Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Theravāda in the 21st century - modern applications of ancient wisdom
Mawkish1983
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Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Mawkish1983 » Wed Jul 15, 2009 10:52 am

I just found this:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... el206.html

I don't know if it's been mentioned here before or not, but it seems very clear and very informative! It's a shame it's so long or I'd print it out. For now, I'm stuck reading it on a computer screen.

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Ben
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Ben » Wed Jul 15, 2009 11:51 am

Yes its very good!
Thanks Mawk for reminding us.
Metta

Ben
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725

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Guy
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Guy » Wed Jul 15, 2009 3:12 pm

Thanks Mawkish,

This is just what I need right now.

With Metta,

Guy
Four types of letting go:

1) Giving; expecting nothing back in return
2) Throwing things away
3) Contentment; wanting to be here, not wanting to be anywhere else
4) "Teflon Mind"; having a mind which doesn't accumulate things

- Ajahn Brahm

Mawkish1983
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Mawkish1983 » Thu Jul 16, 2009 3:36 pm

Right near the beginning there's a bit that says:

Nowhere in the Buddhist world are Buddha-images treated as ornaments for a living room.


My wife only allows me to have a Buddharupa as an ornament of sorts in the room, and I have to assemble my shrine each morning before I practice and disassemble it afterwards, putting the flowers, candles etc away. It really is a shame but I think I just have to wait a little while for my wife to relax a little further. Small steps :)

Incidentally, I put together a couple of pages of simple instructions for daily practice based on this "Lay Buddhist Practice" document, things like what to say when making offerings etc. Is anyone interested in me pdfing it and sticking it here, or should I just keep it for my own personal use (until I've memorised it)?

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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Cittasanto » Thu Jul 16, 2009 11:59 pm

Mawkish1983 wrote:Right near the beginning there's a bit that says:

Nowhere in the Buddhist world are Buddha-images treated as ornaments for a living room.


My wife only allows me to have a Buddharupa as an ornament of sorts in the room, and I have to assemble my shrine each morning before I practice and disassemble it afterwards, putting the flowers, candles etc away. It really is a shame but I think I just have to wait a little while for my wife to relax a little further. Small steps :)

Incidentally, I put together a couple of pages of simple instructions for daily practice based on this "Lay Buddhist Practice" document, things like what to say when making offerings etc. Is anyone interested in me pdfing it and sticking it here, or should I just keep it for my own personal use (until I've memorised it)?


I cant remember which one but think it may be the parinibbana sutta??? the buddha advises against having images of him, it was only wen bddhism went to greece that the rupas started to appear I believe. but we are in a different time, place and I find it useful to look at my small rupa at times

I would be interested in a copy!
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
Blog, - Some Suttas Translated, Ajahn Chah.
"Others will misconstrue reality due to their personal perspectives, doggedly holding onto and not easily discarding them; We shall not misconstrue reality due to our own personal perspectives, nor doggedly holding onto them, but will discard them easily. This effacement shall be done."

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Hoja
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Hoja » Fri Jul 17, 2009 2:23 am

Wow, it's a great resource.
Thanks Mawkish!

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jcsuperstar
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby jcsuperstar » Fri Jul 17, 2009 5:32 am

maybe you can go the japanese route and have an altar in a case that closes that way you just have to open it each time you want to meditate and the rest of the time its safely away out of sight
สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat

Mawkish1983
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Mawkish1983 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 6:31 am

jcsuperstar wrote:maybe you can go the japanese route and have an altar in a case that closes that way you just have to open it each time you want to meditate and the rest of the time its safely away out of sight

I've thought about fabricating just such an altar, but it doesn't solve the problem of having a Buddharupa on display in the living room as an ornament. I've placed it on a high shelf above everything else in the room, but it still serves as an ornament. I suppose I have to keep in mind that it's not just my home and in every marriage there is give-and-take. She let me have a Buddharupa in the house afterall, that's her concession. I suppose it wouldn't be too unskillful for me to make this concession: that when I'm not meditating the Buddharupa is an ornament.

I'll pdf the 'service sheet' today and upload them somewhere accessable.

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Macavity
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Macavity » Fri Jul 17, 2009 8:18 am

Mawkish1983 wrote:I've thought about fabricating just such an altar, but it doesn't solve the problem of having a Buddharupa on display in the living room as an ornament.


But if you kept the rupa inside a zushi as jcsuperstar suggested, then it wouldn't be on display at all, except when you opened the case.

zushi.jpg
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zushi2.jpg
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zushi3.jpg
zushi3.jpg (39.84 KiB) Viewed 1444 times

Mawkish1983
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby Mawkish1983 » Fri Jul 17, 2009 12:06 pm

Here's the pdf (attached) of that "daily order of service" I threw together. If anyone sees any mistakes or changes that need to be made please feel free to let me know and I'll sort it out.
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Daily Lay Practice.pdf
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sherubtse
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Re: Lay Buddhist Practice, a brilliant guide!

Postby sherubtse » Sun Jul 19, 2009 1:33 am

Mawkish1983 wrote:I just found this:

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... el206.html

I don't know if it's been mentioned here before or not, but it seems very clear and very informative! It's a shame it's so long or I'd print it out. For now, I'm stuck reading it on a computer screen.


This is of course a publication of the BPS. (See the note at the end of the article on the ATI website.)

They have many great articles, some of which are classics. As such, it is a pity that more folks don't know of their existence. Here is their website:

http://www.bps.lk/

Click on the "Online Library" link at thew top left-hand side of the homepage for more articles.

With metta,
Sherubtse


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