YOU CANNOT POST. OUR WEB HOSTING COMPANY DECIDED TO MOVE THE SERVER TO ANOTHER LOCATION. IN THE MEANTIME, YOU CAN VIEW THIS VERSION WHICH DOES NOT ALLOW POSTING AND WILL NOT SAVE ANYTHING YOU DO ONCE THE OTHER SERVER GOES ONLINE.

AN 6.55: Sona Sutta - Dhamma Wheel

AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Each week we study and discuss a different sutta or Dhamma text

Moderator: mikenz66

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 7:49 am

AN 6.55 PTS: A iii 374 Sona Sutta: About Sona

In this famous sutta the Buddha explains to Ven. Sona that balancing one's effort in meditation practice is like tuning a musical instrument.
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html

I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Rajagaha, on Vulture Peak Mountain. And on that occasion Ven. Sona was staying near Rajagaha in the Cool Wood. Then, as Ven. Sona was meditating in seclusion [after doing walking meditation until the skin of his soles was split & bleeding], this train of thought arose in his awareness: "Of the Blessed One's disciples who have aroused their persistence, I am one, but my mind is not released from the fermentations through lack of clinging/sustenance. Now, my family has enough wealth that it would be possible to enjoy wealth & make merit. What if I were to disavow the training, return to the lower life, enjoy wealth, & make merit?"

Then the Blessed One, as soon as he perceived with his awareness the train of thought in Ven. Sona's awareness — as a strong man might stretch out his bent arm or bend his outstretched arm — disappeared from Vulture Peak Mountain, appeared in the Cool Wood right in front of Ven. Sona, and sat down on a prepared seat. Ven. Sona, after bowing down to the Blessed One, sat to one side. As he was sitting there, the Blessed One said to him, "Just now, as you were meditating in seclusion, didn't this train of thought appear to your awareness: 'Of the Blessed One's disciples who have aroused their persistence, I am one, but my mind is not released from the fermentations... What if I were to disavow the training, return to the lower life, enjoy wealth, & make merit?'"

"Yes, lord."

"Now what do you think, Sona. Before, when you were a house-dweller, were you skilled at playing the vina?"

"Yes, lord."

"And what do you think: when the strings of your vina were too taut, was your vina in tune & playable?"

"No, lord."

"And what do you think: when the strings of your vina were too loose, was your vina in tune & playable?"

"No, lord."

"And what do you think: when the strings of your vina were neither too taut nor too loose, but tuned[1] to be right on pitch, was your vina in tune & playable?"

"Yes, lord."

"In the same way, Sona, over-aroused persistence leads to restlessness, overly slack persistence leads to laziness. Thus you should determine the right pitch for your persistence, attune[2]the pitch of the [five] faculties [to that], and there pick up your theme."

"Yes, lord," Ven. Sona answered the Blessed One. Then, having given this exhortation to Ven. Sona, the Blessed One — as a strong man might stretch out his bent arm or bend his outstretched arm — disappeared from the Cool Wood and appeared on Vulture Peak Mountain.

So after that, Ven. Sona determined the right pitch for his persistence, attuned the pitch of the [five] faculties [to that], and there picked up his theme. Dwelling alone, secluded, heedful, ardent, & resolute, he in no long time reached & remained in the supreme goal of the holy life for which clansmen rightly go forth from home into homelessness, knowing & realizing it for himself in the here & now. He knew: "Birth is ended, the holy life fulfilled, the task done. There is nothing further for the sake of this world." And thus Ven. Sona became another one of the arahants.

Then, on the attainment of arahantship, this thought occurred to Ven. Sona: "What if I were to go to the Blessed One and, on arrival, to declare gnosis in his presence?" So he then went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: "When a monk is an arahant, his fermentations ended, who has reached fulfillment, done the task, laid down the burden, attained the true goal, totally destroyed the fetter of becoming, and is released through right gnosis, he is dedicated to six things: renunciation, seclusion, non-afflictiveness, the ending of craving, the ending of clinging/sustenance, & non-deludedness.

"Now it may occur to a certain venerable one to think, 'Perhaps it is entirely dependent on conviction that this venerable one is dedicated to renunciation,' but it should not be seen in that way. The monk whose fermentations are ended, having fulfilled [the holy life], does not see in himself anything further to do, or anything further to add to what he has done. It is because of the ending of passion, because of his being free of passion, that he is dedicated to renunciation. It is because of the ending of aversion, because of his being free of aversion, that he is dedicated to renunciation. It is because of the ending of delusion, because of his being free of delusion, that he is dedicated to renunciation.

"Now it may occur to a certain venerable one to think, 'Perhaps it is because he desires gain, honor, & fame that this venerable one is dedicated to seclusion' ... 'Perhaps it is because he falls back on attachment to precepts & practices as being essential that he is dedicated to non-afflictiveness,' but it should not be seen in that way. The monk whose fermentations are ended, having fulfilled [the holy life], does not see in himself anything further to do, or anything further to add to what he has done. It is because of the ending of passion, because of his being free of passion, that he is dedicated to non-afflictiveness. It is because of the ending of aversion, because of his being free of aversion, that he is dedicated to non-afflictiveness. It is because of the ending of delusion, because of his being free of delusion, that he is dedicated to non-afflictiveness.

"It is because of the ending of passion, because of his being free of passion... because of the ending of aversion, because of his being free of aversion... because of the ending of delusion, because of his being free of delusion, that he is dedicated to the ending of craving... the ending of clinging/sustenance... non-deludedness.

"Even if powerful forms cognizable by the eye come into the visual range of a monk whose mind is thus rightly released, his mind is neither overpowered nor even engaged. Being still, having reached imperturbability, he focuses on their passing away. And even if powerful sounds... aromas... flavors... tactile sensations... Even if powerful ideas cognizable by the intellect come into the mental range of a monk whose mind is thus rightly released, his mind is neither overpowered nor even engaged. Being still, having reached imperturbability, he focuses on their passing away.

"Just as if there were a mountain of rock — without cracks, without fissures, one solid mass — and then from the east there were to come a powerful storm of wind & rain: the mountain would neither shiver nor quiver nor shake. And then from the west... the north... the south there were to come a powerful storm of wind & rain: the mountain would neither shiver nor quiver nor shake. In the same way, even if powerful forms cognizable by the eye come into the visual range of a monk whose mind is thus rightly released, his mind is neither overpowered nor even engaged. Being still, having reached imperturbability, he focuses on their passing away. And even if powerful sounds... aromas... flavors... tactile sensations... Even if powerful ideas cognizable by the intellect come into the mental range of a monk whose mind is thus rightly released, his mind is neither overpowered nor even engaged. Being still, having reached imperturbability, he focuses on their passing away."


When one's awareness is dedicated
to renunciation, seclusion,
non-afflictiveness, the ending of clinging,
the ending of craving, & non-deludedness,
seeing the arising of the sense media,
the mind is rightly released.
For that monk, rightly released,
his heart at peace,
there's nothing to be done,
nothing to add
to what's done.
As a single mass of rock isn't moved by the wind,
even so all forms, flavors, sounds,
aromas, contacts,
ideas desirable & not,
have no effect on one who is Such.
The mind
— still, totally released —
focuses on
their passing away.

Notes

1. Lit. "established."

2. "Penetrate," "ferret out."

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 8:01 am


User avatar
Sam Vara
Posts: 2127
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:42 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby Sam Vara » Wed Oct 10, 2012 10:32 am


User avatar
daverupa
Posts: 5980
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:58 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby daverupa » Wed Oct 10, 2012 11:06 am

In keeping with the music analogy, the faculties are each employed with a certain pitch, and the point is to harmonize them in order to get a boost in resonance.

The tuning fork is right view around which runs the whole of the Path; direct discernment of wholesome and unwholesome, or continual reflection before/during/after on whether the action afflicted/s anyone or not. The faculties are harmonized in just such a way, and it is all meant to facilitate jhana, it seems to me.

Skilled vina players are not made in a day.

User avatar
Sam Vara
Posts: 2127
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:42 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby Sam Vara » Wed Oct 10, 2012 4:06 pm


User avatar
daverupa
Posts: 5980
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:58 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby daverupa » Wed Oct 10, 2012 4:35 pm


User avatar
Sam Vara
Posts: 2127
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:42 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby Sam Vara » Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:38 pm


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:42 pm


User avatar
daverupa
Posts: 5980
Joined: Mon Jan 31, 2011 6:58 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby daverupa » Wed Oct 10, 2012 6:47 pm


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 2:04 am

Here's some background about Sona:
http://www.aimwell.org/DPPN/sona.htm

Soṇa-Koḷivisa Thera.- Also called Sukhumāla Soṇa (AA.ii.679). He was born in Campā, his father being Usabhaseṭṭhi. From the time of his conception his father’s wealth continued to increase, and, on the day of his birth, the whole town kept festival. Because in a previous birth he had given a ring, worth one hundred thousand, to a Pacceka Buddha, his body was like burnished gold — hence his name. (He was evidently called Koḷivisa because he was a Koḷiyan, Ap.i.95, 21). His hands and feet were soft like bandhujīvaka-flowers, and a fine down grew on them (four inches long on his feet, Ap.i.298) curved “like ear ornaments.” He lived in great luxury in three palaces, each having its own season.

King Bimbisāra, hearing of him, sent for him and Soṇa went with eighty thousand fellow townsmen.

In Rājagaha he heard the Buddha teach, and, winning faith, entered the Order with his parents' consent. The Buddha gave him a subject for meditation, and he went to Sītavana, but many people visited him and he was unable to concentrate. He strove hard, and, through pacing up and down in meditation, painful sores developed on his feet. However, he won no attainment and was filled with despair. The Buddha saw this and visited him, and by teaching him the Vīnūpamovāda Sutta (see Soṇa Sutta), taught him how to temper energy with calm. Thus corrected, he put forth fresh effort and attained Arahantship (Thag.vss.632).

The Vinaya (i.179ff) gives details of Soṇa’s visit to Bimbisāra. The king, being curious to see Soṇa’s feet, sent for him. He and his eighty-thousand companions went to see the Buddha, and there they were greatly impressed by the psychic powers of Sāgata. Soṇa then sought the Buddha alone and joined the Order. After ordination he walked about meditating, his feet bled, and his walking path (caṅkamana) was covered with blood “like a slaughter-house for oxen.” After Soṇa attained Arahantship, the Buddha gave him permission to wear shoes with one lining. Soṇa said he had abandoned eighty cartloads of gold and a retinue of seven elephants. He did not wish, as a monk, to have any luxuries which his colleagues did not share, The Buddha then gave permission to all monks to wear shoes with one lining.

In the time of Anomadassī Buddha he was a multi-millionaire, and, having gone with others to the vihāra and heard the Buddha teach, he decorated a walking path (caṅkamana) for the Buddha and a long hall (dīghasālā) for the monks. On the walking path he scattered various flowers, and, above it, he hung canopies. In the time of Padumuttara Buddha he was a millionaire of Haṃsavatī named Sirivaḍḍha. It was then that he resolved to win eminence as foremost of those who strove energetically (aggaṃ āraddhaviriyānaṃ), and in this he was successful (A.i.24). After the death of Kassapa Buddha, Soṇa was a householder in Benares, and built a hut by the river for a Pacceka Buddha, whom he looked after during the rainy season. He was king of the gods for twenty-five world-cycles, and seventy-seven times king among men under the name of Yasodhara. ThagA.i.544f.; cf. Ap.i.93f., where he is called Koḷiyavessa. The ApA. confused his story with that of Kuṭikaṇṇa; see also AA.i.130f., where the details are different, especially regarding the honour paid by Soṇa to the Pacceka Buddha. Once, on visiting the Pacceka Buddha’s cell, he noticed that the ground outside it was muddy; so he spread on the ground a rug worth one hundred thousand, so that the Pacceka Buddha’s feet might not be soiled.

The Apadāna mentions (Ap.i.298) a Thera, called Soṇa Koṭivīsa, evidently identical with the above, the reason given for the name being that he gave away wealth equal in value to twenty crores (vīsa koṭi). His eminence is ascribed to the fact that, in the time of Vipassī Buddha, he made a cave (lena) for the Buddha and his monks and spread it with rugs.

Buddhaghosa (AA.i.130) gives a variant of his name, calling him Koṭivessa, and explains this by saying that he belonged to a merchant (vessa) family worth a crore.

The Soṇa Sutta (Cf. AA.ii.680, where he is described as gandhabbasippe cheko) mentions that Soṇa was a clever player of the lute (vīnā) before he joined the Order. It was the example of Soṇa Kolivisa that urged Nandaka and his brother, Bharata, to leave the world. ThagA.i.299.

Soṇa Sutta.- Soṇa Koḷivisa, living in Sītavana, despairs of ever attaining Arahantship. The Buddha, on Gijjhakūṭa, becomes aware of this and visits him. The Buddha reminds him that when he was a lute player his lute sounded neither tuneful nor playable when the strings were either over-strung or over-lax. Even so, energy, when over-strung, ends in flurry, when over-lax, in idleness. Soṇa profits by the lesson and becomes an Arahant. He then visits the Buddha and declares to him his new found vision. A.iii.374f.

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 8:00 am


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 8:06 am

Bhikkhu Bodhi's translation of the verses in AN 6.55

If one is intent on renunciation
and solitude of mind;
if one is intent on non-affliction
and the destruction of clinging';
if one is intent on craving's destruction
and non-confusion of mind:
when one sees the sense bases' arising,
ones's mind is completely liberated.

For a bhikkhu of peaceful mind,
one completely liberated,
there's nothing further to be done,
no [need to] increase what has been done.

As a stone mountain, one solid mass,
is not stirred by the wind,
so no forms and tastes, sounds,
odors, and tactile objects,
and phenomena desirable or undesirable
stir the stable one's mind.
His mind is steady and freed,
and he observes it's vanishing.

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 8:13 am

PTS Gradual Sayings Translation.

Dispassion, mind's detachment, harmlessness,
Grasping's and craving's end, mind undeluded:
Who hath applied himself to these, hath seen
Sensations' rise --- his mind is wholly freed;

And in that monk, calmed, wholly freed, naught need
Be added to what's done, naught due is found.
As massive crag by wind is never moved,
So sights, tastes, sounds, smells, touches, yea, the things
Longed for and loathed stir not a man like that;
His mind stands firm, released; he marks their set.'

User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Oct 13, 2012 8:38 pm


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:34 am


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 14, 2012 8:58 am


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 14, 2012 9:18 am


Mal
Posts: 75
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 12:21 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby Mal » Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:07 pm


Mal
Posts: 75
Joined: Sat Sep 29, 2012 12:21 pm

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby Mal » Sun Oct 14, 2012 1:25 pm


User avatar
mikenz66
Posts: 14947
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: AN 6.55: Sona Sutta

Postby mikenz66 » Sun Oct 14, 2012 6:15 pm



Return to “Study Group”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 3 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine