What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

A discussion on all aspects of Theravāda Buddhism

What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Individual » Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:30 am

I am curious. For those familiar with Buddhadasa, what has he written, if anything, about emptiness?

I am particularly interested if he critiques Mahayana and Theravada views. Does he uphold the Five Aggregates as "paramatha" and defend the notion of "svabhava," as traditional monastics do?
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra
Individual
 
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby jcsuperstar » Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:45 am

Heartwood of the Bodhi Tree is all about this

http://www.amazon.com/Heartwood-Bodhi-Tree-Teaching-Voidness/dp/0861710355/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247280256&sr=8-1

"In this remarkable book, Ajahn Buddhadasa teaches us beautifully, profoundly, and simply the meaning of sunnata, or voidness, which is a thread that links every great school of Buddhism....He teaches us the truth of this voidness with the same directness and simplicity with which he invites us into his forest." — from the foreword by Jack Kornfield
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat
User avatar
jcsuperstar
 
Posts: 1915
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 5:15 am
Location: alaska

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Individual » Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:47 am

The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra
Individual
 
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Jul 11, 2009 3:27 am

Yes, that's from the book. As it says in the introductory materail to the book, voidness was his particular "thing" and he was discouraged from teaching it to lay people. The book is certainly worth reading.

Mike
User avatar
mikenz66
 
Posts: 10124
Joined: Sat Jan 10, 2009 7:37 am
Location: New Zealand

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Jul 11, 2009 3:46 am

Individual wrote: Does he uphold the Five Aggregates as "paramatha" and defend the notion of "svabhava," as traditional monastics do?

Svabhava?
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19198
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Individual » Sat Jul 11, 2009 2:38 pm

tiltbillings wrote:
Individual wrote: Does he uphold the Five Aggregates as "paramatha" and defend the notion of "svabhava," as traditional monastics do?

Svabhava?

Sorry if I was confusing. It seems that svabhava is the Sanskrit spelling. The Pali term is "sabhava".

sabhava\svabhava: intrinsic-nature, own-being, etc..
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra
Individual
 
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby tiltbillings » Sat Jul 11, 2009 10:47 pm

Individual wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:
Individual wrote: Does he uphold the Five Aggregates as "paramatha" and defend the notion of "svabhava," as traditional monastics do?

Svabhava?

Sorry if I was confusing. It seems that svabhava is the Sanskrit spelling. The Pali term is "sabhava".

sabhava\svabhava: intrinsic-nature, own-being, etc..


I am well aware of that. Point is that you cannot correctly assume that that words is used the same way across schools.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19198
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Individual » Sun Jul 12, 2009 12:36 am

tiltbillings wrote:I am well aware of that. Point is that you cannot correctly assume that that words is used the same way across schools.

What makes you certain I merely assumed the usage was the same?
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra
Individual
 
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby tiltbillings » Sun Jul 12, 2009 12:39 am

Individual wrote:
tiltbillings wrote:I am well aware of that. Point is that you cannot correctly assume that that words is used the same way across schools.

What makes you certain I merely assumed the usage was the same?


You threw the word out there without qualification, and now here is your opportunity to clarify your very unclear statement.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19198
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Individual » Sun Jul 12, 2009 12:48 am

You can't fix a broken mirror by polishing it.
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra
Individual
 
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Individual » Sun Jul 12, 2009 12:57 am

From Buddhadasa's essay...

Firstly, consider the point that the Buddha declared that every word that he, the Tathagata, (one who is gone to Suchness), spoke referred to the subject of emptiness. He spoke of no other matter, either directly or indirectly. Any talk unconnected with the subject of emptiness is not the speech of the Tathagata but of disciples of a later time who liked to speak at great length to show how clever and articulate they were.


all things = dhamma
all things = emptiness
dhammas = emptiness


The word "mind" (citta) is being used here in a specific way. Don't confuse it with the 89 cittas or 121 cittas of the Abhidhamma. They are a different matter. That which we call original mind, the mind that is one with panna refers to the mind that is empty of grasping at and clinging to self. Actually, this state shouldn't be called mind at all, it should be called emptiness, but since it has the property of knowing we call it mind. The various schools call it by various names but strictly speaking it's enough to say that the true fundamental nature of mind is satipanna, truth-discerning awareness, absence of grasping and clinging. Thus emptiness lies in perfect panna.

Buddhadasa is very interesting!
The best things in life aren't things.

The Diamond Sutra
Individual
 
Posts: 1970
Joined: Mon Jan 12, 2009 2:19 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby tiltbillings » Sun Jul 12, 2009 12:59 am

Individual wrote:You can't fix a broken mirror by polishing it.


He said obliquely.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19198
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Present » Thu Jul 16, 2009 3:49 am

Individual wrote:From Buddhadasa's essay...

Firstly, consider the point that the Buddha declared that every word that he, the Tathagata, (one who is gone to Suchness), spoke referred to the subject of emptiness. He spoke of no other matter, either directly or indirectly. Any talk unconnected with the subject of emptiness is not the speech of the Tathagata but of disciples of a later time who liked to speak at great length to show how clever and articulate they were.


all things = dhamma
all things = emptiness
dhammas = emptiness


The word "mind" (citta) is being used here in a specific way. Don't confuse it with the 89 cittas or 121 cittas of the Abhidhamma. They are a different matter. That which we call original mind, the mind that is one with panna refers to the mind that is empty of grasping at and clinging to self. Actually, this state shouldn't be called mind at all, it should be called emptiness, but since it has the property of knowing we call it mind. The various schools call it by various names but strictly speaking it's enough to say that the true fundamental nature of mind is satipanna, truth-discerning awareness, absence of grasping and clinging. Thus emptiness lies in perfect panna.

Buddhadasa is very interesting!

Individual

I was so inspired by your post. This is the way to stream-entry (that is, if your mind did not already attain stream entry when writing your post).

:anjali:
Present
 

Re: What does Buddhadasa say about emptiness?

Postby Ngawang Drolma. » Thu Jul 16, 2009 5:46 am

I enjoyed excerpts from the essay too.

:anjali:
User avatar
Ngawang Drolma.
 
Posts: 805
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 7:38 pm


Return to General Theravāda discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 7 guests