rat compassion

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rat compassion

Postby marc108 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 5:59 am

pretty awesome

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/ ... video.html
In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.

The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn’t the pa
yoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive— which is a lot to expect of a rat.

The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy— and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.
"It's easy for us to connect with what's wrong with us... and not so easy to feel into, or to allow us, to connect with what's right and what's good in us."
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Re: rat compassion

Postby Ben » Sat Dec 08, 2012 9:40 am

I wonder whether its a case of anthropomorphism.
Rats and mice, when they are hungry, won't hesitate to predate on each other.
kind regards,

Ben
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725


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Re: rat compassion

Postby polarbuddha101 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 11:42 am

Ben wrote:I wonder whether its a case of anthropomorphism.
Rats and mice, when they are hungry, won't hesitate to predate on each other.
kind regards,

Ben


Humans are also known to cannibalize each other, as well as kill for mere pleasure, I wonder if this is a case of de-animalization.

Edit: wolves are also known to kill merely for the sake of it at times (as in they only need to kill one sheep but will kill many more even though they do not intend to eat all of them).
"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."
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Re: rat compassion

Postby Ben » Sat Dec 08, 2012 12:33 pm

polarbuddha101 wrote:I wonder if this is a case of de-animalization.

I am merely the Devil's Advocate.
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725


Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
Buddhist Life Stories of Australia

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com
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Re: rat compassion

Postby polarbuddha101 » Sat Dec 08, 2012 12:42 pm

Ben wrote:
polarbuddha101 wrote:I wonder if this is a case of de-animalization.

I am merely the Devil's Advocate.


Point taken. I just felt that the combination of your response and mine would facilitate or encourage a certain amount of contemplation on the perceived (real or not) differences between humans and the rest of the animal kingdom. :yingyang:
"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."
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Re: rat compassion

Postby Ben » Sat Dec 08, 2012 12:46 pm

No worries, PB!
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725


Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
Buddhist Life Stories of Australia

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com
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Re: rat compassion

Postby SarathW » Mon Dec 10, 2012 3:12 am

I post a topic on this subject like to receive your input.

viewtopic.php?f=14&t=15139
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Re: rat compassion

Postby alan... » Tue Dec 25, 2012 4:14 am

marc108 wrote:pretty awesome

http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/ ... video.html
In a simple experiment, researchers at the University of Chicago sought to find out whether a rat would release a fellow rat from an unpleasantly restrictive cage if it could. The answer was yes.

The free rat, occasionally hearing distress calls from its compatriot, learned to open the cage and did so with greater efficiency over time. It would release the other animal even if there wasn’t the pa
yoff of a reunion with it. Astonishingly, if given access to a small hoard of chocolate chips, the free rat would usually save at least one treat for the captive— which is a lot to expect of a rat.

The researchers came to the unavoidable conclusion that what they were seeing was empathy— and apparently selfless behavior driven by that mental state.



this is fantastic!

i am often taken aback by how close we are to rats...

i had pet ones for a while, very smart actually! they can learn their names, be litter trained, do tricks, play fetch and are really sweet little animals. of course wild ones are likely to be another story but nonetheless.
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