MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

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MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Aug 15, 2011 11:02 pm

This sutta recently turned up on Access to Insight:

MN 113 PTS: M iii 37
Sappurisa Sutta: A Person of Integrity
translated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying at Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. There he addressed the monks: "Monks!"

"Yes, lord," the monks replied.

The Blessed One said, "Monks, I will teach you the quality of a person of integrity and the quality of a person of no integrity. Listen, and pay close attention. I will speak."

"Yes, lord," the monks replied.

The Blessed One said: "And which is the quality of a person of no integrity?

"There is the case where a person of no integrity goes forth from a high-ranking family. He notices, 'I have gone forth from a high-ranking family, but these other monks have not gone forth from a high-ranking family.' He exalts himself for having a high-ranking family and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'It's not through having a high-ranking family that the quality of greed goes to its end; it's not through having a high-ranking family that the quality of aversion... the quality of delusion goes to its end. Even though one has not gone forth from a high-ranking family, if — practicing the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, practicing masterfully — he is one who follows the Dhamma, he is to be honored for that, praised for that.' So, giving priority just to the practice, he neither exalts himself for having a high-ranking family nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity goes forth from a great family... a family of great wealth... a family of extensive wealth. He notices, 'I have gone forth from a family of extensive wealth, but these other monks have not gone forth from a family of extensive wealth.' He exalts himself for having a family of extensive wealth and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'It's not through having a family of extensive wealth that the quality of greed goes to its end; it's not through having a family of extensive wealth that the quality of aversion... the quality of delusion goes to its end. Even though one has not gone forth from a family of extensive wealth, if — practicing the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, practicing masterfully — he is one who follows the Dhamma, he is to be honored for that, praised for that.' So, giving priority just to the practice, he neither exalts himself for having a family of extensive wealth nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity is well-known & highly regarded. He notices, 'I am well-known & highly regarded, but these other monks are hardly known & have hardly any influence.' He exalts himself for being well-known & highly regarded and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'It's not through being well-known & highly regarded that the quality of greed goes to its end; it's not through being well-known & highly regarded that the quality of aversion... the quality of delusion goes to its end. Even though one is not well-known & highly regarded, if — practicing the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, practicing masterfully — he is one who follows the Dhamma, he is to be honored for that, praised for that.' So, giving priority just to the practice, he neither exalts himself for being well-known nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity is one who gains robe-cloth, alms-food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick. He notices, 'I am one who gains robe-cloth, alms-food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick, but these other monks are not ones who gain robe-cloth, alms-food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick. He exalts himself for being one who gains robe-cloth, alms-food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'It's not through gains that the quality of greed goes to its end; it's not through gains that the quality of aversion... the quality of delusion goes to its end. Even though one is not one who gains robe-cloth, alms-food, lodgings, & medicinal requisites for the sick, if — practicing the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, practicing masterfully — he is one who follows the Dhamma, he is to be honored for that, praised for that.' So, giving priority just to the practice, he neither exalts himself for his gains nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity is learned... a master of the Vinaya... a Dhamma-speaker. He notices, 'I am a Dhamma-speaker, but these other monks are not Dhamma-speakers. He exalts himself for being a Dhamma-speaker and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'It's not through being a Dhamma-speaker that the quality of greed goes to its end; it's not through being a Dhamma-speaker that the quality of aversion... the quality of delusion goes to its end. Even though one is not a Dhamma-speaker, if — practicing the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, practicing masterfully — he is one who follows the Dhamma, he is to be honored for that, praised for that.' So, giving priority just to the practice, he neither exalts himself for being a Dhamma-speaker nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity is a wilderness dweller. [1] He notices, 'I am a wilderness dweller, but these other monks are not wilderness dwellers.' He exalts himself for being a wilderness dweller and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'It's not through being a wilderness dweller that the quality of greed goes to its end; it's not through being a wilderness dweller that the quality of aversion... the quality of delusion goes to its end. Even though one is not a wilderness dweller, if — practicing the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, practicing masterfully — he is one who follows the Dhamma, he is to be honored for that, praised for that.' So, giving priority just to the practice, he neither exalts himself for being a wilderness dweller nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity is one who wears robes of thrown-away rags... an alms-goer... one who dwells at the root of a tree... a cemetery dweller... one who lives in the open air... one who doesn't lie down... one who is content with whatever dwelling is assigned to him... one who eats only one meal a day. He notices, 'I am one who eats only one meal a day, but these other monks do not eat only one meal a day.' He exalts himself for being one who eats only one meal a day and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'It's not through being one who eats only one meal a day that the quality of greed goes to its end; it's not through being one who eats only one meal a day that the quality of aversion... the quality of delusion goes to its end. Even though one is not one who eats only one meal a day, if — practicing the Dhamma in line with the Dhamma, practicing masterfully — he is one who follows the Dhamma, he is to be honored for that, praised for that.' So, giving priority just to the practice, he neither exalts himself for being one who eats only one meal a day nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity — secluded from sensuality, secluded from unskillful qualities, enters & remains in the first jhāna: rapture & pleasure born of seclusion, accompanied by directed thought & evaluation. He notices, 'I have gained the attainment of the first jhāna, but these other monks have not gained the attainment of the first jhāna.' He exalts himself for the attainment of the first jhāna and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"But a person of integrity notices, 'The Blessed One has spoken of non-fashioning [2] even with regard to the attainment of the first jhāna, for by whatever means they construe it, it becomes otherwise from that.' [3] So, giving priority to non-fashioning, he neither exalts himself for the attainment of the first jhāna nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"Furthermore, a person of no integrity... enters & remains in the second jhāna... the third jhāna... the fourth jhāna... the dimension of the infinitude of space... the dimension of the infinitude of consciousness... the dimension of nothingness... the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception. He notices, 'I have gained the attainment of the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception, but these other monks have not gained the attainment of the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception.' He exalts himself for the attainment of the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception and disparages others. This is the quality of a person of no integrity.

"A person of integrity notices, 'The Blessed One has spoken of non-fashioning even with regard to the attainment of the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception, for by whatever means they construe it, it becomes otherwise from that.' So, giving priority to non-fashioning, he neither exalts himself for the attainment of the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception nor disparages others. This is the quality of a person of integrity.

"A person of integrity, completely transcending the dimension of neither perception nor non-perception, enters & remains in the cessation of feeling & perception. When he sees with discernment, his effluents are ended. This is a monk who does not construe anything, does not construe anywhere, does not construe in any way."

That is what the Blessed One said. Gratified, the monks delighted in the Blessed One's words.


Notes

1. The nine practices mentioned here — being a wilderness dweller, one who wears robes of thrown-away rags, an alms-goer, one who dwells at the root of a tree, a cemetery dweller, one who lives in the open air, one who doesn't lie down, one who is content with whatever dwelling is assigned to him, or one who eats only one meal a day — are among the thirteen optional ascetic (dhutaṅga) practices that monks may undertake. The other four are: possessing only one set of the triple robe, bypassing no donors on one's almsround, eating only from one's bowl, and not accepting food brought after one's almsround. All thirteen practices are listed in Thag 16.7.

2. Atammayatā. For discussions of the role of non-fashioning in the practice, see
The Wings to Awakening, II/B http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... ml#part2-b
and III/G, http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... ml#part3-g
and The Paradox of Becoming, Chapter 6 http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... ofbecoming

3. In other words, whatever the condition of the ground on which one might base a state of becoming — a sense of one's self or the world one inhabits — by the time that state of becoming has taken shape, the ground has already changed. In this case, if one tries to shape a sense of self around one's attainment of jhāna, the attainment itself has already changed.


See also:
AN 2.31 Kataññu Suttas: Gratitude
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
AN 4.73 Sappurisa Sutta: A Person of Integrity
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
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Re: MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Aug 15, 2011 11:04 pm

MAJJHIMA NIKAYA III 2. 3. Sappurisasutta
(113) The Worthy One
Tanslated by Sister Upalavanna

http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pit ... isa-e.html

I heard thus. At one time the Blessed One lived in the monastery offered by Anàthapiïóika in Jeta's grove in Sàvatthi. The Blessed One addressed the bhikkhus from there. `Bhikkhus, I will tell the features of the Worthy one and the features of the unworthy one, listen and attend carefully.

Bhikkhus, what are the features of the worthy one? Here the unworthy one gone forth from a high clan reflects. I have gone forth homeless from a high clan, these others gone forth are not from high clans. On account of his high clan, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of high birth, these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone gone forth homeless from out side a high clan lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again, bhikkhus, the unworthy one gone forth from an esteemed clan , ... . re ... . gone forth from a high and esteemed clan, ... . re ... . gone forth from a noble clan reflects. I have gone forth homeless from a noble clan, these others gone forth are not from noble clans. On account of his noble clan, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of noble clan, these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone gone forth homeless from out side a noble clan lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one gone forth is well-known and famous, he reflects. I'm well-known and famous these others gone forth are not well-known and famous On account of his fame, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of fame, these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someonenot well-known and famous gone forth homeless lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is the gainer of robes, morsels, dwellings and requisites for the ill and he reflects. I'm a gainer of robes, morsels, dwellings and requisites for the ill, these others gone forth are not the gainers of the four requisites On account of this, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of gains, these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If some non gainer of robes, morsels, dwellings andrequisites for the ill, lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is learned, he reflects. I'm learned, these other bhikkhus are not learned On account of his learnedness, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of learnedness these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone not learned lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one bears the Discipline, he reflects. I bear the Discipline these other bhikkhus do not bear the Discipline. On account of his bearing the Discipline he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of bearing the Discipline these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone not a bearer of the Discipline lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is a preacher, he reflects. I'm a preacher these other bhikkhus are not preachers On account of his ability to preach he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of the ability to preach, these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone who is not a preacher lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is a forest dweller, he reflects. I'm aforest dweller these other bhikkhus are not forest dwellers On account of his dwelling in the forest he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of dwelling in the forest these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone not dwelling in the forest, lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is a rag robe wearer, he reflects. I'm a rag robe wearer these other bhikkhus are not rag robe wearers On account of his wearing rag robes he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of wearing rag robes these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone not wearing rag robes lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is a partaker of morsels, he reflects. I'm a partaker of morsels these other bhikkhus are not partakers of morsels. On account of his partaking morsels, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of partaking morsels these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone not partaking morsels, lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is a tree root dweller, he reflects. I'm atree root dweller, these other bhikkhus are not tree root dwellers On account of his dwelling at the root of a tree, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of dwelling at the root of a tree these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone not dwelling at the root of a tree, lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one

Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one is a dweller in a charnel ground, ... . re ... a dweller in the open, ... re ... one abiding in the sitting posture, re ... one sleeping wherever possible, ... re ... one sitting on the same seat, he reflects. I'm a sitter on the same seat, these other bhikkhus are not the sitters on the same seat. On account of his sitting on the same seat, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects on account of sitting on the same seat, these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someone not a sitter on the same seat, lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one

Again, bhikkhus, the unworthy one, secluded from sensual desires and things of demerit, with thoughts and thought processes, and with joy and pleasantness born of seclusion abides in the first jhàna. He reflects, I'm a gainer of the first jhàna, these other bhikkhus are not the gainers of the first jhàna. On account of his first jhàna he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects. The Blessed One has said, we should not cling to even the first jhàna. Whatever we imagine it turns to be otherwise. Giving the first preference to not clinging, he does not praise himself or disparage others, on account of the first jhàna. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one

.

Again, bhikkhus, the unworthy one, overcoming thoughts and thought processes, the mind internally appeased, in one point and with joy and pleasantness born of concentration abides in the second jhàna, ... re ... . in the third jhàna, ... re ... . in the fourth jhàna. He reflects, I'm a gainer of the forthjhàna, these other bhikkhus are not the gainers of the forth jhàna. On account of his forth jhàna he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects. The Blessed One has said, we should not cling to even the forth jhàna. Whatever we imagine it turns to be otherwise. Giving the first preference to not clinging, he does not praise himself or disparage others, on account of the forth jhàna. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one

Again, bhikkhus, the unworthy one, overcomingall perceptions of matter, all perceptions of anger and not attending to the varied perceptions, with space is boundless abides in the sphere of space. He reflects, I'm a gainer of the sphere of space, these other bhikkhus are not the gainers of the sphere of space. On account of his birth in the sphere of space he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects. The Blessed One has said, we should not cling to even the sphere of space. Whatever we imagine it turns to be otherwise. Giving the first preference to not clinging, he does not praise himself or disparage others, on account of the birth in the sphere of space. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again, bhikkhus, the unworthy one, overcomingall the sphere of space, with consciousness is boundless, attains to the sphere of consciousness. He reflects, I'm a gainer in the sphere of consciousness, these other bhikkhus are not the gainers in the sphere of consciousness. On account of his birth in the sphere of consciousness he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects. The Blessed One has said, we should not cling to even the sphere of consciousness. Whatever we imagine it turns to be otherwise. Giving the first preference to not clinging, he does not praise himself or disparage others, on account of the birth in the sphere of consciousness. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again, bhikkhus, the unworthy one, overcomingall the sphere of consciousness, with there is nothing attains to the sphere of nothingness. He reflects, I'm a gainer in the sphere of nothingness, these other bhikkhus are not the gainers in the sphere of nothingness. On account of his birth in the sphere of nothingness he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects. The Blessed One has said, we should not cling to even the sphere of nothingness. Whatever we imagine it turns to be otherwise. Giving the first preference to not clinging, he does not praise himself or disparage others, on account of the birth in the sphere of nothingness. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.

Again, bhikkhus, the unworthy one, overcomingall the sphere of nothingness, attains to neither perception nor non perception. He reflects, I'm a gainer of neither perception nor non perception, these other bhikkhus are not the gainers of neither perception nor non perception. On account of his birth in neither perception nor non perception he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one. The worthy one reflects. The Blessed One has said, we should not cling to even neither perception nor non perception. Whatever we imagine it turns to be otherwise. Giving the first preference to not clinging, he does not praise himself or disparage others, on account of the birth in neither perception nor non perception. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one

Again the worthy one overcoming all neither perceptions nor non perceptions, attains the cessation of perceptions and feelings. Seeing this with wisdom his desires too get destroyed. Here the bhikkhu does not imagine anything, to go anywhere, for any reason.

The Blessed One said thus and those bhikkhu delighted in the words of the Blessed One.
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Re: MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Aug 15, 2011 11:10 pm

There are strong parallels between this sutta and the two heartwood-simile suttas:

MN 29: The Major Discourse on Heartwood http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pit ... ta-e1.html
MN 30: The Shorter Discourse on the Simile of the Heartwood http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pit ... ta-e1.html

:anjali:
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Re: MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Aug 15, 2011 11:20 pm

Translation and Commentary on MN113 by Piya Tan:
http://dharmafarer.org/wordpress/wp-con ... 3-piya.pdf
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Re: MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Aug 22, 2011 10:07 am

" Moreover, an untrue man who is learned ... who is expert in the Discipline .. who is a preacher of the Dhamma .. who is a forest dweller .. who is a refuse-rag wearer .. an almsfood eater .. a tree-root dweller .. a charnel-ground dweller ... an open-air dweller .. a continual sitter .. an any-bed user .. a one-session eater consider thus: "I am a one-session eater but these other bhikkhus are not onesession eaters. So he lauds himself and disparages others because of his being a one-session eater. This too is the character of an untrue man."

BB: These are the names of the thirteen ascetic practices discussed in part II of the Visuddhimagga. The "continual sitter" observes the practice of never lying down, but sleeping in the sitting position.


"But a true man considers thus: 'Non-identification even with the attainment of the first jhana has been declared by the Blessed One: for in whatever way they conceive, the fact is other than that. So, putting non-identification first, he neither lauds himself or disparages others because of his attainment of the first jhana. This too is the character of a true man."

BB: MA explains "non-identification" (atammayata, lie. "not consisting of that") as the absence of craving. However, the context suggests that the absence of conceit may be the meaning.

The statement "for in whatever way they conceive, the fact is ever other than that" is a philosophical riddle appearing alsoa at:
Sutta Nipata 588 http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .irel.html
    "By not abandoning sorrow a being simply undergoes more suffering. Bewailing the dead he comes under the sway of sorrow. See other men faring according to their deeds! Hence beings tremble here with fear when they come into the power of death. Whatever they imagine, it (turns out) quite different from that.
Sutta Nipata 757 http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .irel.html
    "See how the world together with the devas has self-conceit for what is not-self. Enclosed by mind-and-body it imagines, 'This is real.' Whatever they imagine it to be, it is quite different from that. It is unreal, of a false nature and perishable. Nibbana, not false in nature, that the Noble Ones know as true. Indeed, by the penetration of the true, they are completely stilled and realize final deliverance.
Udana 3.10 http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
    This world is burning.
    Afflicted by contact,
    it calls disease a "self,"
    for by whatever means it construes [anything],
    that becomes otherwise from that.

MA is silent, but the Commentary to Ud 3.10 explains it to mean that in whatever way worldly people conceive any of the five aggregates --- as self for self's belonging, etc, --- the thing conceived turns out to be other than the aspect ascribed to it: it is not self or self's belonging, not "I" or "mine".
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Re: MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Aug 22, 2011 10:17 am

"Moreover, by completely surmounting the base of neither-perception-nor-non-perception, a true man enters upon and abides in the cessation of perception and feeling. And his taints are destroyed by his seeing with wisdom.

BB: It should be noted that there is no passage on the untrue man entering the cessation of perception and feeling. Unlike the jhanas and immaterial attainments, which can be attained by worldlings, cessation is the domain exclusively of non-returners and arahants.


"This bhikkhu does not conceive in regard to anything, he does not conceive in any way."

BB: This is a brief statement of the same situation described in full at MN 1.51-146.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
"
    A monk who is a Worthy One, devoid of mental fermentations — who has attained completion, finished the task, laid down the burden, attained the true goal, destroyed the fetters of becoming, and is released through right knowledge — directly knows earth as earth. Directly knowing earth as earth, he does not conceive things about earth, does not conceive things in earth, does not conceive things coming out of earth, does not conceive earth as 'mine,' does not delight in earth. Why is that? Because he has comprehended it, I tell you.
    ...

BB's note 6 spends more than a page on conceiving. The first paragraph:
The Pali verb "conceives" (mannati), from the root man, "to think", is often used in the Pali suttas to mean distortional thinking --- though that ascribes to it's object characteristics and a significance derived not from the object itself, but from one's own subjective imaginings. The cognitive distortion introduced by conceiving consists, in brief, in the intrusion of the egocentric perspective into the experience already slightly distorted by spontaneous perception. According to the commentaries, the activity of conceiving is governed by three defilements, which account for the different ways it comes to manifestation --- craving (tanha), conceit (mana), and views (ditthi).
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Re: MN 113: Sappurisa Sutta — A Person of Integrity

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Aug 24, 2011 9:17 am

Interesting to compare
MN29 http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pit ... ta-e1.html
Here, bhikkhus, a certain son of a clansman victimised by birth, decay and death leaves the household out of faith and becomes a homeless thinking I am submerged in grief, lament, unpleasantness, displeasure, distress and death, saying only a few declare the complete ending of this mass of unpleasantness. Gone forth thus, he is reborn in gain, honour and fame. Satisfied with it, his desires fulfilled with that gain, honour and fame, he praises himself and disparages others. I am a gainer of hospitality, these other bhikkhus are impotent and not wise. He becomes intoxicated and negligent on account of that gain honour and fame and abides in unpleasantness.

Like a man in need of heartwood, wandering in search of heartwood, coming to a standing tree with heartwood would ignore the heartwood, sapwood, bark and shoots, and cutting the branches and leaves would carry them away thinking it's the heartwood. - A wise man seeing him would say: This good man does not know the heartwood, sapwood, bark, shoots, branches or leaves. So this man in need of heartwood, wandering in search of heartwood, coming to a standing tree with heartwood has ignored the heartwood, sapwood, bark and shoots. He has cut the branches and leaves and is carrying them away thinking that it is the heartwood, Whatever work he has to do with the heartwood, to that he would not come.

MN30 http://www.metta.lk/tipitaka/2Sutta-Pit ... ta-e1.html
Brahmin, a certain person leaving his household would go forth as a homeless out of faith thinking I am submerged in birth, decay, death, grief lament unpleasantness and distress. It is only a few that declare the complete ending of unpleasanatness. Gone forth thus, he is reborn in gain, honour and fame. He neither satisfied with it nor his desires fulfilled, does not praise himself nor disparage others. He arouses interest and makes effort to realise something more exalted than gain, honour and fame. Not infatuated nor lethargic takes upon himself the endowment of virtues. Satisfied with it and his desires fulfilled praises himself and disparages others. I'm virtuous these other bhikkhus are with evil demerit. He does not arouse interest nor make effort to realise something more exalted than the endowment of virtues.

Like a man wandering in search of heartwood would come to a standing huge tree with heartwood. He would ignore its heartwood, sapwood and bark. Would cut the shoots and carry them away thinking it is the heartwood. For whatever purpose he needs the heartwood, to that he would not come. Brahmin, I say, this person is comparable to that.


MN113:
Again bhikkhus, the unworthy one gone forth is well-known and famous, he reflects. I'm well-known and famous these others gone forth are not well-known and famous On account of his fame, he praises himself and disparages others. This is a feature of the unworthy one.

The worthy one reflects on account of fame, these greedy things, angry things and deluded things do not get destroyed. If someonenot well-known and famous gone forth homeless lives according to the Teaching, following the right conduct, he would become honourable and praiseworthy, on account of that. He honours the right conduct and does not praise himself or disparage others. Bhikkhus this is a feature of the worthy one.


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Mike
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