What is the meanig of Paramattha?

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Re: What is the meanig of Paramattha?

Postby mikenz66 » Sat Dec 28, 2013 9:59 am

Hi SarathW,

I'm not clear what exactly on page 184 you are referring to. Perhaps you are working from a version with different page numbers? It might be helpful if you copied the start of the passage you are recommending.

:anjali:
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Re: What is the meanig of Paramattha?

Postby SarathW » Sat Dec 28, 2013 9:27 pm

Hi Mike
The way I understand that, there is no an ultimate unchangeable element of existence.
Everything is subject to dependent origination.
Every thing is subject to impermanence and insubstantiality.

As a human it is enough for us to know that the five aggregate is the ultimate conceivable component of our existence.
With that knowledge we can realise Anatta and make our way to the liberation.

:)
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Re: What is the meanig of Paramattha?

Postby SarathW » Tue Dec 31, 2013 12:57 am

You look at a river and you think the water is always
there. You know that every second there is new water flowing.
There are many similes to demonstrate the ultimate truth and
the conventional truth. These are just some of the similes. For
example, a car, we say that a car is a convention and the parts
are ultimate truth. Of course even the parts are not ultimate
truth yet. If you break it down to the smallest particle, that
particle is the ultimate truth. The smallest particle of matter is
the ultimate truth.

Page 39
http://buddhispano.net/sites/default/fi ... dies-I.pdf
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Re: What is the meanig of Paramattha?

Postby SarathW » Mon Mar 31, 2014 11:55 pm

Good article about this question:

Now the use of the two words, saccikattha and paramattha (" real and ultimate" )
as indicative of the nature of dhammas seems to give the impression that in denying
the reality of the person the Theravadins have overstressed the reality of the
dhammas. Does this amount to the admission that the dhammas are real and
discrete entities existing in their own right? Such a conclusion, it appears to us, is
not tenable.

Page 8:
http://www.stefan.gr/buddhism/books/abh ... theory.pdf
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Re: What is the meanig of Paramattha?

Postby Bakmoon » Fri Apr 04, 2014 7:23 pm

It is a term used in the context of the two truths, and it is the antonym to the term Sammuti, which means conventional.

According to my understanding, ultimate reality is that which is directly experienced, and conventional reality is conceptual. To borrow your example of a house, the ultimate reality is the set of experiences which you have, such as the seeing, hearing, smelling, and touching of the house (you could include taste here, but I don't know of many people who lick their houses).

Based on these experiences which arise and cease, the mind generalizes a concept, in this case the concept of house, and this concept of house doesn't exist as a direct experience, so you can't call it ultimate reality. You can't say categorically there isn't a house however, as the concept of house is based on experience and is consistent with direct experience, so we say that it exists, but in a different sense. That is to say, we say the house exists in a conventional sense.

That's how I understand the distinction between ultimate and conventional reality anyways. There are probably other and more precise definitions out there, but I think this is a good practical way of understanding it.
The non-doing of any evil,
The performance of what's skillful,
The cleansing of one's own mind:
This is the Buddhas' teaching.
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