Generosity vs Stinginess

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Generosity vs Stinginess

Postby Guy » Tue Jul 07, 2009 4:47 am

"Without abandoning these five qualities, one is incapable of entering & remaining in the first jhana... the second jhana... the third jhana... the fourth jhana; incapable of realizing the fruit of stream-entry... the fruit of once-returning... the fruit of non-returning... arahantship. Which five? Stinginess as to one's monastery [lodgings], stinginess as to one's family [of supporters], stinginess as to one's gains, stinginess as to one's status, and ingratitude. Without abandoning these five qualities, one is incapable of entering & remaining in the second jhana... the third jhana... the fourth jhana; one is incapable realizing the fruit of stream-entry... the fruit of once-returning... the fruit of non-returning... arahantship.

"With the abandoning of these five qualities, one is capable of entering & remaining in the second jhana... the third jhana... the fourth jhana; capable of realizing the fruit of stream-entry... the fruit of once-returning... the fruit of non-returning... arahantship..."

— AN 5.258-259

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I am interested to know what is meant by stinginess of the aforementioned "five qualities". "Ingratitude" is fairly straight forward. "Stinginess as to one's gains" I assume means that when you make money or acquire something of value you don't share it with others. The other three; "...one's monastery", "...one's family" and "...one's status" are not so clear to me.

Could someone please help clarify what these other three qualities of stinginess are? Also, what are the counter-measures of generosity to be developed to counter these three qualities of stinginess?

Thanks,

Guy
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm
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Re: Generosity vs Stinginess

Postby retrofuturist » Tue Jul 07, 2009 10:12 am

Greetings,

I think these ones are geared specifically towards the ordained.

Monestary / lodgings refers to the monestary, but more specifically to the living quarters, kuti etc. Stinginess would refer to trying to get the best lodgings for yourself and obsessing over it.

Family refers to any family who may provide regular and frequent donations. The stinginess possibly relating to trying to keep that relationship in tact, to the exclusion of others... so that the family will continue to support you well.

Status may refer to fame, may refer to number of rains retreats (vassa) completed, whether one is a preceptor to a more junior monk etc.

I'm happy to be corrected on any or all of the above, but they seem OK to me.

The countermeasures would include generosity and gratitude.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Generosity vs Stinginess

Postby Guy » Tue Jul 07, 2009 10:38 am

Thanks Retro, it makes more sense to me now. :smile:
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm
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Guy
 
Posts: 762
Joined: Fri May 22, 2009 4:05 am
Location: Perth, Western Australia


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