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Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions? - Page 4 - Dhamma Wheel

Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Exploring Theravāda's connections to other paths. What can we learn from other traditions, religions and philosophies?
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christopher:::
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby christopher::: » Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:11 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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tiltbillings
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Aug 05, 2009 6:11 am

It is not that you are forcing others to believe the way you do. I did not say that. What I did say is forcing Buddhist views/doctrrines to say things they do not actually say.

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christopher:::
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby christopher::: » Wed Aug 05, 2009 11:39 am

They can't be forced Tilt. You view them as you do, others view the dharma differently. Each school of Buddhism puts a different interpretation and emphasis on some the teachings, no? Each person brings their own background. Nothing and no one can be forced. It's just impossible. Also, i don't recall ever debating the meaning of teachings from the Pali canon with you.

In Zen Buddhism we had a great patriarch Seng Tsan who cautioned specifically against clinging too tightly to any particular view. If there is no teaching of a similar type in Theravadin Buddhism then we simply have another example of a difference.

In discussions like this, at a certain point i eventually recognize the futility of debating and walk away, cause its endless. Usually when i do that its cause i've reflected on Seng Tsan's verses and realized there was nothing left to be said. These are not verses from the Pali Canon, these are teachings of a highly respected Chinese Chan Master.

You may not see the utility in them, and that's fine.

:namaste:



The Great Way is not difficult for those who have no preferences. When love and hate are both absent everything becomes clear and undisguised.

Make the smallest distinction however and heaven and earth are set infinitely apart. If you wish to see the truth then hold no opinions for or against anything. To set-up what you like against what you dislike is the disease of the mind.

When the deep meaning of things is not understood the mind's essential peace is disturbed to no avail. The Way is perfect like vast space where nothing is lacking and nothing is in excess. Indeed, it is due to our choosing to accept or reject that we do not see the true nature of things.

Live neither in the entanglements of outer things nor in the inner feelings of emptiness. Be serene in the Oneness of things and such erroneous views will disappear by themselves. When you try to stop activity to achieve passivity your very effort fills you with activity.

As long as you remain in one extreme or the other you will never know Oneness. Those who do not live in the single Way fail in both activity and passivity, assertion and denial. To deny the reality of things is to miss their reality; to assert the emptiness of things is to miss their reality.

The more you talk and think about it the further astray you wander from the truth. Stop talking and thinking and there is nothing you will not be able to know.

Do not search for the truth only cease to cherish opinions. Do not remain in a dualistic state avoid such pursuits carefully. If there is even a trace of this and that, of right and wrong, the Mind-essence will be lost in confusion.

Although all dualities come from the One do not be attached even to the One. When the mind exists undisturbed in the Way nothing in the world can offend. And when things can no longer offend it ceases to exist in the old way.

When no discriminating thoughts arise the old mind ceases to exist.


:heart:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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tiltbillings
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby tiltbillings » Wed Aug 05, 2009 5:26 pm


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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby chicka-Dee » Wed Aug 05, 2009 8:17 pm


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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby christopher::: » Fri Aug 07, 2009 2:50 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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tiltbillings
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:02 am


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kc2dpt
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby kc2dpt » Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:09 am

Saying "only Buddhism provides any value and no other religion provides any value" is one extreme.
Saying "all religions teach the same thing" is another extreme.
Surely we can conceive some points in between?
- Peter


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christopher:::
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby christopher::: » Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:17 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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tiltbillings
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:21 am


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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby christopher::: » Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:43 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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mikenz66
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby mikenz66 » Fri Aug 07, 2009 4:44 am


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christopher:::
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby christopher::: » Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:16 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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Pannapetar
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby Pannapetar » Fri Aug 07, 2009 9:09 am


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christopher:::
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby christopher::: » Fri Aug 07, 2009 1:48 pm

I think so too, Thomas.

Yesterday my son and I visited with an old friend of mine, Jen, from elementary school. I dropped by her house, to share some music I had, hang out a bit. Noticed she had a big buddha statue sitting in her living room. I mentioned meditation, she said she was always interested. I taught her how to sit! This morning she wrote she just did it again... She'll be dropping by later as she walks her dog, i plan to give her one of these books i bought. I think "How to Practice" by HHDL would be good for her.

The night before i went out with my jr high buddy Ken. Ended up leaving the Dhammapada in his car.

Life moves and connects in interesting ways. And i cant seem to hold on to books!!

:tongue:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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tiltbillings
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Aug 07, 2009 3:50 pm


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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby chicka-Dee » Fri Aug 07, 2009 4:07 pm


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tiltbillings
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby tiltbillings » Fri Aug 07, 2009 5:21 pm


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kc2dpt
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby kc2dpt » Fri Aug 07, 2009 6:44 pm

- Peter


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kc2dpt
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Re: Should Buddhists be Tolerant of Other Religions?

Postby kc2dpt » Fri Aug 07, 2009 6:45 pm

- Peter



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