The Four Bhanavaras

Discussion of ordination, the Vinaya and monastic life. How and where to ordain? Bhikkhuni ordination etc.
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Hickersonia
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The Four Bhanavaras

Postby Hickersonia » Thu Aug 30, 2012 2:39 pm

I'm sure in posting this I'm showing some level of ignorance -- I post in hopes that someone can help me rectify that. :)

I have recently started reading Thanissaro Bhikkhu's "The Buddhist Monastic Code I" and on page 39 came across a brief summary of some texts / chants that must be learned by one intending to fully ordain. I'm having a little trouble finding references online to "The Four Bhanavaras," and am curious if anyone knows anything more about this that could help me identify them in case I wish to read through them at some point.

A google search brought me to this, "Vinaya Texts" by Rhys Davis and Herman Oldenberg:
http://books.google.com/books?id=q__JFBpeLGgC&pg

Is this, or something like it, what I should be looking for?

I appreciate any insight offered on this. Thank you! :)
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Re: The Four Bhanavaras

Postby daverupa » Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:40 pm

bhanavara means "recitation section", while a bhanaka is a reciter; "dighabhanaka, majjhimabhanaka", and so forth, if I understand correctly.
    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting oneself one protects others? By the pursuit, development, and cultivation of the four establishments of mindfulness. It is in such a way that by protecting oneself one protects others.

    "And how is it, bhikkhus, that by protecting others one protects oneself? By patience, harmlessness, goodwill, and sympathy. It is in such a way that by protecting others one protects oneself.
- Sedaka Sutta [SN 47.19]

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Re: The Four Bhanavaras

Postby Cittasanto » Thu Aug 30, 2012 3:49 pm

Hi Hickersonia,

are you sure it is that page?
I have a PDF version and only see things relevant to taking dependence.

bhāṇavāra is a section of the scriptures, containing 8,000 letters, but I do not know what you could be refering to precisely other than sections of the ordination, of which I am doubtful due to its meaning? if you could quote the part you are referring to as BMC1 & 2 do not seam to have this word in it.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
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"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: The Four Bhanavaras

Postby Hickersonia » Fri Aug 31, 2012 3:41 am

Cittasanto wrote:are you sure it is that page?
I have a PDF version and only see things relevant to taking dependence..


My book and the PDF version I found do not quite match, apparently. It appears I have the "Revised Edition."

The text I'm referring to is on page 40 in the PDF version found here:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... o/bmc1.pdf

I didn't even think about it that there were at least two editions of this book floating about... sorry about that!

Thanks. :)
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Re: The Four Bhanavaras

Postby Cittasanto » Fri Aug 31, 2012 5:41 am

Hickersonia wrote:
Cittasanto wrote:are you sure it is that page?
I have a PDF version and only see things relevant to taking dependence..


My book and the PDF version I found do not quite match, apparently. It appears I have the "Revised Edition."

The text I'm referring to is on page 40 in the PDF version found here:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... o/bmc1.pdf

I didn't even think about it that there were at least two editions of this book floating about... sorry about that!

Thanks. :)

Ajahn Thanissaro asked that the earlier work be Burned as it has some big mistakes within it.

a set of auspicious chants that are still regularly memorized in Sri Lanka as the Maha-parit potha.

if you do a search you will find it, but it is my understanding that these chants are not standard and different monasteries have different texts included, and are also known as Parita chants.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Re: The Four Bhanavaras

Postby Hickersonia » Fri Aug 31, 2012 11:43 am

Cittasanto wrote:if you do a search you will find it, but it is my understanding that these chants are not standard and different monasteries have different texts included, and are also known as Parita chants.


Interesting indeed. :)

When I first saw "The Four Bhanavaras," I assumed it was a four-volume scriptural text.

I did find a list of Parita chants, a couple of which I already know and others I've read but not committed to memory. It is fair to say that this is what is what BMC1 is referring to, at least in part, as "The Four Bhanavaras?"

1. Sarana-gama ("Going for Refuge") Khp 1
2. Dasa-sikkhapada ("Ten Training Precepts") Khp 2
3. Samanera-pañha ("Novice Questions") Khp 4
4. Dvattimsakara ("32 Body Parts") Khp 3
5. Paccavekkhana ("Reflections on Monastic Requisites") MN 2 (excerpt), passim
6. Dasa-dhamma Sutta ("Ten Dhamma Discourse") AN 10.48
7. Mahamangala Sutta ("Great Blessings Discourse") Khp 5, Sn 2.4
8. Ratana Sutta ("Three Treasures Discourse") Khp 6, Sn 2.1
9. Karaniya Metta Sutta ("Lovingkindness Discourse") Khp 9, Sn 1.8
10. Khandha-paritta ("Aggregates Protection") AN 4.67
11. Metta-anisamsa ("Lovingkindness Advantages Discourse") AN 11.16
12. Mitta-anisamsa ("Friendship Advantages Discourse") Ja 538
13. Mora-paritta ("The Peacock's Protection") Ja 159
14. Canda-paritta ("The Moon's Protection") SN 2.9
15. Suriya-paritta ("The Sun's Protection") SN 2.10
16. Dhajagga-paritta ("Banner Protection") SN 11.3
17. Mahakassapa Thera Bojjhanga ("Elder Maha Kassapa's Factors of Awakening") SN 46.14 (Gilana Sutta I)
18. Mahamoggallana Thera Bojjhanga ("Elder Maha Moggalana's Factors of Awakening") SN 46.15 (Gilana Sutta II)
19. Mahacunda Thera Bojjhanga ("Elder Maha Cunda's Factors of Awakening") SN 46.16 (Gilana Sutta III)
20. Girimananda Sutta ("To Girimananda Discourse") AN 10.60
21. Isigili Sutta ("About Isigili Discourse") MN 116
22. Dhammacakkappavattana Sutta ("Setting in Motion the Dhamma Wheel Discourse") SN 46.11
23. Maha-samaya Sutta ("The Great Assembly Discourse") DN 20
24. Alavaka Sutta ("Concerning Alavaka Discourse") SN 46.11
25. Kasi Bharadvaja Sutta ("Farmer Bharadvaja Discourse") Sn 1.4
26. Parabhava Sutta ("On Ruin Discourse") Sn 1.6
27. Vasala Sutta ("On Outcasts Discourse") Sn 1.7
28. Sacca-vibhanga Sutta ("Analysis of the Truth Discourse") MN 141
29. Atanatiya Sutta ("Atanatiya Discourse") DN 32

Thanks :)
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Re: The Four Bhanavaras

Postby Cittasanto » Fri Aug 31, 2012 9:09 pm

Hickersonia wrote:Interesting indeed. :)

When I first saw "The Four Bhanavaras," I assumed it was a four-volume scriptural text.

I would agree that that is a good assumption, but remember that this is dealing with the commentary literature, so a specific understanding would be meant not necesarily an understanding which all agree on as BMC1 notes I will swing back to this in a moment or two.

This definition of learned is not universally accepted, and some traditions have reworked it. As this is another area where different Communities have different interpretations, the wise policy is to adhere to the practice followed in one’s Community, as long as it follows the basic requirements in the Canon, mentioned above.


I did find a list of Parita chants, a couple of which I already know and others I've read but not committed to memory. It is fair to say that this is what is what BMC1 is referring to, at least in part, as "The Four Bhanavaras?"

personally I would rely on Venerable Ānandajoti Bhikkhu work found here for a reference! http://ancient-buddhist-texts.net/Texts ... /index.htm and the introduction may help explain things here somewhat.
Undoubtedly the best known collection of Buddhist texts in Sri Lanka is the
Catubhàõavàrapàëi, the Text of the Four Recitals.1 On any given day of the year one
would not have to go very far to find a complete recital of these texts being made,
usually by monks, in an all-night sitting, as the Buddhist community regards such a
recital as being particularly auspicious, and believes it brings safety, peace, and wellbeing
in its wake.

NOTE
In Sinhala the book is also known as the Piruvànà Pot Vahanse (The Venerable
Recitation Book); and the Mahà Pirit Pota (The Book of the Great Safeguards).


personally regarding "learning" (just to swing back) I would say the minimum requisite for "learning" (regarding this definition of this term) would be the same for not knowing the rules being an excuse for breaking them as found in pācittiyā 73
[quote="page 373 of BMC1 pdf]To summarize the Vibhanga: If a bhikkhu—when the recitation of the Patimokkha comes to a rule he has violated—tries to excuse himself through the sort of pretence cited in the rule, he immediately incurs a dukkata if he has already listened to the Patimokkha in full three times or more.[/quote]
so personally I believe the minimum for learning regarding the scriptures would be hearing four of the collections in full three or more times (as a strict interpretation) although seeing as the collections we have now in relatively new and the arrangement was different at one time (one of the chapters of Sn -i believe to be the eights???) is mentioned within the canon) it may be wise to be lenient with how much learning is actually required, and play on the safe side of knowing a selection such as the ones you quoted. so long as it met a wide enough range of teachings & length.
I could say more because I feal the subject of that term is valuable and nuanced more than I have expressed here.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."


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