Buddha,Sabhuti (Diamond Sutta) and Pali Canon

An open and inclusive investigation into Buddhism and spiritual cultivation
terryshine
Posts: 11
Joined: Sat Jun 20, 2009 10:57 am

Buddha,Sabhuti (Diamond Sutta) and Pali Canon

Postby terryshine » Tue Jul 07, 2009 2:22 am

I have just read the diamond sutta, a discussion between the Buddha and Venerable Subhuti. The latter asking what should be the answer to people concerning being a Bodhisattva. I believe this is a Mahayana text discovered a 1000 years ago in a cave in China.
I would like to know
1. Is this Sutta in the Pali Canon?
2. This supposes that the notion of a Bodhisattva was extent pre Buddha which may be questionable as the Buddha was the first to enlightenment (in this era). Could this notion have appeared in the 40 years of the Buddhas teachings?
3. In the Sutta the Buddha does not disagree with the notion of a Bodhisattva but replies that there is no one to save. However there are other quotes from the Buddha that say there is no beginning and no ending to Samsara. So how could there be a notion that a Bodhisattva could exist as he would be waiting for ever plus one day?
I will be happy if someone has any knowledge of the above and will share it.

User avatar
retrofuturist
Posts: 15729
Joined: Tue Dec 30, 2008 9:52 pm
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Contact:

Re: Buddha,Sabhuti (Diamond Sutta) and Pali Canon

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jul 07, 2009 10:16 am

Greetings,

1. No.

2. The Buddha referred to pre-enlightened self as a "bodhisatta", but this is understood very differently in the suttas, to the Mahayana understanding of what this means

3. Just because there is no beginning or end to samsara does not mean it does not exist. However, "beings" do not exist to the extent that what we conventionally call a being is nothing more than a continual rising and cessation of the five aggregates.

Metta,
Retro. :)
"When we transcend one level of truth, the new level becomes what is true for us. The previous one is now false. What one experiences may not be what is experienced by the world in general, but that may well be truer. (Ven. Nanananda)

“I hope, Anuruddha, that you are all living in concord, with mutual appreciation, without disputing, blending like milk and water, viewing each other with kindly eyes.” (MN 31)

Never again...


Return to “Open Dhamma”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: SarathW and 6 guests

Google Saffron, Theravada Search Engine