Suttas on monks behaviour

Discussion of ordination, the Vinaya and monastic life. How and where to ordain? Bhikkhuni ordination etc.

Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Wed Jun 15, 2011 9:59 pm

Hello all,

It is pretty clear from the vinaya what a monks code of conduct should be. But it would be interesting to see what the Buddha said in the suttas about how they should practice, behave etc - I wonder if the sutta would line up with the vinaya (pretty sure it would), and other such interesting matters can perhaps be explored here. if you come across suttas on the matter please share it with everyone on this thread/forum.

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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby bodom » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:31 pm

rowyourboat wrote:Hello all,

It is pretty clear from the vinaya what a monks code of conduct should be. But it would be interesting to see what the Buddha said in the suttas about how they should practice, behave etc - I wonder if the sutta would line up with the vinaya (pretty sure it would), and other such interesting matters can perhaps be explored here. if you come across suttas on the matter please share it with everyone on this thread/forum.

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Matheesha


Hi Matheesha

Im not sure why you are separating the Sutta's from the Vinaya. Sutta's abound in the Vinaya, specifically the Suttavibhanga of the Vinaya which contains each sutta that was given on the occasion for the rule being laid down.

Suttavibhanga
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... index.html

:namaste:
The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Wed Jun 15, 2011 10:45 pm

Hi Bodom,

I had the following kind of sutta in mind, but thanks for the suttavibhanga.

AN 10.48PTS: A v 87
Dasadhamma Sutta: Ten Things
translated from the Pali by
Thanissaro Bhikkhu
© 1994–2011
Alternate translation: Piyadassi
"There are these ten things that a person gone-forth should reflect on often. Which ten?

"'I have become casteless': a person gone forth should often reflect on this.

"'My life is dependent on others'...

"'My behavior should be different [from that of householders]'...

"'Can I fault myself with regard to my virtue?'...

"'Can my knowledgeable fellows in the holy life, on close examination, fault me with regard to my virtue?'...

"'I will grow different, separate from all that is dear & appealing to me'...

"'I am the owner of my actions (kamma), heir to my actions, born of my actions, related through my actions, and have my actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir'...

"'What am I becoming as the days & nights fly past?'...

"'Do I delight in an empty dwelling?'...

"'Have I attained a superior human attainment, a truly noble distinction of knowledge & vision, such that — when my fellows in the holy life question me in the last days of my life — I won't feel abashed?': a person gone forth should often reflect on this.

"These are the ten things that a person gone-forth should reflect on often."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Sat Jun 18, 2011 2:35 pm

Majjhima Nikàya I.
1. 3. Dhammadàyàdasuttaü
(3) To Inherit the Teaching



I heard thus.

At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anàthapindika in Jeta's grove in Sàvatthi. The Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus from there.

ßBhikkhus, be the inheriters of my Teaching and not the inheriters of my material. There's my compassion towards you. Whatever it is, be the inheriters of my Teaching not the inheriters of my material. Bhikkhus, should you become the inheriters of my material not the inheriters of my Teaching, by that you become the examples: `The disciples of a Teacher abiding as inheriters of material and not as inheriters of the Teaching. ' By that I too become the Teacher who has inherited the disciples with my material and not my Teaching. Bhikkhus, be the inheriters of my Teaching and not the inheriters of my material, by that you become the example, `The disciples of the Teacher abiding as inheriters of the Teach ing not as inheriters of material. ' By that I too become an example as the Teacher abiding inheriting the disciples with the Teaching and not inheriting material. Therefore bhikkhus abide as inheriters of the Teaching and not as inheriters of material. There is my compassion towards you. Whatever it is be the inheriters of my Teaching and not the inheriters of my material.

ßHere, bhikkhus, I have partaken of my meal, satiated not desiring any more, and there is some morsel food left over to be thrown away. Then two bhikkhus overcome by hunger and weakness come along and I tell them: `Bhikkhus, I have partaken of my meal, is satiated and do not desire any more, there is some morsel food left over to be thrown away, If you desire, partake of it, if you do not partake it I will throw it to some place where there is no green, or I will put it in some water where there are no living things. '

ßTo one of those bhikkhus, it occurs thus: `The Blessed One has partaken of his meal, is satiated and does not desire any more of it. There is some morsel food left over to be thrown away. If we do not partake of it, he will throw it to some place where there is no green, or will put it in some water where there is no life. Yet it is told by the Blessed One this: Bhikkhus, be the heirs of my Teaching and not the heirs of my material. Morsel food is one of the material, What if I spend this day and night bearing up this hunger and discomfort? He not partaking that food spends that night and day bearing up that hunger and discomfort. '

ßTo the other bhikkhu it occurs thus: `The Blessed One has partaken of his meal, is satiated and does not desire any more of it. There is some morsel food left over to be thrown away. If we do not partake of it the Blessed One will throw it to a place where there is no green or will put it in some water where there are no living things. What if I partake of that morsel food and put an end to my hunger and discomfort and spend the night and day?'

ßSo he partakes of that morsel food puts an end to his hunger and discomfort and spends the night and day. Bhikkhus, whoever the bhikkhu who partook of the morsel food, overcame the hunger and discomfort and spent the night and day, yet the earlier bhikkhu is more reverential and praiseworthy. What is the reason? Because it conduces to that bhikkhu's few desires, satisfaction, purity, the nature of being suppoted easily, and for arousing of effort.

Therefore, be the heirs of my Teaching and not the heirs of my material. Bhikkkus, there is my compasssion to you. Any way my disciples should be heirs of the Teaching and not the heirs of my material.û

The Blessed One said that and went into the monastery.

Soon after the Blessed One left, venerable Sàriputta addressed the bhikkhus: ßFriends, of a Teacher abiding in seclusion, how do the disciples not train in that seclusion? And of a Teacher abiding in seclusion how do the disciples train in that same seclusion?û

ßFriend Sàriputta, we came from afar to learn the meaning of these words from venerable Sàriputta, good that it occurs to venerable Sàriputta, and hearing it from you, the bhikkhus will bear it in mind.û

ßThen listen friends, bhikkhus: attend carefully.û And venerable Sàriputta said:

ßHere, friends, of a Teacher abiding in seclusion, the disciples do not train in that seclusion. The things the Teacher said dispel, they would not dispel, they live in abundance and lethargy, missing the main aim, and they do not yoke themselves to seclusion. For this the elders have to be blamed for three things. Of a Teacher abiding in seclusion, the disciples do not train in that seclusion. This is the first blame that comes on the elders.

ßThe things that the Teacher said dispel, they would not dispel. This is the second blame that comes on the elders. Living in abundance and lethargy, they miss the main aim and do not yoke themselves to seclusion. This is the third blame that comes on the elders. The elders have to be blamed for these three things.

The middling bhikkhus, too have to be blamad for these three things. The novice bhikkhus too have to be blamed for these three things. Friends, it is in this manner, that of a Teacher abiding in seclusion, the disciples do not train in that seclusion.

ßFriends, of a Teacher abiding in seclusion how do the disciples train in that seclusion. Of a Teacher abiding in seclusion, the disciples train in that seclusion. The things the Teacher says dispel, they dispel. Not living in abundance and lethargy, they do not miss the main aim and yoke themselves to seclusion. For this the elders are to be praised for three things. Of a Teacher abiding in seclusion the disciples train in that seclusion This is the first praise that come to the elders. The things the Teacher said dispel, that they dispel. This is the second praise that come to the elders. Not living in abundance and lethargy, they do not miss the main aim and yoke themselves to seclusion. This is the third praise that come to the elders. The elders are praised for these three things. The middling bhikkhus too have to be praised for these three. The novice bhikkhus too have to be praised for these three. Friends, it is in this manner, that of a Teacher abiding in seclusion, the disciples train in that seclusion ...

ßThere friends, greed is an evil, anger is an evil. To dispel greed and anger, there is the middle path which conduces to wisdom, knowledge enlightenment and extinction. It is this same noble eightfold path such as right view, right thoughts, right speech, right actions, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration. Friends, this is the middle path which conduces to wisdom, knowledge, enlightenment and extinction. There friends, anger is an evil, ill will is an evil, hypocrisy is an evil, mercilessness is an evil, envy is an evil, selfishness is an evil, deceit is an evil, craftiness is an evil, obstinacy is an evil, haughty talk is an evil, measuring is an evil, conceit is an evil, intoxication is an evil, negligence is an evil, To dispel intoxication and negligence, there is the middle path which conduces to wisdom, knowledge, enlightenment, and extinction. It is this same noble eightfold path such as right view, right thoughts, right speech, right actions, right livelihood, right effort, right mindfulness, and right concentration.û

Venerable Sàriputta said those words and the bhikkhus delighted In his words.


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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Fri Jul 01, 2011 5:50 am

"Drunk with the intoxication of youth, a monk leaves the training and returns to the lower life. Drunk with the intoxication of health, a monk leaves the training and returns to the lower life. Drunk with the intoxication of life, a monk leaves the training and returns to the lower life."
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html


"There are these five facts that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained. Which five?

"'I am subject to aging, have not gone beyond aging.' This is the first fact that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained.

"'I am subject to illness, have not gone beyond illness.' ...

"'I am subject to death, have not gone beyond death.' ...

"'I will grow different, separate from all that is dear and appealing to me.' ...

"'I am the owner of my actions,[1] heir to my actions, born of my actions, related through my actions, and have my actions as my arbitrator. Whatever I do, for good or for evil, to that will I fall heir.' ...

"These are the five facts that one should reflect on often, whether one is a woman or a man, lay or ordained.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Wed Jul 06, 2011 6:12 am

Akankha Sutta: Wishes
AN 10.71 PTS: A v 131
translated from the Pali by
Thanissaro Bhikkhu
© 1998–2011
On one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. There he addressed the monks, "Monks!"

"Yes, lord," the monks responded.

The Blessed One said: "Monks, dwell consummate in virtue, consummate in terms of the Patimokkha. Dwell restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in your behavior & sphere of activity. Train yourselves, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.

[1] "If a monk would wish, 'May I be dear & pleasing to my fellows in the holy life, respected by & inspiring to them,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[2] "If a monk would wish, 'May I be someone who receives robes, almsfood, lodgings, & medical requisites for curing the sick,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[3] "If a monk would wish, 'Whatever I use or consume in terms of robes, almsfood, lodgings, & medical requisites for curing the sick, may that be of great fruit, of great benefit to those who provided them,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[4] "If a monk would wish, 'May it also be of great fruit, of great benefit, to whatever dead relatives they [the donors] recollect with brightened minds,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[5] "If a monk would wish, 'May I be content with whatever robes, almsfood, lodgings, & medical requisites for curing the sick are available,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[6] "If a monk would wish, 'May I be resistant to cold, heat, hunger, & thirst; to the touch of gadflies & mosquitoes, wind & sun & creeping things; to abusive, hurtful language; to bodily feelings that, when they arise, are painful, sharp, stabbing, fierce, distasteful, deadly,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[7] "If a monk would wish, 'May I overcome displeasure, and not be overcome by displeasure. May I dwell having conquered any displeasure that has arisen,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[8] "If a monk would wish, 'May I overcome fear & dread, and not be overcome by fear & dread. May I dwell having conquered any fear & dread that have arisen,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[9] "If a monk would wish, 'May I attain — whenever I want, without strain, without difficulty — the four jhanas that are heightened mental states, pleasant abidings in the here-&-now,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

[10] "If a monk would wish, 'May I — with the ending of mental fermentations — remain in the fermentation-free awareness-release & discernment-release, having directly known & realized them for myself in the here-&-now,' then he should be one who brings the precepts to perfection, who is committed to inner tranquillity of awareness, who does not neglect jhana, who is endowed with insight, and who frequents empty dwellings.

"'Monks, dwell consummate in virtue, consummate in terms of the Patimokkha. Dwell restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in your behavior & sphere of activity. Train yourselves, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.' Thus was it said. And in reference to this was it said."

See also: AN 4.28.

Provenance: ©1998 Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Transcribed from a file provided by the translator. This Access to Insight edition is ©1998–2011.
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How to cite this document (one suggested style): "Akankha Sutta: Wishes" (AN 10.71), translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Access to Insight, 4 July 2010, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html.
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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Sat Jul 16, 2011 4:36 am

Rohini
Tipitaka Khuddaka Therigatha, Thig 13.2 PTS: Thig 271-290
translated from the Pali by
Thanissaro Bhikkhu
© 2000–2011

[Rohini's father:]
You go to sleep saying,
"Contemplatives."
You wake up,
"Contemplatives."
You praise only
contemplatives.
No doubt you will be
a contemplative.

Abundant food & drink
you give to contemplatives.
Now, Rohini, I ask you:
Why do you hold
contemplatives dear?

They don't like to work,
they're lazy,
living off what's given by others,
full of hankerings,
wanting delicious things:
Why do you hold
contemplatives dear?

[Rohini:]
For a long time, father,
you've quizzed me
about contemplatives.
I'll praise to you
their discernment,
virtue,
endeavor.

They do like to work,
they're not lazy.
They do the best work:
They abandon
passion & anger.
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

They rid themselves
of the three evil roots,[1]
doing pure actions.
All their evil's
abandoned.
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

Clean their bodily action,
so is their verbal action.
Clean their mental action:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

Spotless, like mother of pearl,
pure within & without,
perfect in clear qualities:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

Learned, maintaining the Dhamma,
noble, living the Dhamma,
they teach the goal
& the Dhamma:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

Learned, maintaining the Dhamma,
noble, living the Dhamma,
with unified minds
& mindful:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

Traveling far, mindful,
giving counsel unruffled,
they discern the end
of suffering:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

When they leave any village
they don't turn to look back
at anything.
How free from concern
they go!
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

They don't store in a granary,
pot,
or basket.
They hunt [only]
for what's already cooked:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

They take neither silver,
nor gold,
nor money.
They live off whatever is present:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

Having gone forth
from different families
& from different countries,
still they hold
one another dear:
That's why I hold
contemplatives dear.

[Rohini's father:]
Rohini, truly for our well-being
were you born in our family.
You have conviction
in the Buddha & Dhamma,
and strong respect
for the Sangha.

You truly discern
this field of merit
unexcelled.
These contemplatives will receive
our offering, too,
for here we'll set up
our abundant sacrifice.

[Rohini:]
If you're afraid of pain,
if you dislike pain,
go to the Buddha for refuge,
go to the Dhamma & Sangha.
Take on the precepts:
That will lead
to your well-being.

[Rohini's father:]
I go to the Buddha for refuge;
I go to the Dhamma & Sangha.
I take on the precepts:
That will lead
to my well-being.

Before, I was a kinsman to Brahma;
now, truly a brahman.
I'm a three-knowledge man & safe,
consummate in knowledge,
washed clean.
Notes

1.
The three unskillful roots are greed, aversion, and delusion.
See also: SN 7.17; Sn 1.4.

Provenance: ©2000 Thanissaro Bhikkhu. Transcribed from a file provided by the translator. This Access to Insight edition is ©2000–2011.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html.
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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Fri Jul 22, 2011 1:32 pm

Then in the evening, Ven. Sariputta arose from his seclusion and went to Ven. Punna. On arrival, he exchanged courteous greetings with him. After an exchange of friendly greetings & courtesies, he sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to Ven. Punna, "My friend, is the holy life lived under the Blessed One?"

"Yes, my friend."

"And is the holy life lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of virtue?"[2]

"No, my friend."

"Then is the holy life lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of mind [concentration]?"

"No, my friend."

"Then is the holy life lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of view?"

"No, my friend."

"Then is the holy life lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of the overcoming of perplexity?"

"No, my friend."

"Then is the holy life lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of knowledge & vision of what is & is not the path?"

"No, my friend."

"Then is the holy life lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of knowledge & vision of the way?"

"No, my friend."

"Then is the holy life lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of knowledge & vision?"

"No, my friend."

"When asked if the holy life is lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of virtue, you say, 'No, my friend.' When asked if the holy life is lived under the Blessed One for the sake of purity in terms of mind... view... the overcoming of perplexity... knowledge & vision of what is & is not the path... knowledge & vision of the way... knowledge & vision, you say, 'No, my friend.' For the sake of what, then, my friend, is the holy life lived under the Blessed One?"

"The holy life is lived under the Blessed One, my friend, for the sake of total Unbinding through lack of clinging."[3]
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:03 am

Tipitaka Anguttara Nikaya Sevens
AN 7.68PTS: A iv 128
Aggikkhandopama Sutta: The Mass of Fire Comparison
translated from the Pali by
Yahoo! Pali Group
© 2002–2011
Translators' note: In this sutta, from the Anguttara Nikaya's Book of the Sevens, the Buddha compares seven pairs of situations a monk might hypothetically face and asks the monks to choose which of each pair is the better. While listening to the Buddha's explanations of the correct choice in each case, sixty monks become enlightened — another instance of enlightenment directly from hearing a talk by the Buddha.

Thus have I heard. Once the Blessed One was wandering among the Kosala people together with a large company of monks. Entering a major path, the Blessed One saw in a certain spot a great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing. After seeing it and stepping down from the path he sat on the appointed seat at the root of a tree. After sitting down the Blessed One said to the monks: "Do you see, monks, that great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing?" — " Yes, venerable Sir."

[1] "What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? Embracing that great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing, and sitting or lying down close to it? Or, embracing a kshatriya or brahman or householder woman with young and tender hands and feet, and sitting or lying down close to her?" — "This, venerable Sir, would surely be the better: Embracing a kshatriya or brahman or householder woman with young and tender hands and feet, and sitting or lying down close to her. For it would be painful, venerable Sir, to embrace that great, burning, blazing, glowing mass of fire, and sit or lie down close to it."

"Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, monks, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an evil-minded one, a filthy doer of complete wickedness who acts in an underhand manner, who pretends to be a recluse yet is not a recluse, who pretends to lead the holy life yet does not lead the holy life, an inwardly-putrid, impure-natured one: Embracing that great mass of fire, burning, blazing, glowing, and sitting or lying down close to it. What is the reason for this? Because on account of that, monks, he would go to death, or to a pain like that of death, but he would not, on account of that, on the break-up of the body after death be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory."

"But, monks, if one who is of poor conduct, an evil-minded one, a filthy doer of complete wickedness who acts in an underhand manner, who pretends to be a recluse yet is not a recluse, who pretends to lead the holy life yet does not lead the holy life, an inwardly-putrid, impure-natured one, were to embrace a kshatriya or brahman or householder woman with young and tender hands and feet, and sit or lie down close to her — for him, monks, there would be a long period of harm and suffering, and on the break-up of the body after death he would be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory."

[2] "What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having twisted a firm horse-hair rope around both calves, were to rub, so that the rope cut the skin, and having cut the skin it cut the under-skin, and having cut the under-skin it cut the flesh, and having cut the flesh it cut the sinew, and having cut the sinew it cut the bone, and having cut the bone it left the marrow exposed? Or, to derive enjoyment from the homage of rich kshatriyas, or rich brahmans, or rich householders?" — "This, venerable Sir, is surely the better: To derive enjoyment from the homage of rich kshatriyas, or rich brahmans, or rich householders. For it would be painful, venerable Sir, if a strong man, having twisted a firm hair-rope around both calves, were to rub, so that the rope cut the skin and so on until it left the marrow exposed."

"Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, monks, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having twisted a firm horse-hair rope around both calves, were to rub, so that the rope cut the skin and so on until it left the marrow exposed. What is the reason for this? Because on account of that, monks, he would go to death, or to a pain like that of death, but on account of that he would not, on the break-up of the body after death, be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory."

"But, monks, if one who is of poor conduct, an evil-minded one, a filthy doer of complete wickedness, an impure-natured one, were to derive enjoyment from the homage of rich kshatriyas, or rich brahmans, or rich householders — for him, monks, there would be a long period of harm and suffering, and on the break-up of the body after death he would be reborn into a place of woe, a realm of misery, a place of suffering, a purgatory."

[3] "What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man were to strike the nether-quarters with a sharp, oil-cleaned sword? Or, to derive enjoyment when rich kshatriyas, brahmans, or householders press the palms together in prayer?"

"Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man were to strike the nether-quarters with a sharp, oil-cleaned sword."

[4] "What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man were to wrap the body with a red-hot sheet of iron, burning, blazing, glowing? Or, to derive enjoyment from the robes given in faith by rich kshatriyas, brahmans, or householders?"

"Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man were to wrap the body with a red-hot sheet of iron."

[5] "What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having opened the mouth with a red-hot iron spike, were to hurl into the mouth a red-hot iron ball, burning, blazing, glowing, so that one's lips would burn, then the mouth would burn, then the tongue would burn, then the throat would burn, then the chest would burn, and when it was received by the lower intestine, it would be expelled from the lower part of the body? Or, to derive enjoyment from the food received on alms-round and given in faith by rich kshatriyas, brahmans, or householders?"

"Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having opened the mouth with a red-hot iron spike were to hurl into the mouth a red-hot iron ball."

[6] "What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having gripped the head or shoulder, were to force one sit or lie on a red-hot iron bed or chair? Or, to derive enjoyment from a chair given in faith by rich kshatriyas, or brahmans, or householders?"

"Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having gripped the head or shoulder, were to force one sit or lie on a red-hot iron bed or chair."

[7] "What do you think, monks? Which would in fact be the better? If a strong man, having gripped one, heels up, head down, were to force one down into a red-hot iron cauldron, burning, blazing, glowing, and where there is boiling scum on top, he were to go once up, once down, and then once sideways? Or, to derive enjoyment from an abode given in faith by rich kshatriyas, or brahmans, or householders?"

"Let me tell you, monks, let me explain to you, that this would surely be the better for one who is of poor conduct, an impure-natured one: If a strong man, having gripped one, heels up, head down, were to force one down into a red-hot iron cauldron."

"Because of what I have said here, monks, you should train yourselves such that the gifts of those whose requisites we use — the robes, alms-bowl, chair, bed, and medicine as a support when sick — will have great fruits, great merits [for the people who give them], and our going forth will not be in vain, will be fruitful, will have a result. Thus should you train yourselves, thoroughly seeing that for your own benefit, monks, it is right to strive with heedfulness; thoroughly seeing that for the benefit of others, monks, it is right to strive with heedfulness; and thoroughly seeing that for the benefit of both, monks, it is right to strive with heedfulness."

Thus spoke the Blessed One. And while this explanation was being delivered, hot blood rose out of the mouths of sixty monks; another sixty monks abandoned the training and returned to the lower life, saying, "It is too difficult to do, Blessed One, it is too difficult to do"; while the minds of another sixty monks abandoned clinging and were liberated from the aasava-s.

Provenance:©2002 Yahoo.Transcribed from a file provided by Derek Cameron.This Access to Insight edition is ©2002–2011.
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How to cite this document (one suggested style): "Aggikkhandopama Sutta: The Mass of Fire Comparison" (AN 7.68), translated from the Pali by Yahoo! Pali Group. Access to Insight, 4 July 2010, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... 7/an07.068.
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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Tue Aug 02, 2011 5:12 am

SN 47.46PTS: S v 187CDB ii 1662
Paa.timokkha Sutta: Obligation
translated from the Pali by
Maurice O'Connell Walshe
© 2007–2011
The Pali title of this sutta is based on the PTS (Feer) edition.
[A certain monk said to the Buddha:] "It would be well for me, Lord, if the Blessed One would teach me briefly a doctrine so that having heard it I might dwell alone, in seclusion, unwearied, ardent and resolute."

"Well then, monk, you should purify the rudiments of skill. And what are the rudiments of skill?

"In this, monk, you must dwell restrained according to the restraint of the Obligations,[1] having perfected the scope of your practice,[2] aware of danger in the slightest faults, undertaking the precepts and training yourself in them.[3]

"Having done this, then, monk, with morality[4] as your support, established in morality, you must practice the four foundations of mindfulness. Which four?

"In this, monk, you must dwell in contemplation of body... feelings... mind... mind-objects, ardent, clearly aware, mindful, having got rid of worldly longing and depression.

"Then, monk, when, with morality as your support, established in morality, you have cultivated the four foundations of mindfulness, then you will obtain by night and by day that hoped-for increase in skilled states, which will not decline."

[Delighted, the monk practiced as instructed and, in due course, became an Arahant.]

Notes

1.
Paa.timokkha, the monastic code of conduct, now enshrined in the 227 rules which are recited fortnightly.
2.
Acaara-gocara-sampanno, i.e., "having perfected the training up to the stage you have reached."
3.
Reading with Woodward sikkhaahi "train yourself" (imperative) instead of Feer's sikkhasi.
4.
Siila: "disciplined behavior."
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Re: Suttas on monks behaviour

Postby rowyourboat » Sat Aug 06, 2011 9:18 pm

AN 10.48 PTS: A v 87
Dasadhamma Sutta: Discourse on The Ten Dhammas
translated from the Pali by
Piyadassi Thera
© 1999–2011

Thus have I heard:

On one occasion the Blessed One was living near Savatthi at Jetavana at the monastery of Anathapindika.

Then the Blessed One addressed the monks, saying: "Monks." — "Venerable Sir," they said by way of reply. The Blessed One then spoke as follows:

"These ten essentials[1] must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth (to live the holy life). What are these ten?

1. "'I am now changed into a different mode of life (from that of a layman).' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

2. "'My life depends on others.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

3. "'I must now behave in a different manner.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

4. "'Does my mind upbraid me regarding the state of my virtue?'[2] This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

5. "'Do my discerning fellow-monks having tested me, reproach me regarding the state of my virtue?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

6. "'There will be a parting (some day) from all those who are dear and loving to me. Death brings this separation to me.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

7. "'Of kamma[3] I am constituted. Kamma is my inheritance; kamma is the matrix; kamma is my kinsman; kamma is my refuge. Whatever kamma I perform, be it good or bad, to that I shall be heir.' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

8. "'How do I spend my nights and days?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

9. "'Do I take delight in solitude?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

10. "'Have I gained superhuman faculties? Have I gained that higher wisdom so that when I am questioned (on this point) by fellow-monks at the last moment (when death is approaching) I will have no occasion to be depressed and downcast?' This must be reflected upon again and again by one who has gone forth.

"These, monks, are the essentials that should be reflected again and again by one who has gone forth (to live the holy life)."

So spoke the Blessed One. Those monks rejoiced at the words of the Blessed One.

Notes

1.
Dhammas.
2.
Sila.
3.
Literally action — mental, verbal, and physica

with metta :anjali:

Matheesha
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