A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change

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Ben
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A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change

Postby Ben » Wed Jul 01, 2009 3:33 am

A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change

In the run-up to the crucial U.N. Climate Treaty Conference in Copenhagen in December 2009, the Declaration that follows will present to the world's media a unique spiritual view of climate change and our urgent responsibility to address the solutions. It emerged from the contributions of over 20 Buddhist teachers of all traditions to the book A Buddhist Response to the Climate Emergency. The Time to Act is Now was composed as a pan-Buddhist statement by Zen teacher Dr David Tetsuun Loy and senior Theravadin teacher Ven. Bhikkhu Bodhi with scientific input from Dr John Stanley.


To read the declaration and add your name to it, please visit this page: http://www.ecobuddhism.org/buddhist-declaration.php
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
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e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com

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Guy
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Re: A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change

Postby Guy » Wed Jul 01, 2009 6:24 am

Hi Ben,

I have heard the claim that global warming is man made and I have heard the claim that global warming is a natural occurance that happens every so often due to solar movements and I have heard that the Earth has it's own patterns too which cause the planet to heat up and cool down every few thousand years. Which is the truth, how do we know? Maybe the scientists who claim that global warming is man-made are spreading propaganda or maybe these scientists are well meaning people who have misinterpreted the data? Maybe the scientists who claim man-made global warming is a myth are being paid by oil companies to try to keep them in business for longer?

I don't claim to know the truth, I am not a scientist, but how do we know what is REALLY going on? Are we being lied to, if so, by whom? There is probably a lot of political motives on both sides...maybe it is best to not get caught up in politics. Wasn't the Buddha tempted by Mara to become a "wheel turning monarch" before he became enlightened? What did the Buddha choose?

With Metta,

Guy
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

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Ben
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Re: A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change

Postby Ben » Wed Jul 01, 2009 11:22 am

Hi Guy
I think that's a very good question.
I suggest you evaluate the evidence that is available to you.
Personally, I trust that someone like Tim Flannery is telling the truth and, as a respected scientist, is making an accurate assessment of the data.

Quarterly Essay Issue 31
Now or Never: A sustainable future for Australia?

By Tim Flannery

This landmark essay by Tim Flannery is about sustainability, our search for it in the twenty-first century, and the impact it might have on the environmental threats that confront us today. Flannery discusses in detail three potential solutions to the most pressing of the sustainability challenges: climate change

ISBN 978-1-86395-271-2 - $15.95 - September 2008

http://www.quarterlyessay.com/qe/pastissues/index.php

Kind regards

Ben
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725

Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
Buddhist Life Stories of Australia
e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com

Mawkish1983
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Re: A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change

Postby Mawkish1983 » Wed Jul 01, 2009 11:54 am

I used to be a skeptic/sceptic [delete as appropriate] about the human influence on climate change. Now I'm not so sure, the evidence suggesting a human cause is mounting. Fast.

I suppose we could employ Pascal's Wager on this one. If we don't act and there is a human cause, we're doooooooomed. If we act and there is no human cause we at least help reduce our reliance on fossil fuels obtained from the less politically stable parts of the world. Seems win/win to me.

So, yeah, I'll sign whatever you stick under my nose about climate change now :)

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Guy
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Re: A Buddhist Declaration on Climate Change

Postby Guy » Wed Jul 01, 2009 1:52 pm

Thanks for the link Ben, I'll check it out now.

Good point Mawkish, I guess if you take the side of the environmentalists you can't really lose even if it is a myth.
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm


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