Itivittuka 111: Perfect in virtue

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Itivittuka 111: Perfect in virtue

Postby mikenz66 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 6:20 am

Itivittuka 111 {Iti 4.12; Iti 118}: Perfect in virtue {Iti 4.12; Iti 118}
ranslated from the Pali by Thanissaro Bhikkhu


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... ml#iti-111

This was said by the Blessed One, said by the Arahant, so I have heard: "Be consummate in virtue, monks, and consummate in the Patimokkha. Dwell restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in your behavior & sphere of activity. Train yourselves, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults.

"When one is consummate in virtue, consummate in the Patimokkha; dwelling restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in one's behavior & sphere of activity; training oneself, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults — what more is to be done?

"If, while he is walking, any greed in a monk is done away with, any ill will, any sloth & drowsiness, any restlessness & anxiety, any uncertainty is done away with; if his persistence is aroused and not lax; if his mindfulness is established & unmuddled; if his body is calm & unaroused; if his mind is centered & unified: then a monk walking with such ardency & concern is called continually & continuously resolute, one with persistence aroused.

"If, while he is standing...

"If, while he is sitting...

"If, while he is lying down, any greed in a monk is done away with, any ill will, any sloth & drowsiness, any restlessness & anxiety, any uncertainty is done away with; if his persistence is aroused and not lax; if his mindfulness is established & unmuddled; if his body is calm & unaroused; if his mind is centered & unified: then a monk lying down with such ardency & concern is called continually & continuously resolute, one with persistence aroused."

Controlled in walking,
controlled in standing,
controlled in sitting,
controlled in lying down,
controlled in flexing & extending his limbs
    — above, around, & below,
    as far as the worlds extend —
    observing the arising & passing away
    of phenomena,
    of aggregates:
a monk who dwells thus ardently,
not restlessly, at peace —
always mindful,
training in the mastery
of awareness-tranquillity —
is said to be continually resolute.
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Re: Itivittuka 111: Perfect in virtue

Postby polarbuddha101 » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:36 pm

It's amazing how hard it is just to do this for an hour or two. I can see why the Buddha said that if someone really practiced satipatthana like this for even a week, they could achieve Awakening.

edit: this discipline is certainly worth aspiring towards/doing.

:anjali:
"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."
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Re: Itivittuka 111: Perfect in virtue

Postby DAWN » Mon Nov 05, 2012 8:58 pm

It's must be done.

Amazing.
Sabbe dhamma anatta
We are not concurents...
I'am sorry for my english
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Re: Itivittuka 111: Perfect in virtue

Postby Cittasanto » Mon Nov 05, 2012 10:14 pm

Hi,
"Be consummate in virtue, monks, and consummate in the Patimokkha. Dwell restrained in accordance with the Patimokkha, consummate in your behavior & sphere of activity. Train yourselves, having undertaken the training rules, seeing danger in the slightest faults."

This verse is interestingly wide ranging in what context it is applied, from everything from the wings to awakening, to being liked by companions. it may seam quite a simple verse but its importance is potentially underrated and overlooked.

of course the virtue could be that of any amount of precept, but it is interesting that the slightest wrong is emphasised; or what could be considered minor customs and rules are important for both harmony, and progress through the assistance of admirable friends.
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
With Metta
Upāsaka Cittasanto
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."
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Re: Itivittuka 111: Perfect in virtue

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Nov 06, 2012 6:34 am

Here are some other suttas about abandoning the hindrances:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/index-su ... l#nivarana

Feeding and starving the hindrances:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
Antidote: direct the mind towards an inspiring object:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .olen.html
How to abandon the hindrances:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
Abandoning the hindrances is a quality that distinguishes the true contemplative:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... akefulness
Giving to one who has abandoned the hindrances brings good results
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... html#lost5
Like canals dissipating the force of a river current:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka ... .than.html
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