New Book

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New Book

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:10 am

Johannes Bronkhorst: Buddhism in the Shadow of Brahmanism.
Leiden - Boston: Brill. 2011. (Handbook of Oriental Studies,
2/24.) ISBN: 978-90-04-20140-8.

Alas, $169.00, but eventually it may come out in an affordable price.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Re: New Book

Postby plwk » Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:32 am

Yeah when they decide to print it in a New Delhi press...
Bhikkhus, if you develop and make much this one thing,
it invariably leads to weariness, cessation, appeasement, realization and extinction.
What is it? It is recollecting the Enlightened One.
If this single thing is recollected and made much,
it invariably leads to weariness, cessation, appeasement, realization and extinction.

Anguttara-Nikaya: Ekanipata: Ekadhammapali: Pañhamavagga
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Re: New Book

Postby Vossaga (Element) » Thu Mar 10, 2011 7:47 am

For many centuries Buddhism and Brahmanism coexisted in the Indian subcontinent. This book concentrates on the way in which the two, after an initial period of relative independence, confronted each other, both in and around the royal courts and in society at large. In this confrontation, Buddhism was strong in philosophical debate, but could not compete with Brahmanism in the services it could provide to the centres of political power, primarily ritual protection and practical advice. Buddhism evolved in both areas, providing practical advice to lay people and rulers from early Mahayana onward, and ritual protection in its Tantric developments. Some of these developments came too late, though, and could not prevent the disappearance of Buddhism from the subcontinent.

http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=227&pid=44969 :reading:
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Re: New Book

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Mar 10, 2011 8:16 am

Vossaga wrote:
For many centuries Buddhism and Brahmanism coexisted in the Indian subcontinent. This book concentrates on the way in which the two, after an initial period of relative independence, confronted each other, both in and around the royal courts and in society at large. In this confrontation, Buddhism was strong in philosophical debate, but could not compete with Brahmanism in the services it could provide to the centres of political power, primarily ritual protection and practical advice. Buddhism evolved in both areas, providing practical advice to lay people and rulers from early Mahayana onward, and ritual protection in its Tantric developments. Some of these developments came too late, though, and could not prevent the disappearance of Buddhism from the subcontinent.

http://www.brill.nl/default.aspx?partid=227&pid=44969 :reading:
Except for the early Mahayana part, which is not necessarily supported by evidence, if one is to belief G. Schopen, the above is an interesting assessment:

"... even after its initial appearance in the public domain in the 2nd century
[Mahayana] appears to have remained an extremely limited minority movement - if
it remained at all - that attracted absolutely no documented public or popular
support for at least two more centuries. It is again a demonstrable fact that
anything even approaching popular support for the Mahayana cannot be documented
until 4th/5th century AD, and even then the support is overwhelmingly monastic,
not lay, donors ... although there was - as we know from Chinese translations - a large
and early Mahayana literature there was no early, organized, independent,
publicly supported movement that it could have belonged to."

-- G. Schopen "The Inscription on the Ku.san image of Amitabha and the
character of the early Mahayana in India." JIABS 10, 2 pgs 124-5


I think far more interesting and useful would be the sort of thing Gombrich talks about in his more recent books, which are the obvious responses by the Buddha in the suttas to brahmanical ideas. Now, seeing that synopsis, I can certainly wait.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
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Posts: 19404
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am


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