Tantra II

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation

Re: Tantra II

Postby pink_trike » Sun Apr 26, 2009 9:36 pm

The beauty of Theravada is that when we stumble on the path, we can always pick ourselves back up and start again in this moment - mindfulness. There are 4 types of mindfulness (satipatthana):

1. on the body
2. on the feelings
3. on the mind
4. on the true nature of things.

It is best to start with #1 - specifically with breath awareness. This may also be the most beneficial way to dissolve lung.

- seek a secluded, quiet space
- sit down, quiet the mind.
- cross your legs
- keep your body erect
- bring your attention to your breath as it naturally moves in and out the nostrils. Note the sensation at the tip of the nostrils as the breath moves in and out.

Then, inhale slowly and deeply, filling first the lower abdomen, then the middle abdomen, then the lungs - gently until the collar bones rise slightly. Hold the breath there for a count of 5, then gently, slowly, release the breath in the opposite order - first the lungs, then the middle abdomen, then the lower abdomen.

Pause, and repeat the process, - 5 times (beginner), 10 times (intermediate) and 20 times (when 10 times is comfortable).. Never strain. If you have feelings of light-headness, return the attention to normal breathing - observing the sensations at the tip of the nostrils.

When finished, sit and observe the quieting effect on the mind.

Once this practice is learned and applied as a regular practice, a solid foundation is prepared to developing the other three types of mindfulness. Once all 4 types of mindfulness practices have been learned and applied, we can move on to deeper awareness practices.

Best of luck in your continued recovery. :anjali:
Vision is Mind
Mind is Empty
Emptiness is Clear Light
Clear Light is Union
Union is Great Bliss

- Dawa Gyaltsen

---

Disclaimer: I'm a non-religious practitioner of Theravada, Mahayana/Vajrayana, and Tibetan Bon Dzogchen mind-training.
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Re: Tantra II

Postby Dan74 » Mon Apr 27, 2009 10:34 am

Dear Dave,

I think the exercises PT mentioned above should help you with your healing, but if I were in your position I would seek out a solid reputable Vajrayana teacher who already has former NKT students and who would understand your problems when you mention them.

Your problems result from incorrect application of Vajrayana and it only makes sense that they will be set right with correct application of it under an insightful and compassionate teacher.

Good luck!!!

And much metta :heart:

_/|\_
_/|\_
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Re: Tantra II

Postby Chantelle » Fri May 22, 2009 7:58 pm

I would appreciate some input on an experience I had recently. I spent 3 sessions with a "Tantric / Kundalini" master with 27 years experience. He told me after the 3rd time that I am not to contact him anymore. That I have too much heat and fire. And that was that. We'd had wonderful conversation during and in between sessions. I have to admit after the last session I felt like I'd short circuited and it took me awhile to get myself grounded and realigned again. I would appreciate any ideas or advice in this area.

Thanks!
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Re: Tantra II

Postby Aloka » Sat May 23, 2009 9:01 am

.

Dear Davcuts,

You said :
If someone breaks their vows or samaya it can lead to rebirth in hell.


I'm a Vajrayana practitioner myself (although I'm also very keen to know more about Theravada)

I once read a text by a revered dead Tibetan guru which mentioned that it was said that if one has received a single word of teaching of a master and doesn't respect the master, then one will be reborn 500 times as a dog and then as a miserable human being.
For a number of reasons it didn't make any sense to me - so I asked my Tibetan teacher if he believed it too. He said "Maybe it's mental " and that made perfect sense to me because personally I believe that the six realms -as shown in the Tibetan wheel of life http://www.buddhanet.net/wheel2.htm - are our mental states and also places we humans create on this planet - and not other places somewhere else.

I think it's not very useful to be beating ourselves up imagining terrible retributions for past mistakes. This doesn't help us to relax and remain in the freshness of the present moment. It's good to meditate.

Don't worry. Be well and happy.

With kind wishes to you.

Dazzle
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Re: Tantra II

Postby mudra » Sat Jun 06, 2009 9:33 am

Chantelle wrote:I would appreciate some input on an experience I had recently. I spent 3 sessions with a "Tantric / Kundalini" master with 27 years experience. He told me after the 3rd time that I am not to contact him anymore. That I have too much heat and fire. And that was that. We'd had wonderful conversation during and in between sessions. I have to admit after the last session I felt like I'd short circuited and it took me awhile to get myself grounded and realigned again. I would appreciate any ideas or advice in this area.

Thanks!


Are you asking in a Buddhist context or general? Kundalini is not really a Buddhist tantric term or context, more of Hindu yoga thing. In Buddhist tantras there is work with winds but not in the same way as the Hindu Kundalini thing. Perhaps this master was into something a bit different?
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Re: Tantra II

Postby gingercatni » Sat Feb 26, 2011 12:03 pm

[/quote]

I came here to get another perspective on tantra. I was having doubts about how authentic it is. Even stating so got me a good scolding on another Buddhist website. According to some I should not even have doubts, much less talk about them openly. I wanted to know why tantra is not taught in Theravada Buddhism. I was also having doubt if I wanted to continue to practice Tibetan Buddhism. In a lot of ways it seems Theravada is more for me. But it seems Theravada Buddhist don't believe in prayer, rituals, or other deities such as Tara, and Amitabha. Is this correct? If it is then I can't see myself converting to Theravada any time soon.

Take care,
David[/quote]

Hi David,

your post is quite old, you have probably sorted out what way you want to go. But to add my view, I will always identify myself as a Theravada Buddhist, however I do believe in Tara. I'm not sure how I came to find her or if Tara found me who knows, but as to whether these Buddha's and deities exist, when we look at the 31 realms of existance the fact devas and brahmans exist here to, why should the likes of Tara not exist there ? So you can always follow buddhism in way that works for you no matter what other people here say. :meditate:
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