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SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk - Dhamma Wheel

SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

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SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:42 pm


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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Nov 27, 2012 7:49 pm

SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta, The She-falcon
Translated by Bhikkhu Nanananda

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... passage-25

"Once upon a time, monks, a she-falcon suddenly swooped down and seized a quail. Then, monks, the quail, while it was being carried away by the she-falcon, thus lamented: 'Just my bad luck and lack of merit! [It serves me right] for trespassing outside my own pasture into others' property. If I had kept my own ancestral beat today, this she-falcon would have been no match for me, if it came to a fight.'

"'But what is that pasture, quail, which is your own ancestral beat?'

"'It is a field turned up by the plowshare, a place all covered with clods.'

"Then, monks, the she-falcon, without being stiff in her assertion of strength, not caring to argue with the quail on her own strength,[75] released the quail saying, 'Off with you, quail, but even by going there you will not escape me.'

"So monks, the quail went off to a plowed field, to a place all covered with clods, perched on a great clod and stood challenging the she-falcon, thus: 'Now come on, you falcon! Now come on, you falcon!'

"Then, monks, the she-falcon, without being stiff in her assertion of strength, not caring to argue with the quail on her own strength, poising both her wings, swooped down upon the quail.

"But, monks, as soon as the quail knew that the she-falcon had come too close to her, she slipped inside that very clod. And then, monks, the falcon shattered her breast thereon.

"So it is, monks, with one who goes roaming out of his own pasture, in others' property. Wherefore, monks, roam ye not outside your own pasture, in others' property. To those who so roam, monks, Maara will get access. In them, Maara will find a support.

"And what, monks, is not one's own pasture, but others' property. It is the five kinds of sense-pleasure. What five?

"Forms cognizable by the eye, desirable, charming, pleasant, delightful, passion-fraught and alluring. Sounds cognizable by the ear... scents cognizable by the nose... savors cognizable by the tongue... tangibles cognizable by the body, desirable, charming, pleasant, delightful, passion-fraught and alluring. This, monks, is not one's own pasture but other's property, in the case of a monk.

"Monks, do ye range in your own pasture, keep to your ancestral beat. To those who range their own pasture, who keep to their ancestral beat, Maara will get no access. In them Maara will find no support.

"And what, monks, is a monk's own pasture? What is his ancestral beat? It is the Four Foundations of Mindfulness. What four?

"Herein, monks, a monk dwells, as regards body, contemplating body, ardent, fully aware and mindful, having overcome covetousness and grief concerning the world. He dwells, as regards feeling, contemplating feeling, ardent, fully aware... He dwells, as regards mind, contemplating mind... He dwells, as regards mind-objects, contemplating mind-objects, ardent, fully aware and mindful, having overcome covetousness and grief concerning the world. This, monks, is a monk's own pasture; this is his ancestral beat."[76]

NOTES

[75] The phrases 'sake bale apatthaddha,' 'sake bale asa.mvadamaanaa' have created some difficulty (see K.S. IV. 125. []) They occur twice and the meaning in both contexts should be the same, though K.S. gives 'relaxed her efforts, did not increase her grip' in the first instance and, 'putting forth her effort, not relaxing her effort,' in the second. The 'relaxation' meant by the word 'apatthaddha' ('not-rigid') is psychological rather than physical. It was born of excessive self-confidence, due to which the she-falcon, not being 'stiff' in her ways, first imposed on herself a handicap, and then swooped down unwarily on the quail. 'Asa.mvadamaana' is probably suggestive of her disdainful attitude towards the quail in not caring to give merely verbal rejoinders to its challenges in both instances.

[76] The Four Foundations of Mindfulness form the ground-plan for the development of the 'Knowledge and Vision of things as they are.' Within its range, awareness is focused directly on experience as such, reducing the tendency towards diffusion and proliferation in thought-currents. This insulation stems the tide of influxes which entices one into the 'others' territory' — the five-fold sense-pleasure.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby Sam Vara » Tue Nov 27, 2012 8:02 pm

Another favourite of mine. I find something very touching about the Quail getting a "second chance", so to speak, when she recalls and declares her proper range and territory. The story would make the same point had the Quail been killed and eaten despite her recollection, but would have lacked compassion. Everyone who practices and can understand this story has been given that second chance, haven't they?

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby gavesako » Tue Nov 27, 2012 9:03 pm

This is a good Sutta which shows that mindfulness practice is based on sense restraint and the 4 satipatthanas are a kind of framework to keep the mind in. This should be enough to correct the blurred understanding of "sati" in McMindfulness and Mindful Binge Drinking:

http://www.buddhistgeeks.com/2012/11/vi ... blobology/

:rolleye:
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Kiṃkusalagavesī anuttaraṃ santivarapadaṃ pariyesamāno... (MN 26)

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby mikenz66 » Thu Nov 29, 2012 12:23 am


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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby alan » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:08 am

I've never understood the motivation of the hawk, or what it is meant to symbolize.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:14 am


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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby alan » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:18 am

But why does Mara show compassion?

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby alan » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:22 am

Most of these parables end with an explanation of the terms, but we don't get that here.
The other weird thing, if you want to see the hawk as Mara, is that it dies so easily.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:34 am

It dies easily if one is in one's correct domain (which not so easy...).

:anjali:
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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby alan » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:40 am

But I don't see that in other suttas. Mara is usually represented as insidious, and not capable of compassion.
For instance, MN 45.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby alan » Fri Nov 30, 2012 1:57 am

Tried to edit that post to make it clear without asking everyone to go read MN 45, but it read better as is.
The overall point is that Mara is shown in the suttas as a creeping up, deceiving, not easily recognized, and surely never compassionate. I haven't found an example of Mara getting hold and then letting go.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 30, 2012 2:33 am


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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby alan » Fri Nov 30, 2012 2:46 am

The first described the Buddha's victory over Mara. The others are from a collection of verses about nuns, and their victory. But these stories describe rare states of awakening, and the difficulty that preceded it. They don't get to my question about the meaning of that sutta.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby polarbear101 » Fri Nov 30, 2012 4:54 am

The hawk isn't compassionate, it's arrogant. If I challenged someone I thought was much much weaker than me to a fight to the death and they challenged me back and said, "if I had a stick I could win" and I gave them the stick to prove the point that I am far superior that wouldn't be compassion, it would be arrogance.

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"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Nov 30, 2012 9:05 am


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Sam Vara
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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby Sam Vara » Fri Nov 30, 2012 11:19 am

Isn't seeing the hawk as a simile for Mara asking us to use a simile for a simile?

No real hawk, and no real Mara.

Either or both can remind us of what we have to do, though.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby daverupa » Fri Nov 30, 2012 5:51 pm


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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby alan » Sat Dec 01, 2012 2:38 am

Always thought of this sutta as something more along the lines of something that would be told to children. The moralism is obvious but it doesn't seem to fit in with others from SN.

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Re: SN 47.6: Sakunagghi Sutta — The Hawk

Postby santa100 » Sat Dec 01, 2012 6:57 pm



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