Not-self, impermanent, and Dhamma in Devanāgarī/Pali

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Not-self, impermanent, and Dhamma in Devanāgarī/Pali

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Sun Apr 01, 2012 12:19 am

Hello there, I'm editing a pamphlet for someone on Buddhism and he asked if I could get a Devanāgarī script for the words Anatta, Anicca, and Dhamma to use as headings. How would those best be represented in script? Thanks a lot!
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.
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Re: Not-self, impermanent, and Dhamma in Devanāgarī/Pali

Postby SamKR » Sun Apr 01, 2012 5:54 am

LonesomeYogurt wrote:Hello there, I'm editing a pamphlet for someone on Buddhism and he asked if I could get a Devanāgarī script for the words Anatta, Anicca, and Dhamma to use as headings. How would those best be represented in script? Thanks a lot!


Roman
Devanāgarī

anattā
अनत्ता

aniccā
अनिच्चा

anicca
अनिच्च

dhamma
धम्म
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Re: Not-self, impermanent, and Dhamma in Devanāgarī/Pali

Postby cavan » Wed May 30, 2012 8:41 pm

Hi SamKR (or anyone else that can help for that matter),

I have been looking into the correct Devanāgarī rendering over the internet and came across this post. Everywhere I see it cited as anicca and the given script is अनिच्चा (even on wikipedia - the fountain of truth and knowledge ;) )

But here you have posted that this is in fact aniccā and the script for anicca is different (अनिच्च). You took the time to include them both. Why is that? As a stand alone words how do these variations differs in their nuance of meaning?

Thanks in advance!
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