Ekayana

Textual analysis and comparative discussion on early Buddhist sects and texts.

Ekayana

Postby PadmaPhala » Sat Jun 22, 2013 6:42 pm

was it an actual school?
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Re: Ekayana

Postby Nyana » Sat Jun 22, 2013 9:17 pm

PadmaPhala wrote:was it an actual school?

I don't think so. But one version or another was eventually absorbed into most or all Indo-Tibetan and East Asian Mahāyāna exegetical traditions.
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Re: Ekayana

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Sat Jun 22, 2013 9:41 pm

As far as I know, it is just a creative invention to illustrate the importance of not being too attached to one's own chosen school or Buddhist tradition.

The Ekayāna
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Re: Ekayana

Postby lyndon taylor » Sat Jun 22, 2013 11:25 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala, I'm incredibly impressed by your teaching in the link above,and your website, which I'd never noticed at the bottom of your posts, Its just what I need to study, there's so much I've forgotten, and didn't have time to learn when I lived at the temple. Metta, mega Metta,
18 years ago I made one of the most important decisions of my life and entered a local Cambodian Buddhist Temple as a temple boy and, for only 3 weeks, an actual Therevada Buddhist monk. I am not a scholar, great meditator, or authority on Buddhism, but Buddhism is something I love from the Bottom of my heart. It has taught me sobriety, morality, peace, and very importantly that my suffering is optional, and doesn't have to run my life. I hope to give back what little I can to the Buddhist community that has so generously given me so much, sincerely former monk John
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Re: Ekayana

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Sun Jun 23, 2013 4:14 am

lyndon taylor wrote:Its just what I need to study, there's so much I've forgotten, and didn't have time to learn when I lived at the temple. Metta, mega Metta,

Sad, but true, in many Buddhist temples the monks and novices don't have time to learn very much. They're either too busy performing rituals or too busy with building and maintenance work.

Of course, practice is more important than study, but without learning at least the basics about the teachings one won't be able to tell the difference between the direct or only path (ekāyana) and the exclusive vehicle (ekayāna).
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Re: Ekayana

Postby PadmaPhala » Sun Jun 23, 2013 5:30 am

# attachment to rites and rituals...
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Re: Ekayana

Postby IanAnd » Sun Jun 23, 2013 5:23 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:
PadmaPhala wrote: [Ekayana . . .] was it an actual school?

As far as I know, it is just a creative invention to illustrate the importance of not being too attached to one's own chosen school or Buddhist tradition.

The Ekayāna

It seems to be more a view toward practice than a school, as Venerable has somewhat implied.

I agree with Bhk. Pesala if his impression can be taken as accurate (and I'm assuming it is), that:

    The Ekayāna
    As everyone should know, there is really only one path to the goal. That is the pure Vipassanā Satipatthāna method. As the Buddha said, “Ekayāno ayam bhikkhave maggo ... this, monks, is the only way.”

    These narrow-minded people are on the right track, but their practice is immature. They know very little of the great breadth and depth of the Buddha’s teachings. They know about respiration meditation, as that is mentioned first in the Satipatthāna Sutta, but they think that that is the only teaching in the Satipatthāna Sutta. Anyone practising another method is regarded as giving off “bad vibrations” so you shouldn’t meditate in the same room as Ekayānists unless you follow the same practice.
Then those who focus their practice on only this one sutta, as Venerable has stated, are missing the "great breadth and depth of the Buddha's teachings."

The practice method espoused in the Satipatthāna Suttas are important, no doubt, especially for those who wish to achieve a quick ending of dukkha. They are the direct path to self realization and awakening. This is because they bring the focus back to the observation of the mind, where all problems concerning dukkha (the experience of dukkha) have their beginning. When seen with wisdom (panna) one can then take steps to alleviate the occurrence of dukkha within one's experience. Because isn't that, after all, the simple essence of what Gotama taught: "Formerly, Anuradha, and also now, I make known just suffering and the cessation of suffering."
"The gift of truth exceeds all other gifts" — Dhammapada, v. 354 Craving XXIV
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Re: Ekayana

Postby IanAnd » Sun Jun 23, 2013 6:15 pm

PadmaPhala wrote:
Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:
lyndon taylor wrote:Its just what I need to study, there's so much I've forgotten, and didn't have time to learn when I lived at the temple. Metta, mega Metta,

Sad, but true, in many Buddhist temples the monks and novices don't have time to learn very much. They're either too busy performing rituals or too busy with building and maintenance work.

Of course, practice is more important than study, but without learning at least the basics about the teachings one won't be able to tell the difference between the direct or only path (ekāyana) and the exclusive vehicle (ekayāna).

# attachment to rites and rituals...

You bring up a very good point that may be often overlooked in various monastic communities. Or maybe it is just assumed that with the accumulation of greater experience, one will pick up on these things (learning the Dhamma) much quicker as they grow older and (presumably) wiser.

The fact that "monks and novices are too busy performing rituals or too busy with [other manual] work" I don't think presumes an actual "attachment" to rites and rituals, but that these are things that the leadership (abbots) have determined to focus young monks upon in the course of their training. These actions (performing rituals and other work) emphasize a practice methodology of paying attention to the present moment (the practice of mindfulness, in other words; the cultivation of sati). It becomes part of the practice and training regimen of new members within the community.

What I do think is important is that there be time set aside for monks and novices who wish to study the teachings in more depth, that that be available to them on a regular basis. That time be set aside in the curriculum for such. And, sadly, as Venerable has mention, this is often not the case.

I recognized the need for this many years ago as a monk myself. When it wasn't being met, I picked up my things and left the religious order (a Western religious order, to be clear), and began seeking it on my own. The saving grace came in the form of the availability of the translated discourses of the Buddha, which I began to collect and read for myself first hand and implement in my daily practice. Study of the teachings became a full-time endeavor, together with meditation/contemplation practice. This study (combined with meditation practice) is what made all the difference in the world. I wish someone had focused me on this much sooner as it would have saved me many years of needless wallowing in dukkha.

I think it is fair to say that every individual is unique in his needs with regard to learning the Dhamma and being able to arrive at certain key realizations. Some need to focus more on study than on practice, and vice versa. It all just depends upon the individual. Ideally, a nice medium in these two endeavors would be most beneficial. That's what I strove for. In my particular case, in addition to reading the suttas, it was Bhikkhu Nanananda's two books (Concept and Reality and The Magic of the Mind) that really helped me turn the corner and got me over the hump (so to speak).
"The gift of truth exceeds all other gifts" — Dhammapada, v. 354 Craving XXIV
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Re: Ekayana

Postby retrofuturist » Mon Jun 24, 2013 1:38 am

As always, excellent postings Ian.

Thank you.

Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Ekayana

Postby daimond » Fri Jun 28, 2013 6:37 pm

well, in Indonesia not far away from my home there Ekayana Graha Arama (increase from the past "Vihara Ekayana Graha" ), it's Mahayana vihara but this follow the Ekayana prinsiple all Budhist teaching right now are back to the origin Buddha Sakyamuni teaching, so open to diffrent stream to come together, so people could learn a wisdom from diffrent stream (okay something like that).

In this vihara (event) regulary there bhikku from Mahayana, Theravada, Vajrayana and bhikkuni Mahayana present together in the event.
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Re: Ekayana

Postby PadmaPhala » Wed Jul 17, 2013 7:57 pm

what about self*-ordainment?

urban buddhist monk... since, now [re-affirmation of past vows]
about to be ordained in Zen Rinzai if they don't follow the celibate+non-work dogma [can't remember the actual school],
if not Thai Theravada Forest Tradition or Vajrayana Nyingma.

*there's a sutric excerpt about the use of personal pronouns, etc

:toast:
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