, 2009 1:20 pm

Its a particularly cute characteristic of abrahamanic religions. Only fundamentalist Islam professes to maintain the traditional punishment of apostasy of inflicting some form of gruesome death on the wayward.
Thankfully, Buddhism is a little more enlightened.

B
“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

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e: [email protected]..

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kc2dpt
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby kc2dpt » Fri Mar 13, 2009 1:36 pm

- Peter


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Rui Sousa
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Rui Sousa » Fri Mar 13, 2009 2:23 pm

Peter,

I guess :shrug: is an excellent answer... :smile:
With Metta

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David N. Snyder
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Mar 13, 2009 2:26 pm

The English term apostasy comes from the Latin apostata and means ‘to move away from,’ while the Arabic term riddah means ‘turning back.’ Apostasy is therefore to renounce one’s religion and adopt another or no religion. Buddhism does not have a legalistic approach to belief and thus never developed a concept of apostasy, nor did any Buddhist cultures have such a concept. In Buddhism, the individual is free to believe or not according to his or her own inclinations and understanding. The Buddha’s attitude to apostasy is epitomised by his encounter with a man named Sunakkhatta. He was a disciple of the Buddha, but after a while became dissatisfied with the Dhamma and decided to renounce the Teacher and the teaching. Sunakkhatta came to the Buddha and said; ‘Lord, I am leaving you, I am no longer living by your teachings.’ The Buddha responded to this declaration by asking Sunakkhatta some questions. ‘Did I ever say to you; come, live by my teachings’. ‘No Lord’. ‘Then did you ever say to me that you wished to live by my teachings’. ‘No Lord’. ‘That being the case, who are you and what are you giving up, you foolish man?’ (Digha Nikaya 3. 2-3). Neither in this case nor others did the Buddha suggest that apostates be punished; nor did he say that apostates would go to hell simply because of their apostasy.

from: http://www.BuddhismAtoZ.com/ Buddhism A to Z. by Ven. Dhammika, 2007.
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Bhikkhu Pesala
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Fri Mar 13, 2009 3:24 pm

• • • • (Upasampadā: 24th June, 1979)

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Jechbi
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Jechbi » Fri Mar 13, 2009 4:30 pm

My thoughts: Apostasy always seems to imply some social conduct. It's possible to conceive of private, individual apostasy, where a person goes through a process of self-inquiry and then quietly decides to change religions without announcing it to anyone or engaging others. But that's pretty much never what apostasy means. Instead, it seems to mean the person who publicly "changes sides." So it generally seems to include some desire to sway others, as well. It's probably important to understand all of the different motivations and actions involved in apostasy, since all of them can be different forms of kamma. Thanks for asking.
:juggling:

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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Individual » Fri Mar 13, 2009 5:46 pm

Last edited by Individual on Fri Mar 13, 2009 5:56 pm, edited 2 times in total.
The best things in life aren't things.


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David N. Snyder
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Mar 13, 2009 5:48 pm

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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Individual » Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:00 pm

The best things in life aren't things.


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David N. Snyder
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby David N. Snyder » Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:09 pm

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tiltbillings
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:19 pm


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Cittasanto
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Cittasanto » Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:20 pm

If the glove fits wear it, if it doesn't don't!

I don't really care if someone does or doesn't believe the same as me, or changes their mind.


He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
He must be able to hear them from persons who actually believe them … he must know them in their most plausible and persuasive form.

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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Individual » Fri Mar 13, 2009 6:37 pm

The best things in life aren't things.


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Ravana
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Ravana » Fri Mar 13, 2009 7:06 pm

“The incomparable Wheel of Dhamma has been set in motion by the Blessed One in the deer sanctuary at Isipatana, and no seeker, brahmin, celestial being, demon, god, or any other being in the world can stop it.”

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Dhammanando
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Dhammanando » Sat Mar 14, 2009 1:45 am


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tiltbillings
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Mar 14, 2009 2:19 am


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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Dhammanando » Sat Mar 14, 2009 3:18 am


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tiltbillings
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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Mar 14, 2009 5:50 am


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Re: Apostasy: A Buddhist View and Response

Postby Dhammanando » Sat Mar 14, 2009 8:18 am



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