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American (Western) Folk Buddhism - Page 2 - Dhamma Wheel

American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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Kusala
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Kusala » Sat Jun 23, 2012 1:17 am

This thread reminded me of an article by Ajahn Geoff.



http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... ening.html
Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

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gavesako
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby gavesako » Wed Jul 25, 2012 8:08 am

A very interesting article about the Western Secular Buddhism and why it is different from traditional Asian Buddhism:


Psychoanalysis and American Folk Buddhism

A Buddhism colored by Western psychoanalysis is a Buddhism turned inward, concerned with the mind. This probably differentiates Western Folk Buddhism from most Asian Folk Buddhisms, which tend to be more outwardly directed, toward ritual and community observances, toward lore and toward ethics.
In practical terms people in the West generally come to Buddhism because life has been difficult. When Buddhism is popularly thought of in terms of psychotherapy this makes Buddhism that much more attractive. However then people relate to Buddhism as patients and Buddhist centers become something like hospitals, or at least outpatient clinics. In short, Western Buddhist communities are generally places of cure, Asian are places of refuge. ...

http://bhikkhucintita.wordpress.com/201 ... ddhism-16/

:reading:
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
- Sutta translations

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gavesako
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby gavesako » Fri Jul 27, 2012 6:34 pm

In the last article of this series, the author says:

Distinguishing between Essential and Folk Buddhism provides a framework for understanding and monitoring the process by which Buddhism is being assimilated into the Western cultural context. Ideally this process will:

(1) maintain the functional integrity of Essential Buddhism at all costs,

(2) establish the authority of Essential Buddhism over Folk Buddhism and

(3) result in a wholesome Western Folk Buddhism.

The integrity of Essential Buddhism is threatened by the assumption common in Western circles that adapting Buddhism to the West is a matter of stripping Buddhism willy-nilly of Asian cultural accretions in order to make it look more Western. This aesthetic would include, for instance, getting rid of rituals, robes, bowing, chanting (at least in foreign tongues), non-productive lifestyles and so on, not to mention renunciation. However, distinguishing between Essential and Folk Buddhisms highlights the danger of throwing out the baby with the bathwater, of hacking away at the corn when trying to remove the underbrush. Essential Buddhism is the baby, Folk Buddhism the bathwater. The functional role of any culturally arisen features of a transmitted Essential Buddhism is preserved only by leaving it intact or replaced by Western-looking counterparts. History seems to favor leaving such things intact, tending to lend Essential Buddhism an archaic flavor, for instance as retained in gestures of respect and in monastic garb.


http://bhikkhucintita.wordpress.com/201 ... ddhism-17/
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
- Sutta translations

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Kim OHara
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Location: North Queensland, Australia

Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Kim OHara » Fri Jul 27, 2012 10:30 pm


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Spiny Norman
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Spiny Norman » Sat Jul 28, 2012 1:57 pm

"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
Dairy Lama

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Spiny Norman
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Spiny Norman » Sat Jul 28, 2012 1:59 pm

"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
Dairy Lama

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Spiny Norman
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Re: American (Western) Folk Buddhism

Postby Spiny Norman » Sat Jul 28, 2012 2:03 pm

"My religion is very simple - my religion is ice-cream."
Dairy Lama


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