A typical theravadin buddhist day?

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A typical theravadin buddhist day?

Postby Namu Butsu » Sat Jul 18, 2009 11:09 pm

Namaste,

I am wondering what a typical Theravadin buddhist day would be. What I mean by that is would there be a daily schedule? Would there be a morning practice and if so what type of practice? Also would there be a practice at night aswell?

And do Theravadin buddhist have a concept of AUM (OM)?

:buddha1:
"It was only when I went to China in 1954-55 that I actually studied Marxist ideology and learned the history of the Chinese revolution. Once I understood Marxism, my attitude changed completely. I was so attracted to Marxism, I even expressed my wish to become a Communist Party member."-Dalai Lama (Time Magazine 1999)
http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma3/vegi.html (Meat eating and vegetarianism)
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Re: A typical theravadin buddhist day?

Postby Ben » Sat Jul 18, 2009 11:45 pm

Hi Namu Butsu

I think you'll get different answers depending on who you talk to.
My own day begins with an hour meditation (mainly vipassana) in the morning and again in the evening while following the five precepts during the day.

Here's a thread, with a link to an online resource, to a document written by Phra Kantipallo on lay daily practice,
viewtopic.php?f=14&t=1823&view=unread#p23959
Metta

Ben

EDIT: I just want to add that I don't actually consider myself 'typical', more likely idiosyncratic.
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725


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Re: A typical theravadin buddhist day?

Postby Namu Butsu » Sun Jul 19, 2009 12:42 am

Namaste,

Hey ben, you know I think that is sufficient 1 hour in morning and again in evening. Though it would be hard for me if I decided to do 1 hour in evening aswell. The mornings is quite easy. I was just curious because I wasnt sure if Theravadins do chants etc.. I am still deciding on a Buddhist tradition and also wondering if I will take up Buddhist practice or just do some Hindu practices. But I am keeping my mind open :)

:reading:
"It was only when I went to China in 1954-55 that I actually studied Marxist ideology and learned the history of the Chinese revolution. Once I understood Marxism, my attitude changed completely. I was so attracted to Marxism, I even expressed my wish to become a Communist Party member."-Dalai Lama (Time Magazine 1999)
http://www.urbandharma.org/udharma3/vegi.html (Meat eating and vegetarianism)
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Re: A typical theravadin buddhist day?

Postby kc2dpt » Sun Jul 19, 2009 1:35 am

Let's see... woken up by the wife, quick breakfast, drove her and kid to the bus, put wife on bus and consoled kid, bought some phone splice thingies at the store, ate dim sum, took kid to playground, took kid home and we both took a nap, surfed web, played with kid outside, made dinner, read books to kid, put kid to bed, watched tv, surfed web.

Pretty typical for me. Where's the Theravada Buddhism you ask? Well, everything I do I do with an understanding of the teachings. Everything I see is through that framework. And things get contemplated through that framework more or less throughout the day - problems understood, decisions made, etc. More or less as mindfulness arises and fails to arise throughout the day.

Anger arises at another driver? Unwholesome, try to let it go.
Urge to complain about my day arises? Unwholesome, try to let it go.
Patience arises at my kid's bottomless need for attention? Wholesome, try to encourage it.
Joy arises at hearing my wife's good news? Wholesome, try to encourage it.
Etc.

And when mindfulness doesn't arise then I'm just like any other shlub - anger, impatience, greed, lust, etc. Hopefully there's a point of reflection later where I remind myself those are unwholesome and resolve to catch them sooner next time.

Sometimes late at night I'll pull out some scripture and read to remind and inspire myself for tomorrow.

Before I had a kid there was more temple going, retreat attending, home sitting, monk lectures, etc.

I hope this is helpful.
- Peter

Be heedful and you will accomplish your goal.
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Re: A typical theravadin buddhist day?

Postby Ben » Sun Jul 19, 2009 4:31 am

Hi Namu Butsu
Yes, there is chanting in the theravada.
Here's something that Bhikkhu Pesala published a few years ago which is based on the Burmese chanting guide and includes chants for morning and evening recitation. These chants are probably a little different to the chants in mahayana and vajrayana as one 'chants' or recites passages from the tipitaka.
http://www.aimwell.org/Books/Suttas/suttas.html
Scroll down to Burmese Chanting Guide and download the pdf.

Having said that, there is a meditation which uses the mantra 'buddho' as an adjunct to observing the in-breath and out-breath.
Perhaps others will say more about that particular technique as it is not one that I am familiar with.
Metta

Ben
Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.

Taṃ nadīhi vijānātha:
sobbhesu padaresu ca,
saṇantā yanti kusobbhā,
tuṇhīyanti mahodadhī.

Sutta Nipata 3.725


Compassionate Hands Foundation (Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • Buddhist Global ReliefUNHCR
Buddhist Life Stories of Australia

e: ben.dhammawheel@gmail.com
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Re: A typical theravadin buddhist day?

Postby genkaku » Sun Jul 19, 2009 11:58 am

Hi NB -- My understanding is that Buddhists do not include "aum" within their lexicon of discussions and texts. In a manner of speaking, therefore, they do not 'believe' in it. It's a Hindu thing.

But as you go along deciding your route, perhaps you will want to consider: On the one hand "aum" might be considered as a name for the ineffable, a name for what cannot be named. As such, people may discuss "aum" or argue about "aum" or write lengthy texts that focus on "aum." They can even believe in "aum." It's a starting point, perhaps.

But on the other hand, "aum" is just what is. It's not really all that fancy. Suppose, on a lovely day, you ran into someone who said he believed deeply in the blue sky above. Well, wouldn't you wonder a little ... of course the sky is blue, why would anyone make a fetish or belief system out of it? Why would anyone drop to his knees? Why would anyone sing praises? The sky is blue after all ... it's just a fact. Under a blue sky, Buddhists and Hindus and Muslims and Christians and Jews and Jains and convicts and saints ... no one needs to concern themselves, no one needs to run around spouting ecumenical nonsense. The blue sky is blue ... pay attention, take responsibility and "aum" will take care of itself.

Just a thought.
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