Pali explanation of Anatta

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LonesomeYogurt
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Pali explanation of Anatta

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Tue May 08, 2012 1:05 am

Hello there, I'm looking for a way to restate or summarize the concept of anatta in Pali, just in a simple phrase. Is there a possible way to say something along the lines of "I am free from self," "There is no I," or "This is not me?" Almost like a bumper-sticker phrase to sum up what anatta means without using the term to define itself, you know?

Any help would be appreciated!
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.

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bodom
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Re: Pali explanation of Anatta

Postby bodom » Tue May 08, 2012 1:27 am

Here is the stock passage found within the suttas:

'This is not mine, this is not I, this is not my self.'


Anatta-lakkhana Sutta: The Discourse on the Not-self Characteristic
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .nymo.html

:anjali:
This is our foundation: to have sati, recollection, and sampajañña, self-awareness, whether standing, walking, sitting, or reclining. Whatever arises, just leave it be, don't cling to it. Be it like or dislike, happiness or suffering, doubt or certainty... Don't try to label everything, just know it. See that all the things that arise in the mind are simply sensations. They are transient. They arise, exist and cease. That's all there is to them, they have no self or being, they are neither ''us'' nor ''them.'' They are not worthy of clinging to, any of them. - Ajahn Chah

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LonesomeYogurt
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Re: Pali explanation of Anatta

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Tue May 08, 2012 1:32 am

Perfect! Now if someone could only point out how "This is not mine, this is not I, this is not myself." would be rendered in Pali?
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.

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mikenz66
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Location: New Zealand

Re: Pali explanation of Anatta

Postby mikenz66 » Tue May 08, 2012 2:55 am

If you go to the link cited and click on "S iii 66" at the top, you get the Pali.

However, that may not be useful.
If you go here:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... tml#anatta
you get Pali and English.
"Yam-panāniccaṃ dukkhaṃ vipariṇāma-dhammaṃ,
Kallaṃ nu taṃ samanupassituṃ,
Etaṃ mama eso'ham-asmi eso me attāti."

"And is it fitting to regard what is inconstant, stressful, subject to change as:
'This is mine. This is my self. This is what I am'?"


:anjali:
Mike

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LonesomeYogurt
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Location: America

Re: Pali explanation of Anatta

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Tue May 08, 2012 3:53 am

mikenz66 wrote:If you go to the link cited and click on "S iii 66" at the top, you get the Pali.

However, that may not be useful.
If you go here:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... tml#anatta
you get Pali and English.


:anjali:
Mike[/quote]

So "Evam-etaṃ yathābhūtaṃ sammappaññāya daṭṭhabbaṃ" would be "This is not mine. This is not my self. This is not what I am?" But I know that sammappannaya is "with right discernment" right? So are the two phrases kinda inexorably linked? In which case, would it be possible to simply have the Pali for "This is not my self. This is not what I am?" Or is it impossible to simply render it like that?

Thanks for the help everyone!
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.

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Dmytro
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Location: Kyiv, Ukraine
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Re: Pali explanation of Anatta

Postby Dmytro » Tue May 08, 2012 4:28 am

LonesomeYogurt wrote:In which case, would it be possible to simply have the Pali for "This is not my self. This is not what I am?"


'netaṃ mama, neso'hamasmi, na meso attā'

Best wishes, Dmytro


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