Kammaṭṭhāna

General discussion of issues related to Theravada Meditation, e.g. meditation postures, developing a regular sitting practice, skillfully relating to difficulties and hindrances, etc.

Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Cittasanto » Fri Jan 16, 2009 11:25 pm

Can anyone tell me what it is?
where its practice derives from?
everything really!
I have my suspicions and if I am correct it would explain something which happened a while ago!
This offering maybe right, or wrong, but it is one, the other, both, or neither!
With Metta
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Individual » Fri Jan 16, 2009 11:42 pm

Manapa wrote:Can anyone tell me what it is?
where its practice derives from?
everything really!
I have my suspicions and if I am correct it would explain something which happened a while ago!

It's the forty objects of meditation from the Visuddhimagga, a commentary written by Buddhaghosa. The list is derived from the meditation practices taught by the Buddha. I don't think it's an all-encompassing list, but it's certainly a very nice one.

Wikipedia's article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kammatthana
The best things in life aren't things.

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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby cooran » Sun Jan 18, 2009 1:40 am

Hello Manapa, all,

Mahasi Sayadaw taught and explained this technique:

http://www.dhammaweb.net/mahasi/book/Ma ... tation.pdf

metta
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Element » Sun Jan 18, 2009 5:37 am

I may be corrected but I have heard kammatthana means 'object of work'.

Kamma here means 'work' such as in the word 'kammaniyo', which means 'ready for work' or 'active'.

Buddha said one quality of samadhi is it is active or pliant. It is sensitive and flexible for the work of introspection or vipassana.
So evaṃ samāhite citte parisuddhe pariyodāte anaṅgaṇe vigatūpakkilese mudubhūte kammaniye ṭhite āneñjappatte āsavānaṃ khayañāṇāya cittaṃ abhininnāmesiṃ.

When the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of defilement, pliant, malleable, steady & attained to imperturbability, I directed it to the knowledge of the ending of the mental fermentations.
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby bodom » Sun Jan 18, 2009 1:44 pm

Element wrote:I may be corrected but I have heard kammatthana means 'object of work'.

Kamma here means 'work' such as in the word 'kammaniyo', which means 'ready for work' or 'active'.

Buddha said one quality of samadhi is it is active or pliant. It is sensitive and flexible for the work of introspection or vipassana.
So evaṃ samāhite citte parisuddhe pariyodāte anaṅgaṇe vigatūpakkilese mudubhūte kammaniye ṭhite āneñjappatte āsavānaṃ khayañāṇāya cittaṃ abhininnāmesiṃ.

When the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of defilement, pliant, malleable, steady & attained to imperturbability, I directed it to the knowledge of the ending of the mental fermentations.


In Buddhism, kammaṭṭhāna is a Pali word (Sanskrit: karmasthana) which literally means the place of work. Figuratively it means the place within the mind where one goes in order to work on spiritual development. More concretely, it refers to the forty canonical objects of meditation (samatha kammaṭṭhāna), listed in the third chapter of the Visuddhimagga.[1]

Buddhaghosa & Nanamoli (1999), p. 90.

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The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Element » Sun Jan 18, 2009 8:02 pm

bodom_bad_boy wrote:In Buddhism, kammaṭṭhāna is a Pali word (Sanskrit: karmasthana) which literally means the place of work. Figuratively it means the place within the mind where one goes in order to work on spiritual development.

Thank you. :smile:
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby bodom » Thu Jan 22, 2009 4:09 pm

The heart of the path is SO simple. No need for long explanations. Give up clinging to love and hate, just rest with things as they are. That is all I do in my own practice. Do not try to become anything. Do not make yourself into anything. Do not be a meditator. Do not become enlightened. When you sit, let it be. When you walk, let it be. Grasp at nothing. Resist nothing. Of course, there are dozens of meditation techniques to develop samadhi and many kinds of vipassana. But it all comes back to this - just let it all be. Step over here where it is cool, out of the battle. - Ajahn Chah
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