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Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife? - Page 6 - Dhamma Wheel

Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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ancientbuddhism
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby ancientbuddhism » Wed Oct 24, 2012 7:38 am

I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.” – Henry David Thoreau, Walden, 1854

Secure your own mask before assisting others. – NORTHWEST AIRLINES (Pre-Flight Instruction)


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Kim OHara
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Kim OHara » Wed Oct 24, 2012 10:45 am


Mawkish1983
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Mawkish1983 » Wed Oct 24, 2012 4:26 pm


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LonesomeYogurt
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby LonesomeYogurt » Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:02 pm

Gain and loss, status and disgrace,
censure and praise, pleasure and pain:
these conditions among human beings are inconstant,
impermanent, subject to change.

Knowing this, the wise person, mindful,
ponders these changing conditions.
Desirable things don’t charm the mind,
undesirable ones bring no resistance.

His welcoming and rebelling are scattered,
gone to their end,
do not exist.
- Lokavipatti Sutta


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ancientbuddhism
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby ancientbuddhism » Wed Oct 24, 2012 5:41 pm

I say, beware of all enterprises that require new clothes, and not rather a new wearer of clothes.” – Henry David Thoreau, Walden, 1854

Secure your own mask before assisting others. – NORTHWEST AIRLINES (Pre-Flight Instruction)


Mawkish1983
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Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 9:46 am
Location: Essex, UK

Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Mawkish1983 » Wed Oct 24, 2012 6:14 pm


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Kusala
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Kusala » Tue Oct 30, 2012 2:00 am

Food for thought...



Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

Arjan Dirkse
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Arjan Dirkse » Thu Nov 01, 2012 3:02 pm

Well I did quickly notice this quote in the original article: "Although I considered myself a faithful Christian"...

So yeah, I remain skeptical. ;)

That said, he seems very happy to find an affirmation for his beliefs. So good for him.

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gavesako
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby gavesako » Tue Nov 13, 2012 7:49 am

A relevant article on this topic from Tricycle:


A Gray Matter: Another Look at the Convergence of Buddhism and Science

If you haven’t heard that Buddhist mindfulness meditation can change your brain for the better, you haven’t opened a magazine or newspaper lately. On the other hand, if you haven’t heard that research supporting such a claim is at best inconclusive, you can’t be blamed—it’s not a view you’re likely to come across as readily.

The ongoing story of the convergence of Buddhist practice and science—lately and most notably, neuroscience—has garnered a lot of press, and the popular narrative has been overwhelmingly weighted in favor of those who argue that Buddhism’s rationalist bent makes it, of all religions, uniquely compatible with scientific truths. But as is evident in this issue of Tricycle, a strong counternarrative has begun to emerge. In “A Gray Matter,” Columbia professor of Japanese religion Bernard Faure writes that a “careful and critical reading of the literature on Buddhism and neuroscience will lead, I think, to a far more sober assessment of their convergence than one generally hears from its advocates.”

Aside from questioning the science itself, Faure challenges the highly selective reading of Buddhism upon which the supposed convergence is based: The convergence of Buddhism and science is, Faure argues, largely a consequence of modern Buddhists—in both Asia and the West—having radically redefined the tradition for that specific purpose.

This notion of convergence has been around since the 19th century. In this issue’s “The Scientific Buddha,” adapted from his new book of the same name, University of Michigan professor Donald S. Lopez, Jr., a Tricycle contributing editor, focuses on the history of the dialogue between Buddhism and science and how it came to assume its present form. Lopez observes:

For the Buddha to be identified as an ancient sage fully attuned to the findings of modern science, it was necessary that he first be transformed into a figure who differed in many ways from the Buddha who has been revered by Buddhists across Asia over the course of many centuries. . . . [19th-century] European scholars, many of whom never met a Buddhist or set foot in Asia, created a new Buddha, a Buddha made from manuscripts. This was the age of the quest for the historical Jesus. European philologists set out on their own quest for the historical Buddha, and they felt they found him. It was this Buddha, unknown in Asia until the 19th century, who would become the Buddha we know today, and who would become the Scientific Buddha.

While both Faure and Lopez take a critical view of the exchange between Buddhism and science, their criticism is predicated on the belief that this dialogue is nonetheless necessary and—if some of the deep misconceptions that have shaped it are cleared up— potentially fruitful. But as these two scholars demonstrate, our erroneous views run deep. Perhaps the most significant difficulty is not so much a specific idea as it is the model that guides us. The Buddhism and science dialogue has been shaped by a model of comparison that sees the finding of agreement—convergence—as the most beneficial and desirable avenue to pursue. But as Faure writes, a comparative model based on mutual challenge might well shed more light on both Buddhism and science:

“Convergence may never be reached, and that is likely for the best, because it is difference, and the challenges it presents, that is the richer source of understanding.”

http://www.tricycle.com/blog/gray-matte ... nd-science
Bhikkhu Gavesako
Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

- Theravada texts
- Translations and history of Pali texts
- Sutta translations

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Kusala
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Kusala » Tue Nov 13, 2012 8:47 am

Image

"He, the Blessed One, is indeed the Noble Lord, the Perfectly Enlightened One;
He is impeccable in conduct and understanding, the Serene One, the Knower of the Worlds;
He trains perfectly those who wish to be trained; he is Teacher of gods and men; he is Awake and Holy. "

--------------------------------------------
"The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One,
Apparent here and now, timeless, encouraging investigation,
Leading to liberation, to be experienced individually by the wise. "

User avatar
Kim OHara
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Joined: Wed Dec 09, 2009 5:47 am
Location: North Queensland, Australia

Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Kim OHara » Thu Nov 15, 2012 9:52 pm

Idle click-through curiousity (okay, I was (still am) putting off starting work :tongue: ) just led me to Amazon's list of 100 best-selling books.
Guess what I found? Right up there at number four, this very book.
Looking at the rest of the top twenty - - doesn't do much to increase my faith in the neurosurgeon or, for that matter, the intelligence and discernment of Amazon's customers ... :rolleye:

:namaste:
Kim

pegembara
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby pegembara » Fri Nov 16, 2012 4:41 am

And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech.

Moggalana
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Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby Moggalana » Sat Nov 17, 2012 7:52 am

Sam Harris wrote a second blog about NDEs:
http://www.samharris.org/blog/item/scie ... k-of-death
Let it come. Let it be. Let it go.

pegembara
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Joined: Tue Oct 13, 2009 8:39 am

Re: Neurosurgeon's visit to heaven - proof of afterlife?

Postby pegembara » Sat Nov 17, 2012 2:07 pm

First, the teachings: The lama in my dream began by asking who I was. I responded by telling him my name. Apparently, this wasn’t the answer he was looking for.
Who are you?” he said again. He was now staring fixedly into my eyes and pointing at my face with an outstretched finger. I did not know what to say.
“Who are you?” he said again, continuing to point.
“Who are you?” he said a final time, but here he suddenly shifted his gaze and pointing finger, as though he were now addressing someone just to my left. The effect was quite startling, because I knew (insofar as one can be said to know anything in a dream) that we were alone. The lama was obviously pointing to someone who wasn’t there, and I suddenly noticed what I would later come to consider an important truth about the nature of the mind: Subjectively speaking, there is only consciousness and its contents; there is no inner self who is conscious. The feeling of being the experiencer of your experience, rather than identical to the totality of experience, is an illusion. The lama in my dream seemed to dissect this very feeling of being a self and, for a brief moment, removed it from my mind. I awoke convinced that I had glimpsed something quite profound.

http://www.samharris.org/blog/item/scie ... k-of-death

:buddha2:
And what is right speech? Abstaining from lying, from divisive speech, from abusive speech, & from idle chatter: This is called right speech.


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