Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

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Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

Postby m0rl0ck » Mon Sep 24, 2012 2:43 am

It seems to me that "revulsion" as it is used below cant be the common everyday revulsion as the term is usually used, because revulsion is aversion and aversion is attachment.

Bhikkhus, the seven factors of awakening, when developed and cultivated, lead to utter revulsion, to cessation, to peace, to direct knowledge, to bodhi, to nibbana. SN v 82


So my question is what is the pali term translated here as "revulsion" and are there alternate translations of the pali term?

Thanks
"When you meditate, don't send your mind outside. Don't fasten onto any knowledge at all. Whatever knowledge you've gained from books or teachers, don't bring it in to complicate things. Cut away all preoccupations, and then as you meditate let all your knowledge come from what's going on in the mind. When the mind is quiet, you'll know it for yourself. But you have to keep meditating a lot. When the time comes for things to develop, they'll develop on their own. Whatever you know, have it come from your own mind.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai ... eleft.html
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Re: Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

Postby Hanzze » Mon Sep 24, 2012 2:46 am

Ground explained it (the issue) very well some days ago. Letting go of things, do not aspect them as useful, can somehow seems to be leaded by aversion for "normal" people. Maybe I find his words.

It was in regard of "aversion" about sexual contact:

ground wrote:I would not express it that way. It is just that (sex) pleasure is becoming unattractive if one follows the teachings of the Buddha in a certain way. If one finds it unattractive and expresses this with speech those clinging to (sex) pleasure may perceive this to be aversion or morally judgemental. But that misperception is only the consequence of language perception being merged with feelings.
Just that! *smile*
...We Buddhists must find the courage to leave our temples and enter the temples of human experience, temples that are filled with suffering. If we listen to Buddha, Christ, or Gandhi, we can do nothing else. The refugee camps, the prisons, the ghettos, and the battlefields will become our temples. We have so much work to do. ... Peace is Possible! Step by Step. - Samtach Preah Maha Ghosananda "Step by Step" http://www.ghosananda.org/bio_book.html

BUT! it is important to become a real Buddhist first. Like Punna did: Punna Sutta Nate sante baram sokham _()_
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Re: Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Sep 24, 2012 3:24 am

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Re: Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Mon Sep 24, 2012 3:35 am

m0rl0ck wrote:So my question is what is the pali term translated here as "revulsion" and are there alternate translations of the pali term?

Thanks

The Pali term is "nibbidaa" and it is often rendered as "disenchantment" or "disillusion" as well as the more dramatic "revulsion."
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta

Stuff I write about things.
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Re: Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

Postby m0rl0ck » Mon Sep 24, 2012 4:04 am

Very helpful, thanks all.
"When you meditate, don't send your mind outside. Don't fasten onto any knowledge at all. Whatever knowledge you've gained from books or teachers, don't bring it in to complicate things. Cut away all preoccupations, and then as you meditate let all your knowledge come from what's going on in the mind. When the mind is quiet, you'll know it for yourself. But you have to keep meditating a lot. When the time comes for things to develop, they'll develop on their own. Whatever you know, have it come from your own mind.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai ... eleft.html
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Re: Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

Postby dhammapal » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:34 am

Thanissaro Bhikkhu wrote:So for (the Buddha), the purpose of the meditation is not to celebrate oneness or to celebrate acceptance. It's to develop two very different kinds of emotions: disenchantment and dispassion. The Pali word for disenchantment, nibbida, also means distaste, disgust, or revulsion, which may sound strong, but it needs to be strong. It's an antidote to our strong attachment to feeding on (sensual pleasures). That attachment, the Buddha said, is the essence of suffering. The word upadana, which means clinging, also means the act of eating, of taking sustenance. He says that upadana lies at the essence of suffering and stress. So what we need to learn is how to look at the things we feed on until we develop a strong sense that we don't want to feed on them any more.
From: Disenchantment by Thanissaro Bhikkhu

With metta / dhammapal.
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Re: Question about the term "revulsion" in this sutta quote

Postby Dmytro » Mon Sep 24, 2012 3:09 pm

LonesomeYogurt wrote:The Pali term is "nibbidaa" and it is often rendered as "disenchantment" or "disillusion" as well as the more dramatic "revulsion."


It literally means "disgust": viewtopic.php?f=23&t=5562
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