Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

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Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Dmytro » Tue Oct 19, 2010 8:56 pm

Hello Pali friends,

I'll just repost here the excellent explanation of Ven.Dhammanando at E-Sangha:

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Idappaccayatā = idaṃ + paccaya + tā.

‘Idaṃ’ means ‘this’, being the neuter nominative or accusative singular of the adjective/pronoun ‘ima’. However, when ‘idaṃ’ occurs in a compound word, with elision of the niggahīta, it may stand for any of the oblique cases of ‘ima’. Here it is understood by the commentators to stand for ‘imesaṃ’, the genitive plural — ‘of these’.

‘Paccaya’ = ‘paccayā’ (nominative plural) — conditions.

The suffix ‘-tā’ forms a noun of state, like the English ‘-ness’.

Literally: “conditions-of-these-ness”.

Intelligibly: “state [of being] the conditions of these”, where ‘these’ denotes old age, sickness, death and all the other items comprehended within the paṭiccasamuppāda formula.

So, that's one commentarial parsing of it. In another, less favoured by English translators, the suffix -tā is treated as redundant and so we get “idappaccayā eva” (“just the conditions of these”).

Maurice Walshe (Long Discourses): “the conditioned nature of things.”
Bodhi/Ñāṇamoli (Connected Discourses, Middle Length Discourses etc.): “specific conditionality.”
U Thittila (Book of Analysis): “specific causality.”
Pe Maung Tin (The Expositor): “specifically assignable causality.”

I think the last one is the best.

More from Pe Maung Tin, in his translation of the Dhammasaṅganī Atthakathā:

‘dvādasapadikaṃ paccayavaṭṭaṃ atthi nu kho natthī’ ti kaṅkhanto __idappaccayatāpaṭiccasamuppannesu dhammesu kaṅkhati_ nāma. tatrāyaṃ vacanattho — imesaṃ jarāmaraṇādīnaṃ paccayā ‘idappaccayā’. idappaccayānaṃ bhāvo ‘idappaccayatā’. idappaccayā eva vā ‘idappaccayatā’ ; jātiādīnametaṃ adhivacanaṃ. jātiādīsu taṃ taṃ paṭicca āgamma samuppannāti ‘paṭiccasamuppannā’. idaṃ vuttaṃ hoti — idappaccayatāya ca paṭiccasamuppannesu ca dhammesu kaṅkhatīti.
(DhsA. 355)

In doubting thus: ‘Is there, or is there not the round of the twelve causes?’ he is said to doubt these causally generated dhammas. Herein the word-definition is: ‘The causes of these dhammas, decay and death etc., are specifically assignable causes.’ ‘Specifically assignable causality’ is the state of such assignable causes. The two expressions are identical, and are synonyms here of birth etc. Birth and the rest of the series are said to be causally generated in the sense ‘come to pass because of, in consequence of.’ Or, he doubts the specifically assignable causation of dhammas which are causally generated.
(Expositor II. 458)



Best wishes,
Dhammanando Bhikkhu

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Metta, Dmytro
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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Thu Oct 21, 2010 11:04 am

Dmytro wrote:
Idappaccayatā = idaṃ + paccaya + tā.


As a general point I'm still not clear about the basic difference between paticcasamupada and idappaccayata, since both appear to be about conditionality. I have an idea that idappaccayata represents the general principle of conditionality, while paticcasamupada is the specific application to dukkha - but is the difference more basic than this?

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Dmytro » Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:05 pm

Spiny O'Norman wrote:As a general point I'm still not clear about the basic difference between paticcasamupada and idappaccayata, since both appear to be about conditionality.


They reflect the state of things from two sides - paticcasammupadda from the side of things that arise depending on conditions, and idapaccayata from the side of these conditions.

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Dmytro » Thu Oct 21, 2010 1:12 pm

Ven.Thanissaro writes:

The Buddha expressed this/that conditionality in a simple-looking formula:

(1) When this is, that is.
(2) From the arising of this comes the arising of that.
(3) When this isn't, that isn't.
(4) From the stopping of this comes the stopping of that.

— AN 10.92

There are many possible ways of interpreting this formula, but only one does justice both to the way the formula is worded and to the complex, fluid manner in which specific examples of causal relationships are described in the Canon. That way is to view the formula as the interplay of two causal principles, one linear and the other synchronic, that combine to form a non-linear pattern. The linear principle — taking (2) and (4) as a pair — connects events, rather than objects, over time; the synchronic principle — (1) and (3) — connects objects and events in the present moment.


http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... index.html

However the Pali formula:

imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti;
imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati;
imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti;
imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati.

is explained in

Dutiya-Ariyasavaka sutta (SN 2.79):

‘imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti, imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati. Avijjaaya sati sa"nkhaaraa honti; sa"nkhaaresu sati vi~n~naa.na.m hoti; vi~n~naa.ne sati naamaruupa.m hoti; naamaruupe sati sa.laayatana.m hoti; sa.laayatane sati phasso hoti; phasse sati vedanaa hoti; vedanaaya sati ta.nhaa hoti; ta.nhaaya sati upaadaana.m hoti; upaadaane sati bhavo hoti; bhave sati jaati hoti; jaatiyaa sati jaraamara.na.m hotii’ti.

‘imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti, imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati. Avijjaaya asati sa"nkhaaraa na honti; sa"nkhaaresu asati vi~n~naa.na.m na hoti; vi~n~naa.ne asati naamaruupa.m na hoti; naamaruupe asati sa.laayatana.m na hoti …pe… jaatiyaa asati jaraamara.na.m na hotii’ti

It's all the same type of causality, the relationship of requisite condition (paccaya).
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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Sat Oct 23, 2010 11:34 am

Dmytro wrote:
Spiny O'Norman wrote:As a general point I'm still not clear about the basic difference between paticcasamupada and idappaccayata, since both appear to be about conditionality.


They reflect the state of things from two sides - paticcasammupadda from the side of things that arise depending on conditions, and idapaccayata from the side of these conditions.

Dmytro


I'm not sure I understand this distinction - aren't both describing the process of conditioned arising?

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby retrofuturist » Sat Oct 23, 2010 11:44 am

Greetings,

Some reflections on alternative translations from venerable Nanananda from http://nidahas.com/2010/09/nanananda-heretic-sage-2/ ...

I also made a mistake inadvertently when translating: in early editions of The Magic of the Mind I used ‘this/that’ following the standard English translations. That’s com­pletely wrong. It should be ‘this/this’.

In the formula we must take two elements that make a pair and analyse the conditionality between them. ‘That’ implies some thing out side the pair, which is misleading. Paṭiccasamuppāda is to be seen among the elements in a pair. The trick is in the middle; there’s no point in holding on to the ends. And even that middle needs to be let go of, not grasped.


Metta,
Retro. :)
If you have asked me of the origination of unease, then I shall explain it to you in accordance with my understanding:
Whatever various forms of unease there are in the world, They originate founded in encumbering accumulation. (Pārāyanavagga)


Exalted in mind, just open and clearly aware, the recluse trained in the ways of the sages:
One who is such, calmed and ever mindful, He has no sorrows! -- Udana IV, 7


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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Sun Oct 24, 2010 10:59 am

retrofuturist wrote:Greetings,

Some reflections on alternative translations from venerable Nanananda from http://nidahas.com/2010/09/nanananda-heretic-sage-2/ ...

I also made a mistake inadvertently when translating: in early editions of The Magic of the Mind I used ‘this/that’ following the standard English translations. That’s com­pletely wrong. It should be ‘this/this’.

In the formula we must take two elements that make a pair and analyse the conditionality between them. ‘That’ implies some thing out side the pair, which is misleading. Paṭiccasamuppāda is to be seen among the elements in a pair. The trick is in the middle; there’s no point in holding on to the ends. And even that middle needs to be let go of, not grasped.


Metta,
Retro. :)


Thanks Retro. I think I see what Nanananda is getting at, that conditionality is about the relationship between two elements. However I'm not convinced that "From the arising of this comes the arising of this" conveys it any more clearly than "From the arising of this comes the arising of that."

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Sobeh » Sun Oct 24, 2010 5:42 pm

Spiny O'Norman wrote:However I'm not convinced that "From the arising of this comes the arising of this" conveys it any more clearly than "From the arising of this comes the arising of that."

Spiny


It's actually an essential distinction, thus:

"But, Udāyi, let be the past, let be the future, I shall set you forth the Teaching: When there is this this is, with arising of this this arises; when there is not this this is not, with cessation of this this ceases."

The formula is never conveyed as this/that, only "this/this and not this/not this", for the reason given by Nanananda.
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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Dmytro » Mon Oct 25, 2010 5:10 pm

Hi Spiny,

Spiny O'Norman wrote:I'm not sure I understand this distinction - aren't both describing the process of conditioned arising?


There are things that arise and there are conditions on which this arising depends.

"Idappaccayatā" refers to the "conditioning" part.

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:45 am

Dmytro wrote:Hi Spiny,

Spiny O'Norman wrote:I'm not sure I understand this distinction - aren't both describing the process of conditioned arising?


There are things that arise and there are conditions on which this arising depends.

"Idappaccayatā" refers to the "conditioning" part.

Dmytro


Thanks, but I'm still not getting it. Doesn't the general formula "From the arising of this comes the arising of this/that." include both the condition and the "thing" that arises?
Also, doesn't paticcasamupada include both condition and dependent arising, eg feeling is both a condition for craving and a "result" of contact?

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Tue Oct 26, 2010 11:50 am

Sobeh wrote:
Spiny O'Norman wrote:However I'm not convinced that "From the arising of this comes the arising of this" conveys it any more clearly than "From the arising of this comes the arising of that."

Spiny


It's actually an essential distinction, thus:

"But, Udāyi, let be the past, let be the future, I shall set you forth the Teaching: When there is this this is, with arising of this this arises; when there is not this this is not, with cessation of this this ceases."

The formula is never conveyed as this/that, only "this/this and not this/not this", for the reason given by Nanananda.


But doesn't the Pali suggest this/that rather than this/this?

imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti;
imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati;
imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti;
imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati.

I'm still not clear what's wrong with this/that in a practical sense.

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby mikenz66 » Tue Oct 26, 2010 10:52 pm

Hi Spiney,

I'm similarly baffled, and I'm sure I'm missing some subtle point. I wondered if it was just a question of whether Pali did not have two different words for "this" and "that". I think that many languages do not. In general many languages have a lot less words than English, so the variety of language we tend to use in English is simply not available.

Like you, I cannot discern any difference in meaning between:
From this [X] this [Y] arises.
From this [X] that [Y] arises.
(Assuming, of course, that Y is not the same as X).

Must be my poor language skills, or it may be that in the Sri Lankan dialect of English there is some distinction, and this is what Ven Nanananda is trying to explain.

I'm actually being serious here - there are significant differences between accepted practise in the various English dialects that exist around the world, despite the quaint idea that some English (or American!) people have that there is one single English dialect...

Mike
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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Dmytro » Wed Oct 27, 2010 7:13 am

Spiny O'Norman wrote:Thanks, but I'm still not getting it. Doesn't the general formula "From the arising of this comes the arising of this/that." include both the condition and the "thing" that arises?


I have not found in the Sutta any direct link between 'idappaccayatā' and the formula

imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti;
imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati;
imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti;
imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati.

It seems that Ven.Thanissaro linked them through the word 'idaṃ', and Ven. Ñanananda followed his example.

Also, doesn't paticcasamupada include both condition and dependent arising, eg feeling is both a condition for craving and a "result" of contact?


"Conditionality" and "Conditioned Arising" refer to the same law, but the words are different.

But doesn't the Pali suggest this/that rather than this/this?

imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti;
imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati;
imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti;
imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati.


As I've said above, this formula is clearly explained in Dutiya-Ariyasavaka sutta (SN 2.79):

‘imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti, imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati. Avijjaaya sati sa"nkhaaraa honti; sa"nkhaaresu sati vi~n~naa.na.m hoti; vi~n~naa.ne sati naamaruupa.m hoti; naamaruupe sati sa.laayatana.m hoti; sa.laayatane sati phasso hoti; phasse sati vedanaa hoti; vedanaaya sati ta.nhaa hoti; ta.nhaaya sati upaadaana.m hoti; upaadaane sati bhavo hoti; bhave sati jaati hoti; jaatiyaa sati jaraamara.na.m hotii’ti.

‘imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti, imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati. Avijjaaya asati sa"nkhaaraa na honti; sa"nkhaaresu asati vi~n~naa.na.m na hoti; vi~n~naa.ne asati naamaruupa.m na hoti; naamaruupe asati sa.laayatana.m na hoti …pe… jaatiyaa asati jaraamara.na.m na hotii’ti

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Wed Oct 27, 2010 9:39 am

Dmytro wrote:As I've said above, this formula is clearly explained in Dutiya-Ariyasavaka sutta (SN 2.79):

‘imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti, imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati. Avijjaaya sati sa"nkhaaraa honti; sa"nkhaaresu sati vi~n~naa.na.m hoti; vi~n~naa.ne sati naamaruupa.m hoti; naamaruupe sati sa.laayatana.m hoti; sa.laayatane sati phasso hoti; phasse sati vedanaa hoti; vedanaaya sati ta.nhaa hoti; ta.nhaaya sati upaadaana.m hoti; upaadaane sati bhavo hoti; bhave sati jaati hoti; jaatiyaa sati jaraamara.na.m hotii’ti.

‘imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti, imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati. Avijjaaya asati sa"nkhaaraa na honti; sa"nkhaaresu asati vi~n~naa.na.m na hoti; vi~n~naa.ne asati naamaruupa.m na hoti; naamaruupe asati sa.laayatana.m na hoti …pe… jaatiyaa asati jaraamara.na.m na hotii’ti

Dmytro


Thanks. Do you have a translation of this?

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Spiny O'Norman » Wed Oct 27, 2010 10:02 am

mikenz66 wrote:Like you, I cannot discern any difference in meaning between:
From this [X] this [Y] arises.
From this [X] that [Y] arises.
(Assuming, of course, that Y is not the same as X).



Yes, I'm also working on the assumption that Y is not the same as X, in which case this/this appears confusing - but I'm also worried that I'm missing a subtle point!
It's beginning to sound like something Nargajuna said.... ;)

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Dmytro » Wed Oct 27, 2010 12:03 pm

‘imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti, imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati.

"When this is, that is, when this arises, that arises.

Avijjaaya sati sa"nkhaaraa honti; sa"nkhaaresu sati vi~n~naa.na.m hoti; vi~n~naa.ne sati naamaruupa.m hoti; naamaruupe sati sa.laayatana.m hoti; sa.laayatane sati phasso hoti; phasse sati vedanaa hoti; vedanaaya sati ta.nhaa hoti; ta.nhaaya sati upaadaana.m hoti; upaadaane sati bhavo hoti; bhave sati jaati hoti; jaatiyaa sati jaraamara.na.m hotii’ti.

When there's ignorance, there are volitions; ... when there's birth, there's aging and death.

‘imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti, imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati.

"When this isn't, that isn't, when this ceases, that ceases.

Avijjaaya asati sa"nkhaaraa na honti; sa"nkhaaresu asati vi~n~naa.na.m na hoti; vi~n~naa.ne asati naamaruupa.m na hoti; naamaruupe asati sa.laayatana.m na hoti …pe… jaatiyaa asati jaraamara.na.m na hotii’ti

When there's no ignorance, there are no volitions; ... when there's no birth, there's no aging and death.

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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Dmytro » Tue Sep 18, 2012 5:48 am

Dmytro wrote:Dutiya-Ariyasavaka sutta (SN 2.79):

‘imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti, imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati. Avijjaaya sati sa"nkhaaraa honti; sa"nkhaaresu sati vi~n~naa.na.m hoti; vi~n~naa.ne sati naamaruupa.m hoti; naamaruupe sati sa.laayatana.m hoti; sa.laayatane sati phasso hoti; phasse sati vedanaa hoti; vedanaaya sati ta.nhaa hoti; ta.nhaaya sati upaadaana.m hoti; upaadaane sati bhavo hoti; bhave sati jaati hoti; jaatiyaa sati jaraamara.na.m hotii’ti.

‘imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti, imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati. Avijjaaya asati sa"nkhaaraa na honti; sa"nkhaaresu asati vi~n~naa.na.m na hoti; vi~n~naa.ne asati naamaruupa.m na hoti; naamaruupe asati sa.laayatana.m na hoti …pe… jaatiyaa asati jaraamara.na.m na hotii’ti

It's all the same type of causality, the relationship of requisite condition (paccaya).


Very similar explanation is given in Dasabala sutta (SN ii.27):

Dasabalasuttaṃ

21. Sāvatthiyaṃ viharati…pe… ‘‘dasabalasamannāgato, bhikkhave, tathāgato catūhi ca vesārajjehi samannāgato āsabhaṃ ṭhānaṃ paṭijānāti, parisāsu sīhanādaṃ nadati, brahmacakkaṃ pavatteti – iti rūpaṃ iti rūpassa samudayo iti rūpassa atthaṅgamo, iti vedanā iti vedanāya samudayo iti vedanāya atthaṅgamo, iti saññā iti saññāya samudayo iti saññāya atthaṅgamo, iti saṅkhārā iti saṅkhārānaṃ samudayo iti saṅkhārānaṃ atthaṅgamo, iti viññāṇaṃ iti viññāṇassa samudayo iti viññāṇassa atthaṅgamo. Iti imasmiṃ sati idaṃ hoti, imassuppādā idaṃ uppajjati. Imasmiṃ asati idaṃ na hoti, imassa nirodhā idaṃ nirujjhati. Yadidaṃ avijjāpaccayā saṅkhārā; saṅkhārapaccayā viññāṇaṃ…pe… evametassa kevalassa dukkhakkhandhassa samudayo hoti. Avijjāya tveva asesavirāganirodhā saṅkhāranirodho; saṅkhāranirodhā viññāṇanirodho…pe… evametassa kevalassa dukkhakkhandhassa nirodho hotī’’ti.
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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Sylvester » Sun Jul 07, 2013 2:39 am

mikenz66 wrote:Hi Spiney,

I'm similarly baffled, and I'm sure I'm missing some subtle point. I wondered if it was just a question of whether Pali did not have two different words for "this" and "that". I think that many languages do not. In general many languages have a lot less words than English, so the variety of language we tend to use in English is simply not available.

Like you, I cannot discern any difference in meaning between:
From this [X] this [Y] arises.
From this [X] that [Y] arises.
(Assuming, of course, that Y is not the same as X).

Must be my poor language skills, or it may be that in the Sri Lankan dialect of English there is some distinction, and this is what Ven Nanananda is trying to explain.

I'm actually being serious here - there are significant differences between accepted practise in the various English dialects that exist around the world, despite the quaint idea that some English (or American!) people have that there is one single English dialect...

Mike


Hi Mike

Thought I'd rake up your old post, given some recent ruminations on the Rebirth thread.

It's true that some translators (eg Ven Nanananda cited) translate the idaṃ in "imasmiṃ sati idaṃ hoti" to read as "this", leading to a very peculiar sentence "When there is this this is".

It's totally unnecessary to be so scrupulous, according to Warder. Many of these Pali pronouns are "deictic", such that although the primary meaning of idaṃ is "this", it can also mean "that", if "that" is part of the discussion. Since idappaccayatā is a summary of the nidānas, and each nidāna is a link between a paccaya and its consequent/effect, the idaṃ (as the consequent) should be given its deictic sense as "that", so that the imasmiṃ (loc of "this") is reserved for the paccaya. The better translation would be the more common one that acknowledges the deictic nature of idaṃ .
Last edited by Sylvester on Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:46 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Pali Term: Idappaccayatā

Postby Sylvester » Sun Jul 07, 2013 4:39 am

Spiny O'Norman wrote:
Dmytro wrote:As I've said above, this formula is clearly explained in Dutiya-Ariyasavaka sutta (SN 2.79):

‘imasmi.m sati ida.m hoti, imassuppaadaa ida.m uppajjati. Avijjaaya sati sa"nkhaaraa honti; sa"nkhaaresu sati vi~n~naa.na.m hoti; vi~n~naa.ne sati naamaruupa.m hoti; naamaruupe sati sa.laayatana.m hoti; sa.laayatane sati phasso hoti; phasse sati vedanaa hoti; vedanaaya sati ta.nhaa hoti; ta.nhaaya sati upaadaana.m hoti; upaadaane sati bhavo hoti; bhave sati jaati hoti; jaatiyaa sati jaraamara.na.m hotii’ti.

‘imasmi.m asati ida.m na hoti, imassa nirodhaa ida.m nirujjhati. Avijjaaya asati sa"nkhaaraa na honti; sa"nkhaaresu asati vi~n~naa.na.m na hoti; vi~n~naa.ne asati naamaruupa.m na hoti; naamaruupe asati sa.laayatana.m na hoti …pe… jaatiyaa asati jaraamara.na.m na hotii’ti

Dmytro


Thanks. Do you have a translation of this?

Spiny


Hi, to add to Dmytro's reply, I would say that this is simply one of the most difficult passages to render into English. I've discussed some of the technicalities in my most recent reply to you in the Rebirth thread. It might be helpful to notice something about the grammar as follows -

Atha kho, bhikkhave, sutavato ariyasāvakassa aparappaccayā ñāṇamevettha hoti – ‘imasmiṃ sati idaṃ hoti, imassuppādā idaṃ uppajjati. (Avijjāya sati saṅkhārā honti; saṅkhāresu sati viññāṇaṃ hoti;) viññāṇe sati nāmarūpaṃ hoti; nāmarūpe sati saḷāyatanaṃ hoti ; saḷāyatane sati phasso hoti; phasse sati vedanā hoti; vedanāya sati taṇhā hoti; taṇhāya sati upādānaṃ hoti; upādāne sati bhavo hoti; bhave sati jāti hoti; jātiyā sati jarāmaraṇaṃ hotī’ti. So evaṃ pajānāti – ‘evamayaṃ loko samudayatī’’’ti.


Each of the clauses rendered in red is a locative absolute construction, ie both the noun and the participle are in the locative case. The issue now is whether this locative absolute is a temporal construction (eg Ven T's and Ven Nanavira's approach) or a causative construction. The grammar does allow for such a locative absolute to carry a temporal sense of simultaneity (ie if the participle were a present participle), but the situations explained as such in Wijesekara's Syntax of the Cases in the Pali Nikayas limit them to sentences comprising adverbial clauses. He gives examples where the LA formed from the participle of an action verb is in the subordinate clause and the primary clause that follows carries another action verb.

However, specifically when it came to 1st and 3rd limbs of idappaccayatā, these do not have any action verbs in them; in place of action verbs, it has a predicate in the subordinate clause and a copula in the primary clause. Wijesekara explains that in this type of idiom, the LA has no temporal value and is a causative construction. He would then translate each of the above LAs as - "when (if, on condition that) there is X, there is Y".

It appears that the Chinese translators of the Agamas were also aware of the causative import of idappaccayatā and therefore translated the 1st limb as either "From this...." or "Because of this....".

What the above sutta seems to be suggesting is that whether one is lensing DO through the 1st limb's perspective, or through the 2nd limb's perspective, it matters not. Both limbs are reducible to the same LA formula outlined in red. It's all about the dependancy of something on its paccaya.
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