Theravada and Buddha nature

A forum for beginners and members of other Buddhist traditions to ask questions about Theravāda (The Way of the Elders). Responses require moderator approval before they are visible.
Arjan Dirkse
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Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Arjan Dirkse » Thu Nov 01, 2012 4:35 pm

Hello,

I am interested in exploring Theravada...

I was wondering about a few things, is Nagarjuna and the Mulamadhyakakarika (one of my favorite books) considered part of Theravada? Or is that only Mahayana? Are there things in there that Theravada disagree with? And also "Buddha nature", do Theravadins believe that everybody has Buddha nature?

I would appreciate any reading tips...so far the only Theravada book I have read is "In the Buddha's Words" by Bhikkhu Bodhi, and I really liked it.

Thanks.

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LonesomeYogurt
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Thu Nov 01, 2012 5:03 pm

Nāgārjuna is definitely a Mahayana figure, but most of what he had to say is still very relevant to Theravada practice.

As for Buddha-nature, you might be interested in In short though, there is no concept of Buddha Nature in Theravada.
Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


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m0rl0ck
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby m0rl0ck » Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:39 pm

“The truth knocks on the door and you say, "Go away, I'm looking for the truth," and so it goes away. Puzzling.” ― Robert M. Pirsig

befriend
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby befriend » Thu Nov 01, 2012 6:48 pm

not true, ajahn chah says in Chapter 1 in food for the heart "about this mind in truth there is nothing really wrong with it. it is intrinsically pure. Within itself it is already peaceful. if the mind is not peaceful these days its because it follows moods."
nothing can destroy a man who has lived a pure life

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cooran
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Location: Queensland, Australia

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby cooran » Thu Nov 01, 2012 8:09 pm

Hello all,

A couple of previous threads on Buddha nature:

What is wrong with Buddha Nature?
viewtopic.php?f=16&t=7716
Buddha nature
viewtopic.php?f=14&t=11429

with metta
Chris
---The trouble is that you think you have time---
---Worry is the Interest, paid in advance, on a debt you may never owe---
---It's not what happens to you in life that is important ~ it's what you do with it ---

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retrofuturist
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby retrofuturist » Thu Nov 01, 2012 10:16 pm

"Do not force others, including children, by any means whatsoever, to adopt your views, whether by authority, threat, money, propaganda, or even education." - Ven. Thich Nhat Hanh

"The uprooting of identity is seen by the noble ones as pleasurable; but this contradicts what the whole world sees." (Snp 3.12)

"To argue with a person who has renounced the use of reason is like administering medicine to the dead" - Thomas Paine

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LonesomeYogurt
Posts: 900
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Location: America

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Thu Nov 01, 2012 11:35 pm

Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


dhammapal
Posts: 1562
Joined: Sun Nov 01, 2009 9:23 am
Location: Sydney, Australia

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby dhammapal » Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:11 am

Hi,

Hanzze posted Maha Ghosananda's on the Mahayana forum. It is very interfaith. I think that Cambodia is Theravada.

Thanissaro Bhikkhu points out that the expert on Buddha Nature would have been the historical Buddha and he didn't mention it in the Pali Canon.

With metta / dhammapal.






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Dan74
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Dan74 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 5:44 am

_/|\_

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LonesomeYogurt
Posts: 900
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:24 pm
Location: America

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Fri Nov 02, 2012 6:07 am

Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


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Kusala
Posts: 667
Joined: Sun Jan 23, 2011 11:02 am

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Kusala » Fri Nov 02, 2012 8:03 am

Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

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daverupa
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby daverupa » Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:09 pm


Arjan Dirkse
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 2:58 pm

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Arjan Dirkse » Fri Nov 02, 2012 12:26 pm

Thanks for all the answers.

santa100
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby santa100 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 1:36 pm


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Dan74
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Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Dan74 » Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:11 pm

_/|\_

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Bonsai Doug
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Location: Finger Lakes area of NY

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Bonsai Doug » Fri Nov 02, 2012 2:23 pm

Now having obtained a precious human body,
I do not have the luxury of remaining on a distracted path.

~ Tibetan Book of the Dead

Arjan Dirkse
Posts: 14
Joined: Thu Nov 01, 2012 2:58 pm

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Arjan Dirkse » Fri Nov 02, 2012 4:54 pm


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LonesomeYogurt
Posts: 900
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2012 4:24 pm
Location: America

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Fri Nov 02, 2012 5:14 pm

Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


User avatar
Bonsai Doug
Posts: 72
Joined: Sat Oct 23, 2010 4:59 pm
Location: Finger Lakes area of NY

Re: Theravada and Buddha nature

Postby Bonsai Doug » Fri Nov 02, 2012 5:28 pm

Now having obtained a precious human body,
I do not have the luxury of remaining on a distracted path.

~ Tibetan Book of the Dead


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