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MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta - Dhamma Wheel

MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta

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MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta

Postby jcsuperstar » Tue Jul 28, 2009 6:49 pm

สัพเพ สัตตา สุขีตา โหนตุ

the mountain may be heavy in and of itself, but if you're not trying to carry it it's not heavy to you- Ajaan Suwat

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Re: MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta

Postby rowyourboat » Thu Jul 30, 2009 8:34 am

a few things..

vijjavimutti - 'clear knowing and release' as translated here ' -vijja is the opposite of avijja- hence wisdom or insight might be a better translation IMO, as avijja is delusion and clear knowing maybe confused with clear comprehension (sampajanna).

Note how in and out breaths are felt with body, feelings, mind and insight. The Buddha is clearly not stuck with the Two Truths version of reality (ultimate truth and conventional truth) and doesn't make it a hindrance to progressing further. The mindfulness used here is clearly more broader and less intense, to incorporate these other elements along with the breath- and uses 'conventional' reality. To get to ultimate reality the yogi would have to use highly magnified mindfulness noting fine extremely fine details. This method is highly commendable, but not absolutely necessary by the looks of it. If there is anything which can lead to revulsion, dispassion and cessation (foulness for example, using visualisation, but nevertheless a way to access the truth) then it is a way forward.

Yoniso manasikara- appropriate contemplation/attention, the factor the buddha described as the most useful internal thing in attaining nibbana (see udana), is a verbal pointing out of the truth to oneself, leading to the truths being seen (dassana) in the present moment and leading to dispassion and cessation (see 4 sotapatti anga). Note below that thoughts like 'a cancer an affliction' cannot arise on their own in a prolonged repeated way, unless we intentionally think of them. They are simply a way of 'intensifying' the truth and cutting through avijja. Yonismanasikara becomes an internal spiritual friend who points to the truth. Yoniso manasikara methods are also conventional truth methods.

"A virtuous monk, Kotthita my friend, should attend in an appropriate way (yoniso manasikara) to the five clinging-aggregates as inconstant, stressful, a disease, a cancer, an arrow, painful, an affliction, alien, a dissolution, an emptiness, not-self. Which five? Form as a clinging-aggregate, feeling... perception... fabrications... consciousness as a clinging-aggregate. A virtuous monk should attend in an appropriate way to these five clinging-aggregates as inconstant, stressful, a disease, a cancer, an arrow, painful, an affliction, alien, a dissolution, an emptiness, not-self. For it is possible that a virtuous monk, attending in an appropriate way to these five clinging-aggregates as inconstant... not-self, would realize the fruit of stream-entry."
C:\Documents and Settings\Matheesha\My Documents\important suttas\yoniso manasikara\SN 22_122 Silavant Sutta.mht
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rowyourboat
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Re: MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta

Postby rowyourboat » Sat Aug 01, 2009 1:42 pm

a monk that I respect once suggested that the fact that numbers of student monks mentioned in this sutta does not exceed 40 suggests that true dhamma is being taught. He felt that if followers were in the hundreds that the teaching is likely to be something that simply attracts the masses.
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Re: MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta

Postby rowyourboat » Sat Aug 01, 2009 1:49 pm

I think it is likely that relaxing the actual physical body with the breath leads to pleasant body sensations which can be observed in conjunction with the breath (1st tetrad-->2nd tetrad). Similarly relaxing the mind in a similar manner leads to a mind capable of attaining jhana (2nd tetrad-->3rd tetrad). This prejhanic/jhanic level of samadhi then becomes the foundation for seeing anicca, nirodha etc using the breath. Here the breath is symbolic of all bodies, of all sensations, of all mental phenomena, of everything otherwise it will be difficult to go past sammasana nana, one of the insight knowledges, which sees the three characteristics in all phenomena hence is able to let go of everything.
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Re: MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta

Postby Avery » Sun Aug 02, 2009 11:26 pm

I think it is interesting that this teaching is addressed to monks who are already in a thriving sangha. If they have attained such high states they must already know how to breathe and concentrate, but rather than addressing the novices the Buddha reminds all of them of these simple facts. Perhaps the intention of the long first section is to establish that a compassionate and healthy sangha, far from being an extraneous part of Buddhism, is necessary to create a fertile ground for successful meditation.

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Re: MN 118. Ānāpānasati Sutta

Postby Sanghamitta » Tue Aug 04, 2009 11:37 am

The going for refuge is the door of entrance to the teachings of the Buddha.

Bhikku Bodhi.


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