When a translator needs a vacation

Textual analysis and comparative discussion on early Buddhist sects and texts.
tharpa
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When a translator needs a vacation

Postby tharpa » Thu Nov 14, 2013 12:04 am

In PTS's Jaataka I & II, translated by Rouse, the Kacchapa-Jaataka is translated into Latin rather than English.

It's dry humor, I know, but you have to take what you can get with the Tipitika.

As the former Dhammapiti Bhikkhu once said, "The Theravada is so dry that sand comes out of your ears."

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tiltbillings
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Re: When a translator needs a vacation

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Nov 14, 2013 1:42 am

tharpa wrote:In PTS's Jaataka I & II, translated by Rouse, the Kacchapa-Jaataka is translated into Latin rather than English.

It's dry humor, I know, but you have to take what you can get with the Tipitika.

As the former Dhammapiti Bhikkhu once said, "The Theravada is so dry that sand comes out of your ears."
There is a lot of humor in the Pali suttas, some of it very pointed.
This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

dheamhan a fhios agam

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson

tharpa
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Re: When a translator needs a vacation

Postby tharpa » Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:14 am

Frinstance?

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tiltbillings
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Re: When a translator needs a vacation

Postby tiltbillings » Thu Nov 14, 2013 2:58 am

This being is bound to samsara, kamma is his means for going beyond.
SN I, 38.

Ar scáth a chéile a mhaireas na daoine.
People live in one another’s shelter.

dheamhan a fhios agam

"We eat cold eels and think distant thoughts." -- Jack Johnson

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reflection
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Re: When a translator needs a vacation

Postby reflection » Thu Nov 14, 2013 6:31 am

I laughed so many times when reading the suttas. I guess it depends on the way you look at it.

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Bhikkhu Pesala
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Re: When a translator needs a vacation

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Thu Nov 14, 2013 10:15 am

tharpa wrote:In PTS's Jaataka I & II, translated by Rouse, the Kacchapa-Jaataka is translated into Latin rather than English.

It's dry humor, I know, but you have to take what you can get with the Tipitika.

As the former Dhammapiti Bhikkhu once said, "The Theravada is so dry that sand comes out of your ears."

Probably because the content was too blue to publish at the time the translations were published.
3. Kacchapa Jātaka (No. 273).– The story of how a monkey insulted a turtle by introducing his private parts into the turtle as the latter lay basking in the sun with his mouth open. The turtle caught hold of the monkey and refused to release him. The monkey went for help, and the Bodhisatta, who was an ascetic in a hermitage nearby, saw the monkey carrying the turtle. The Bodhisatta persuaded the turtle to release the monkey.

The story was related in reference to the quarrelsome ministers of the king of Kosala. J.ii.359-61.
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Re: When a translator needs a vacation

Postby tharpa » Thu Nov 14, 2013 12:44 pm

Bhikkhu Pesala wrote:
tharpa wrote:In PTS's Jaataka I & II, translated by Rouse, the Kacchapa-Jaataka is translated into Latin rather than English.

It's dry humor, I know, but you have to take what you can get with the Tipitika.

As the former Dhammapiti Bhikkhu once said, "The Theravada is so dry that sand comes out of your ears."

Probably because the content was too blue to publish at the time the translations were published.
3. Kacchapa Jātaka (No. 273).– The story of how a monkey insulted a turtle by introducing his private parts into the turtle as the latter lay basking in the sun with his mouth open. The turtle caught hold of the monkey and refused to release him. The monkey went for help, and the Bodhisatta, who was an ascetic in a hermitage nearby, saw the monkey carrying the turtle. The Bodhisatta persuaded the turtle to release the monkey.

The story was related in reference to the quarrelsome ministers of the king of Kosala. J.ii.359-61.


Well, in the Jātakas, the stories are just commentaries, not Tipitika. Only the verses are Tipitika. Unfortunately, PTS published them together, so it is not at all clear to the reader.


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