poetry

Discussion of ordination, the Vinaya and monastic life. How and where to ordain? Bhikkhuni ordination etc.

poetry

Postby convivium » Sun Mar 17, 2013 4:09 am

it seems like the one artform left open to monks is poetry. it has a rich history in the visudhimagga, ajahn mun, and now i'm seeing ledi sayadaw (not to mention the mahayana).
Just keep breathing in and out like this. Don't be interested in anything else. It doesn't matter even if someone is standing on their head with their ass in the air. Don't pay it any attention. Just stay with the in-breath and the out-breath. Concentrate your awareness on the breath. Just keep doing it. http://www.ajahnchah.org/book/Just_Do_It_1_2.php
User avatar
convivium
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 7:13 am

Re: poetry

Postby SamKR » Sun Mar 17, 2013 6:35 am

convivium wrote:it seems like the one artform left open to monks is poetry. it has a rich history in the visudhimagga, ajahn mun, and now i'm seeing ledi sayadaw (not to mention the mahayana).

There are also other arts open to monks: the art of living, the art of following eight-fold path and meditation, the art of being liberated...
SamKR
 
Posts: 758
Joined: Sun Jul 19, 2009 4:33 pm
Location: Virginia

Re: poetry

Postby polarbuddha101 » Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:14 am

And the art of teaching the dhamma!
"I don't envision a single thing that, when developed & cultivated, leads to such great benefit as the mind. The mind, when developed & cultivated, leads to great benefit."

"I don't envision a single thing that, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about such suffering & stress as the mind. The mind, when undeveloped & uncultivated, brings about suffering & stress."
User avatar
polarbuddha101
 
Posts: 814
Joined: Mon Apr 16, 2012 7:39 am
Location: California

Re: poetry

Postby convivium » Sun Mar 17, 2013 7:04 pm

And the art of teaching the dhamma!
and the siddhis
Just keep breathing in and out like this. Don't be interested in anything else. It doesn't matter even if someone is standing on their head with their ass in the air. Don't pay it any attention. Just stay with the in-breath and the out-breath. Concentrate your awareness on the breath. Just keep doing it. http://www.ajahnchah.org/book/Just_Do_It_1_2.php
User avatar
convivium
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 7:13 am

Re: poetry

Postby Sam Vara » Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:39 pm

Ajahn Sucitto produced a beautiful set of paintings to accompany his book Dawn of the Dhamma

http://www.cittaviveka.org/files/books/dawn/index.htm
and at least one of the other monks at Cittaviveka draws and paints regularly.

Sucitto also writes poetry - examples are found in Tomorrow's Moon
http://books.google.co.uk/books/about/Tomorrow_s_Moon.html?id=4d7PMgEACAAJ&redir_esc=y
User avatar
Sam Vara
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:42 pm

Re: poetry

Postby danieLion » Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:42 pm

The Sutta Nipata is mostly poetry.
danieLion
 
Posts: 1947
Joined: Wed May 25, 2011 4:49 am

Re: poetry

Postby Coyote » Sun Mar 17, 2013 9:49 pm

Wow, I didn't know monks were able/allowed to paint. Is there any historical precedence for this or is it something fairly modern? Does anyone know what the Vinaya says?
"If beings knew, as I know, the results of giving & sharing, they would not eat without having given, nor would the stain of miserliness overcome their minds. Even if it were their last bite, their last mouthful, they would not eat without having shared."
Iti 26
Coyote
 
Posts: 537
Joined: Mon Sep 19, 2011 12:42 pm
Location: Wales - UK

Re: poetry

Postby danieLion » Mon Mar 18, 2013 7:27 am

Theragata X.2; Ekavihariya: Dwelling Alone (Thanissaro Tr.)

Translator's note: This poem, which is attributed to King Asoka's younger brother, falls into three parts: the first expresses his initial desire to leave the life of the palace and go into the forest; the second depicts his going forth; and the third announces his Awakening. Some scholars have suggested that many of the poems dealing with events in the lives of the early Buddhist monks and nuns may have originally been intended for dramatic performance, and this poem could easily have been written with that intent. The language of the original, with its heavy use of poetic terms, certainly indicates that the author had a literate background and was writing for a sophisticated audience.

If, in front or behind,
there is no one else,
it's extremely pleasant
for one staying alone
in the forest.

Come then! Alone
I will go to the wilderness
praised by the Awakened One
pleasant for a resolute monk
dwelling alone.

Alone,
astute in my goal,
I'll quickly enter the grove
— refreshing,
giving rapture to meditators —
the haunt
of elephants in rut.

When the Cool Forest's in full flower,
in a cool mountain gorge,
having bathed my limbs
I'll walk back & forth,
alone.

Ah, when will I dwell,
alone and free from companions,
in the refreshing great forest —
my task done,
fermentation-free?

As I desire to do this,
may my purpose succeed.
I myself
will bring it about.
No one can do it
for anyone else.

I myself
bind on my armor.
I will enter the grove
and will not emerge
without having attained
fermentations' end.

While soft breezes blow —
cool,
heavily,
fragrantly scented —
I'll make ignorance burst,
as I sit on a mountaintop.

In the forest covered with blossoms
or perhaps on a cool hillside,
blessed with the bliss of release,
on Giribbaja I'll delight. [1]

I am now he
whose resolves are fulfilled
like the moon on a full-moon night.
With all fermentations
totally ended,
here is now no further becoming.

Note 1. Giribbaja is the ring of mountains surrounding Vulture's Peak.
danieLion
 
Posts: 1947
Joined: Wed May 25, 2011 4:49 am

Re: poetry

Postby tiltbillings » Mon Mar 18, 2013 9:23 am

Sam Vara wrote:Ajahn Sucitto produced a beautiful set of paintings to accompany his book Dawn of the Dhamma

http://www.cittaviveka.org/files/books/dawn/index.htm
Quite lovely:

Image
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19194
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: poetry

Postby Sam Vara » Mon Mar 18, 2013 12:48 pm

Why, thank you, Tilt. I looked, but couldn't find anything on line as I didn't realise that the version on Cittaviveka's site had the pictures. I have a copy of the book, and in addition I have the benefit of Sucitto's presence at the local monastery.
User avatar
Sam Vara
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:42 pm

Re: poetry

Postby tiltbillings » Mon Mar 18, 2013 1:38 pm

Sam Vara wrote:Why, thank you, Tilt. I looked, but couldn't find anything on line as I didn't realise that the version on Cittaviveka's site had the pictures. I have a copy of the book, and in addition I have the benefit of Sucitto's presence at the local monastery.
Thank for posting the link. The book looks really good.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson
User avatar
tiltbillings
 
Posts: 19194
Joined: Wed Dec 31, 2008 9:25 am

Re: poetry

Postby convivium » Mon Mar 18, 2013 5:29 pm

Sam Vara wrote:
Ajahn Sucitto produced a beautiful set of paintings to accompany his book Dawn of the Dhamma

http://www.cittaviveka.org/files/books/dawn/index.htm

that's pretty amazing stuff for a thai forest monk to publish (it reminds me of songs of innocence and experience). sakyant tattoos can be pretty amazing i guess (but that's a dhammayut-exclusive thing i think). i was actually listening to his talks last night for the first time http://forestsanghapublications.org/downloadListen.php?id=4 then saw this posted in the morning. another thing is ajahn amaro publishes sorts of novels http://www.abhayagiri.org/books/the-pilgrim-kamanita or if you'd rather have it read to you http://archive.org/stream/ThePilgrimKamanitaABuddhistNovel/Pilgrim_Kamanita_web#page/n5/mode/2up
Just keep breathing in and out like this. Don't be interested in anything else. It doesn't matter even if someone is standing on their head with their ass in the air. Don't pay it any attention. Just stay with the in-breath and the out-breath. Concentrate your awareness on the breath. Just keep doing it. http://www.ajahnchah.org/book/Just_Do_It_1_2.php
User avatar
convivium
 
Posts: 574
Joined: Wed May 05, 2010 7:13 am

Re: poetry

Postby Sam Vara » Mon Mar 18, 2013 7:38 pm

convivium wrote:
Sam Vara wrote:
Ajahn Sucitto produced a beautiful set of paintings to accompany his book Dawn of the Dhamma

http://www.cittaviveka.org/files/books/dawn/index.htm

that's pretty amazing stuff for a thai forest monk to publish (it reminds me of songs of innocence and experience). sakyant tattoos can be pretty amazing i guess (but that's a dhammayut-exclusive thing i think). i was actually listening to his talks last night for the first time http://forestsanghapublications.org/downloadListen.php?id=4 then saw this posted in the morning. another thing is ajahn amaro publishes sorts of novels http://www.abhayagiri.org/books/the-pilgrim-kamanita or if you'd rather have it read to you http://archive.org/stream/ThePilgrimKamanitaABuddhistNovel/Pilgrim_Kamanita_web#page/n5/mode/2up


Yes, the naive nature of some of the representations, and the colours, remind me of Blake. But there is also a lot of Celtic-style knot-work which is lacking in Blake. This one
Image
is one of my favourites, as it is based on a window in the mediaeval church next to Cittaviveka. Apparently Sucitto used to go to the church to learn chanting.
User avatar
Sam Vara
 
Posts: 899
Joined: Sun Jun 05, 2011 5:42 pm


Return to Ordination and Monastic Life

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 5 guests