Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

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Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

Postby Mkoll » Sat Dec 28, 2013 8:33 pm

Herein, friends,

(1) Let a brother have some work to do.
He thinks:
'There's that work I have to do,
but the doing of it will tire me.
Well then, I shall lie down.'
He lies down;
he stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.

(2) Or he has been working, and thinks:
'I have been working,
and the doing of my work has tired me.
Well then, I shall lie down.'
He lies down;
he stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.

(3) Or he has to make a journey,
and he thinks:
'I have to make a journey,
and that will tire me.
Well then, I shall lie down.'
He lies down;
he stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.

(4) Or he has gone on his journey,
and reflects:
'I have gone on a journey,
and that has tired me.
Well then, I shall lie down.'
He lies down;
he stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.

(5) Or he tours about a village or township for alms
and does not obtain his fill
of poor or rich food, and thinks:
'I've gone about village,
about township for alms
and have not obtained my fill
of poor or rich food.
This body of mine is tired and good for naught.
Well then, I'll lie down.'
He lies down;
he stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.

(6) Or he tours about a village or township for alms
and does obtain his fill
of poor or rich food and thinks:
'I've gone about a village or township for alms
and have obtained my fill
of poor or rich food.
This body of me is heavy and good for naught,
it seems to me like a load of soaked beans.
Well then, I'll lie down'
He lies down;
he stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.

(7) Or in him some slight ailment has arisen,
and he thinks:
'In this state it is fit I lie down.'
He lies down;
he stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.

(8) Or he has recovered from illness,
has recently arisen from some indisposition.
And he thinks:
'This body is weak and good for naught.
Well then, I'll lie down.'
He stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.
-DN 33, TW & CAF Rhys Davids, PTS

Whoever hasn't done any of these in a long time deserves serious respect. :bow:

:anjali:
Last edited by Mkoll on Sat Dec 28, 2013 8:36 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Peace,
James
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Eight occasions for making an effort

Postby Mkoll » Sat Dec 28, 2013 8:36 pm

Eight bases of setting afoot an undertaking.

Herein, brethren,
(1) let a brother have some work to do.
He thinks:
'There is that work I have to do,
but in doing it,
I shall not find it easy to attend to the religion of the Buddhas.
Well then, I will stir up energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'

(2) Or he has done a task, and thinks:
'I have been working,
but I could not attend to the religion of the Buddhas.
Well then, I will stir up energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'

(3) Or he has to go on a journey,
and thinks it will not be easy for him, on his way,
to attend to the religion of the Buddhas,
and resolves:
'Well then, I will stir up energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'

(4) Or he has been on a journey,
but has not been able to attend to the religion of the Buddhas,
and resolves:
Well then, I will stir up energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'

(5) Or he has toured about village or township for alms
and has not obtained his fill
of poor or rich food.
And he thinks that,
under the circumstances,
his body is light and fit for work
and resolves:
Well then, I will stir up energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'

(6) Or he has toured and has obtained his fill and thinks that,
under the circumstances,
his body is strong and fit to work
and resolves:
Well then, I will stir up energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'

(7) Or in him some slight ailment has arisen.
And he thinks it is possible that the ailment may grow worse,
so that he must stir up energy
to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'

(8) Or he has recovered from illness,
has recently arisen from some indisposition.
And he thinks:
I have recovered from illness,
I have recently arisen from my indisposition.
It is possible that the illness may recur.
Well then, I will stir up energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.'
-DN 33, TW & CAF Rhys Davids, PTS

:anjali:
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James
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Re: Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

Postby kitztack » Sat Dec 28, 2013 10:30 pm

thanks for the post, it is very inspiring, sums up my laziness very well :toilet:
Aflame with the fire of passion, the fire of aversion, the fire of delusion.
Aflame, with birth, aging & death, with sorrows, lamentations, pains, distresses, & despairs ......

Seeing thus, the disciple of the Noble One grows disenchanted. SN 35.28
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Re: Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

Postby Kim OHara » Sat Dec 28, 2013 10:44 pm

Mkoll wrote:
Herein, friends,

(1) Let a brother have some work to do.
He thinks:
'There's that work I have to do,
but the doing of it will tire me.
Well then, I shall lie down.'
He lies down;


(2) ... 3 ... 4 ... 5 ... 6... 7 ... 8 ...
He stirs up no energy to finish that which is not done,
to accomplish the unaccomplished,
to realize the unrealized.
-DN 33, TW & CAF Rhys Davids, PTS

Whoever hasn't done any of these in a long time deserves serious respect. :bow:

:anjali:

I guess I don't deserve serious respect, then.
:thinking:
Better do something about it!

:namaste:
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Re: Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Sat Dec 28, 2013 11:22 pm

Having read this thread, I think it's time for bed.
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Re: Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

Postby m0rl0ck » Sun Dec 29, 2013 1:56 am

I just got up from a nap. It was great :) I plan on having a nice pot of tea this evening and smoking a bowl of my favorite tobacco and doing as close to nothing constructive as i can get.
"Even if you've read the whole Canon and can remember lots of teachings; even if you can explain them in poignant ways, with lots of people to respect you; even if you build a lot of monastery buildings, or can explain inconstancy, stress, and not-self in the most detailed fashion ... The only thing that serves your own true purpose is release from suffering.

"And you'll be able to gain release from suffering only when you know the one mind."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/thai ... eleft.html
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Re: Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

Postby kmath » Sun Dec 29, 2013 7:20 am

Who would think this??

Mkoll wrote:
Herein, friends,

(1) Let a brother have some work to do.
He thinks:
'There's that work I have to do,
but the doing of it will tire me.
Well then, I shall lie down.'


Makes no sense to me.
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Re: Eight occasions of indolence and of making an effort

Postby binocular » Sun Dec 29, 2013 1:50 pm

kmath wrote:Who would think this??
Herein, friends,

(1) Let a brother have some work to do.
He thinks:
'There's that work I have to do,
but the doing of it will tire me.
Well then, I shall lie down.'

Who would think this? People who become tired at the mere thought of working.
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