Letting observation choose its focus

Discussion of Satipatthana bhavanā and Vipassana bhavana.

Re: Letting observation choose its focus

Postby SamKR » Sat Apr 28, 2012 3:06 am

Alex123 wrote:Hello all,

Satipatthana sutta does not seem to tell "you have to deliberately focus only on this first, then focus on 2nd, then on 3rd, etc" .


Yes, it does not seem to tell that but it also does not prohibit this, and there seems to be no harm in doing it one by one if one finds that works for him/her. To me Satipatthana sutta seems to incorporate teachings for all kinds of people (beginner to the more advanced), and retro's four-point satipatthana model ("progressively more advanced means") seems valid.
But I agree with your argument too; however, I think that will apply easily for people who are at that level. Also Thanks for the quote about impermanence.
Last edited by SamKR on Sat Apr 28, 2012 3:10 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Letting observation choose its focus

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Apr 28, 2012 3:10 am

Hi Sam,

Sure, these Suttas are interpreted in various ways by various teachers and practitioners. I think that the key thing is how it relates to your experience and what use you can make of it. I explained how that passage resonates with my experience.

:anjali:
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Re: Letting observation choose its focus

Postby SamKR » Sat Apr 28, 2012 3:18 am

mikenz66 wrote:Hi Sam,

Sure, these Suttas are interpreted in various ways by various teachers and practitioners. I think that the key thing is how it relates to your experience and what use you can make of it. I explained how that passage resonates with my experience.

:anjali:
Mike

Hello Mike,

Thanks for your replies. I think I understand your point. I agree that "the key thing is how it relates to our experience and what use you can make of it." Well said.
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Re: Letting observation choose its focus

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Apr 28, 2012 4:41 am

And, thinking about it, what I'm talking about doesn't necessarily contradict what you are saying, since the ability to be "just aware that something is happening" could be described as a "somewhat advanced" practice which requires some work to get to.

:anjali:
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Re: Letting observation choose its focus

Postby Alex123 » Sat Apr 28, 2012 2:19 pm

mikenz66 wrote:And, thinking about it, what I'm talking about doesn't necessarily contradict what you are saying, since the ability to be "just aware that something is happening" could be described as a "somewhat advanced" practice which requires some work to get to.
:anjali:
Mike


Hello Mike, yes to be just aware without focusing is very advanced. No wonder that in other schools of Buddhism it is part of most advanced in their practices.

But I believe that this "no-control" is very helpful because you are not trying to interfere which often can be merely lobha or dosa, and in my experience it has shown anatta better (though I have a long way to go). Yes it is more subtle practice and some know-how might be needed.

Focusing on one thing to the exclusion of others is good for samatha (which can be needed in some circumstances), but hinders vipassanā which needs to see cause-effect relationship (which requires seeing two or more things at once).
I was not; I was; I am not; I do not care."
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