Is this quote genuine?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism
User avatar
Upasaka Sumana
Posts: 885
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 2:53 pm
Location: Manchester, UK
Contact:

Is this quote genuine?

Postby Upasaka Sumana » Sun Sep 11, 2011 3:46 pm

“Let us rise up and be thankful, for if we didn't learn a lot today, at least we learned a little, and if we didn't learn a little, at least we didn't get sick, and if we got sick, at least we didn't die; so, let us all be thankful.”

http://thinkexist.com/quotation/let_us_ ... 99980.html


Was this really said by the Buddha, or is this one of those quotes wrongly attributed to him?
My motto, philosophy, and guiding principle: You should do what’s good, Stephen. You should do what’s good. Always choose whatever is good.

nameless
Posts: 164
Joined: Tue Jul 27, 2010 2:25 pm

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby nameless » Sun Sep 11, 2011 3:59 pm

Sounds uncharacteristic.

Sickness and death are inevitable. As long as there is birth, there is sickness and death. An example of sickness in the suttas is as follows:

(2) And further, monks, a monk reflects thus: "I am now free from sickness, free from disease, my digestive power functions smoothly, my constitution is not too cool and not too hot, it is balanced and fit for making effort. But a time will come when this body will be in the grip of sickness. And one who is sick cannot easily contemplate upon the Teachings of the Buddha; it is not easy for him, to live in the wilderness or a forest or jungle, or in secluded dwellings. Before this undesirable condition, so unpleasant and disagreeable, approaches me, prior to that, let me muster my energy for achieving the unachieved, for attaining the unattained, for realizing the unrealized, so that, in the possession of that state, I shall live happily even in sickness."
— AN 5:78

Sickness is recognized as an inevitability, and we are offered advice for how to conduct ourselves when we are healthy, and not merely be 'grateful' for not being sick.

User avatar
BubbaBuddhist
Posts: 640
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:55 am
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
Contact:

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby BubbaBuddhist » Sun Sep 11, 2011 6:43 pm

Sounds more like Saint Francis or Meister Eckhart doesn't it?

M4
Author of Redneck Buddhism: or Will You Reincarnate as Your Own Cousin?

User avatar
Kim OHara
Posts: 3460
Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:47 am
Location: North Queensland, Australia

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby Kim OHara » Sun Sep 11, 2011 9:53 pm

I'm voting it is non-Buddhist. Two reasons:
1. "Rise up and be thankful"? Thankful to who?
2. Searching for a phrase from the quote got me a lot of junky 'famous quotation' sites and no Buddhist sites, and none of the attributions were more specific than 'The Buddha', i.e. no sutta/sutra references.

:namaste:
Kim

User avatar
Ben
Site Admin
Posts: 17088
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:49 am
Location: War.loun.dig.er.ler
Contact:

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby Ben » Sun Sep 11, 2011 10:39 pm

Hi Stefan
Good question. One needs to be very careful of quotes appended with "- Buddha".
All sorts of new age rubbish is attributed to the Buddha. On one facebook group which is populated by a number of very enthusiastic quotation regurgitators I have started asking probing questions such as "Can you provide a citation for that quote?"
kind regards

Ben
“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com..

User avatar
BubbaBuddhist
Posts: 640
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 5:55 am
Location: Knoxville, Tennessee
Contact:

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby BubbaBuddhist » Sun Sep 11, 2011 10:46 pm

Ben you should post on those websites this quote:

"Of whom do you know, foolish man, that I have taught to him the teaching in that manner? " --The Buddha


( From the Snake Simile Alagaddupama Sutta (MN 22) )

M4
Author of Redneck Buddhism: or Will You Reincarnate as Your Own Cousin?

User avatar
Ben
Site Admin
Posts: 17088
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 12:49 am
Location: War.loun.dig.er.ler
Contact:

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby Ben » Sun Sep 11, 2011 10:52 pm

Ah thank you, M4, that is perfect!
kind regards
Ben
“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com..

User avatar
retrofuturist
Posts: 15729
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby retrofuturist » Fri Jan 27, 2012 11:26 pm

Greetings,

withing wrote:pain can be managed via convincing the mind that it isn't real.

Not so much that, but placing attention elsewhere.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"When we transcend one level of truth, the new level becomes what is true for us. The previous one is now false. What one experiences may not be what is experienced by the world in general, but that may well be truer. (Ven. Nanananda)

“I hope, Anuruddha, that you are all living in concord, with mutual appreciation, without disputing, blending like milk and water, viewing each other with kindly eyes.” (MN 31)

Never again...

User avatar
Modus.Ponens
Posts: 2364
Joined: Sat Jan 03, 2009 2:38 am
Location: Gallifrey

Re: Is this quote genuine?

Postby Modus.Ponens » Sat Jan 28, 2012 8:38 am

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings,

withing wrote:pain can be managed via convincing the mind that it isn't real.

Not so much that, but placing attention elsewhere.

Metta,
Retro. :)


Or, paying attention to pain with equanimity, recognizing it's not suffering, just sensation.
He turns his mind away from those phenomena, and having done so, inclines his mind to the property of deathlessness: 'This is peace, this is exquisite — the resolution of all fabrications; the relinquishment of all acquisitions; the ending of craving; dispassion; cessation; Unbinding.'
(Jhana Sutta - Thanissaro Bhikkhu translation)


Return to “General Theravāda discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot], Bundokji, Yahoo [Bot] and 7 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine