Kammaṭṭhāna

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Cittasanto
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Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Cittasanto » Fri Jan 16, 2009 11:25 pm

Can anyone tell me what it is?
where its practice derives from?
everything really!
I have my suspicions and if I am correct it would explain something which happened a while ago!
Blog, Suttas, Aj Chah, Facebook.

He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that. His reasons may be good, and no one may have been able to refute them.
But if he is equally unable to refute the reasons on the opposite side, if he does not so much as know what they are, he has no ground for preferring either opinion …
...
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Individual
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Individual » Fri Jan 16, 2009 11:42 pm

Manapa wrote:Can anyone tell me what it is?
where its practice derives from?
everything really!
I have my suspicions and if I am correct it would explain something which happened a while ago!

It's the forty objects of meditation from the Visuddhimagga, a commentary written by Buddhaghosa. The list is derived from the meditation practices taught by the Buddha. I don't think it's an all-encompassing list, but it's certainly a very nice one.

Wikipedia's article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kammatthana
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cooran
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby cooran » Sun Jan 18, 2009 1:40 am

Hello Manapa, all,

Mahasi Sayadaw taught and explained this technique:

http://www.dhammaweb.net/mahasi/book/Ma ... tation.pdf

metta
Chris
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Element

Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Element » Sun Jan 18, 2009 5:37 am

I may be corrected but I have heard kammatthana means 'object of work'.

Kamma here means 'work' such as in the word 'kammaniyo', which means 'ready for work' or 'active'.

Buddha said one quality of samadhi is it is active or pliant. It is sensitive and flexible for the work of introspection or vipassana.
So evaṃ samāhite citte parisuddhe pariyodāte anaṅgaṇe vigatūpakkilese mudubhūte kammaniye ṭhite āneñjappatte āsavānaṃ khayañāṇāya cittaṃ abhininnāmesiṃ.

When the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of defilement, pliant, malleable, steady & attained to imperturbability, I directed it to the knowledge of the ending of the mental fermentations.

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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby bodom » Sun Jan 18, 2009 1:44 pm

Element wrote:I may be corrected but I have heard kammatthana means 'object of work'.

Kamma here means 'work' such as in the word 'kammaniyo', which means 'ready for work' or 'active'.

Buddha said one quality of samadhi is it is active or pliant. It is sensitive and flexible for the work of introspection or vipassana.
So evaṃ samāhite citte parisuddhe pariyodāte anaṅgaṇe vigatūpakkilese mudubhūte kammaniye ṭhite āneñjappatte āsavānaṃ khayañāṇāya cittaṃ abhininnāmesiṃ.

When the mind was thus concentrated, purified, bright, unblemished, rid of defilement, pliant, malleable, steady & attained to imperturbability, I directed it to the knowledge of the ending of the mental fermentations.


In Buddhism, kammaṭṭhāna is a Pali word (Sanskrit: karmasthana) which literally means the place of work. Figuratively it means the place within the mind where one goes in order to work on spiritual development. More concretely, it refers to the forty canonical objects of meditation (samatha kammaṭṭhāna), listed in the third chapter of the Visuddhimagga.[1]

Buddhaghosa & Nanamoli (1999), p. 90.

:namaste:
To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

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Element

Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby Element » Sun Jan 18, 2009 8:02 pm

bodom_bad_boy wrote:In Buddhism, kammaṭṭhāna is a Pali word (Sanskrit: karmasthana) which literally means the place of work. Figuratively it means the place within the mind where one goes in order to work on spiritual development.

Thank you. :smile:

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bodom
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby bodom » Thu Jan 22, 2009 4:09 pm

To study is to know the texts,
To practice is to know your defilements,
To attain the goal is to know and let go.

- Ajahn Lee Dhammadharo

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suriyopama
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby suriyopama » Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:32 am

This is a very old post, but I hope that talking about Kammaṭṭhāna would not be considered necroposting :smile:

I've found this:

Kammatthana (Part1)

The word “Kammaṭṭhāna” is a technical term, and it is given a special significance in the way of Dhamma as practiced by those who are Dhutanga Bhikkhus. The true basis of kammaṭṭhāna however, is to be found in everyone — in men, women, those who are ordained and lay people, for it refers to such things as hair of the head, hair of the body, and the rest.

The word “kammaṭṭhāna” has been well known among Buddhists for a long time and the accepted meaning is: “the place of work (or basis of work).” But the “work” here is a very important work and means the work of demolishing the world of birth (bhava); thus, demolishing (future) births, kilesas, taṇhā, and the removal and destruction of all avijjā from our hearts. All this is in order that we may be free from dukkha. In other words, free from birth, old age, pain and death, for these are the bridges that link us to the round of saṁsāra (vaṭṭa), which is never easy for any beings to go beyond and be free. This is the meaning of “work” in this context rather than any other meaning, such as work as is usually done in the world. The result that comes from putting this work into practice, even before reaching the final goal, is happiness in the present and in future lives. Therefore those Bhikkhus who are interested and who practice these ways of Dhamma are usually known as Dhutanga Kammaṭṭhāna Bhikkhus, the way of practice of Dhutanga Kammaṭṭhāna as derived from Venerable Ajahn Mun (Bhūridatta Thera).

A form of kammaṭṭhāna which has been very important since the time of the Buddha, and is taught by the Upajjhāya (Preceptor) at the time of ordination, consists of five parts of the body: “Kesa — hair of the head; Loma — hair of the body; Nakhā — nails; Dantā — teeth; Taco — skin” in both forward and reverse order. These are taught so that the one who has been ordained should grasp them as a method of contemplation, going back and forth over them, time after time until skill is gained and one of them, or all five, are known thoroughly. For these five are important parts of the bodies of all men and women.

But that which is called the “kammaṭṭhāna”, which is the “supporting object” (ārammaṇa) of any particular citta, is of many kinds, and according to the texts, which can be consulted by those who are interested, there are forty such objects. The main reason why there are so many different kinds of kammaṭṭhāna is to allow those who are interested in practicing to choose one or more which are suitable to their characters, for the characteristics of people differ. This is similar to diseases, which are of many kinds and therefore require different medicines to treat them.

The method is to take up one of those objects and to repeat its name (parikamma–bhāvanā) in any bodily position that is suitable or appropriate. For example, repeating, Kesa… Kesa… Kesa… Kesa..., or Loma… Loma… Loma… Loma..., having mindfulness to maintain constant control, and not letting the heart wander elsewhere, while being aware of the particular Dhamma object, the name of which one is repeating, and not frequently changing about between several Dhamma objects — which is characteristic of one who is halfhearted and desultory. One should continue in this way until either truly experiencing the results or truly knowing that the object does not suit one’s character, before changing to a new object.

One who truly knows that a particular object suits his character should take hold of it as the heart’s guide and continue to persevere without weakening until he experiences the results more and more and goes forward into the ground of Dhamma where it becomes necessary for him to change the object of Dhamma — which he will know for himself.

The result that comes from practicing with these or any other kinds of Dhamma that suit one’s character, is an increasing happiness and calm within the heart which one has never experienced before. This calmness of heart begins at the lowest level, which is the attainment of calm for only a few moments. Then it increases to a moderate duration, and finally to a state of calm for as long as one wants to rest, and to withdraw from it as one wishes. This last state of calm is much more subtle, deep and intimate than the others.

While the citta is calm it can let go of all those emotional disturbances which normally trouble it in various ways and then there remains only the “knowing” and “brightness” which are innate qualities of the heart, as well as happiness which arises from the calm, and accords with the level of the heart. There is nothing else there, because at this moment the citta is without any objective support (ārammaṇa) and it is its own self and alone. Even if there are subtle kinds of kilesas within it they do not show themselves, for it is like still, clear, unclouded water in which any remaining sediment has settled to the bottom and does not make the water muddy, so that it is clear and clean and fit to be used for drinking, washing or anything else.

The heart which is without any objective support is peaceful in itself and for however long it stays alone it will be happy, wonderful, meaningful and of great value causing “the owner” to admire it long and much while it remains in that state. In that it is both meaningful and wonderful it never becomes insipid even long afterwards. This is because the heart which is profound and wonderful is already within oneself, so that when it is cleansed and one goes inside and truly reaches it even for only a moment, it immediately shows one by direct experience how wonderful it is. But if one lets it go, letting it slip out of one’s hands, and it deteriorates due to not truly going back to the method of practice or trying to develop it further, it will cause one to long for it and to feel very upset that one cannot get back to that state of the citta. It is probably for this reason, that at the time of the Buddha, the heart of one of the Sāvakas developed and deteriorated up to six times, until he became very disappointed and sorry because of his longing. But finally he became one of the Sāvaka Arahants because exertion and striving acted as a bridge that made the link, enabling him to penetrate and reach the Deathless (Amata) Dhamma — which is the realm of happiness. This he did by relying upon the Kammaṭṭhāna Dhamma as the way to go forward.
(Venerable Ajahn Mahā Boowa, “Patipadā (Venerable Ãcariya Mun’s Path of Practice)”)

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suriyopama
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Re: Kammaṭṭhāna

Postby suriyopama » Sat Apr 02, 2016 10:33 am

Kammatthana (Part2)

Of the countless Buddhas and Sāvaka Arahants of each Buddha who have attained Parinibbāna throughout the immeasurable past, including those of the Lord Buddha, the Samaṇa Gotama and his Sāvakas who passed on a few thousand years ago, all of them did so and arose up to the state of Buddha and the state of Arahant by using one or more of the kammaṭṭhānas — such as the five Kammaṭṭhānas. Not even one of them realised Dhamma without a kammaṭṭhāna, so one may reasonably claim that kammaṭṭhāna is the birthplace of all the Exalted Ones. This is because, before it is possible for the rūpa and nāma of a Bhikkhu or a lay person to develop and metamorphose from the state of an ordinary person (puthujjana) into that of a Noble person (Ariya puggala) from the lowest to the highest level, he must have a Kammaṭṭhāna Dhamma as the device that will “wash him clean”, and the device that will in various ways, process and alter his thinking and understanding that are the background of his citta which has the “seeds” of vaṭṭa embedded within it, and will scatter them so that they disperse and disappear entirely. Then it will alter and become the “Buddha–heart” and an entirely new sphere of heart arises in complete purity.

Therefore, all of the Buddhas have upheld the kammaṭṭhāna as a vitally important and essential Dhamma, and every one of the “World Teachers” (Sāsadā) have always praised it highly in the circle of those who followed their religion right up to the present era. This is also the case in the religion of our Samaṇa Gotama who upheld the kammaṭṭhāna as the pattern and the ancient unchanging tradition to be followed, and he was the first and the foremost and he became the Lord Buddha because of the forty Kammaṭṭhānas, of which ānāpānasati is an example. The Lord Buddha also taught these kammaṭṭhānas to his followers and they have come down to us in the present age, and they still act as a bridge, linking beings in the world right up to Nibbāna — and they will continue to do so until the end is reached of the power of the inherent good characteristics (vāsanā) of those who follow the Lord. For these reasons the term “kammaṭṭhāna” has always been a special form of Dhamma within the circle of the Sāsana, and it will always be so.

Someone who has faith in Buddhism but has not yet cultivated and practiced the way of kammaṭṭhāna, yet knows something about the hidden things which are within himself, both good and bad, should not just think how clever he is in his self-knowledge, even if he can remember everything which he has read out of the Ti–Piṭaka. Because the Ti–Piṭaka is only a balance sheet of the good and evil of those things, or natural phenomena, which are within oneself and it remains like this until it has been recognised by a form of practice in which the kammaṭṭhāna clearly shows up the way leading to the truth in accordance with the intention of the Lord in revealing Dhamma and teaching the world.

These forty aspects of kammaṭṭhāna are the cupboard where the Ti–Piṭaka is kept. They are the means for the destruction of becoming and birth. They are the tools for destroying the “rotating wheel” (cakka) that leads worldly beings whirling around through birth and death until they neither know their old and new lives, nor their old and new dukkha which is all mixed up with these lives, all of which they cut off completely.

Doing a form of practice which is without any of these Dhammas in any way, to give support and help to it will not lead to the destruction of the kilesas and the mass of Dukkha which are within one, nor will it reduce them, ameliorate them and eradicate them at all. But a practice which has these Dhammas to give some aid and support to it can certainly destroy the mass of Dukkha entirely.

For this reason, one who practices for calm and happiness and for knowing clearly and penetrating into all Dhammas must take hold of these Kammaṭṭhāna Dhammas as the life-line of his practice all the way through from the lowest to the highest level of Dhamma, this being the freedom (vimutti) of Nibbāna. Whoever does the practice to develop virtue in a good and true manner and by whatever method, when he reaches a truly decisive situation — in other words, when he is taking a step up from a lower to a higher ground or level of citta and Dhamma — he will have to turn back and take up one or other of these Kammaṭṭhāna Dhammas as the means of going on, so that he will be able to pass through and go beyond with ease and safety. Because these Dhammas are where all the Dhamma Truths (Sacca Dhamma), which have Path, Fruition and Nibbāna as their topmost point, are drawn together. All these Dhammas are within the sphere of the Buddha Sāsana, and all the Great Teachers (Sāsadā) of each era have been the first to reveal and teach them, each in the same manner, after which they were handed down successively from teacher to pupil.

Those who are still doubtful of the Buddhas, each of whom revealed and taught Dhamma in the various ages, until we come to the present Great Teacher who is our Lord Buddha, should practice and investigate by the way of the Dhamma of kammaṭṭhāna, which he also demonstrated, proving it truly by the ways of wisdom until the results arose as he had intended. Then one will know from the knowledge and experience that arises from one’s own practice with complete clarity that the Great Teacher and Dhamma are not different but are one and the same thing. Which accords with the essence of Dhamma that the Lord revealed in brief, thus:

“Whoever sees Dhamma sees the Tathāgata.”

The Dhamma in this saying proclaims all the Tathāgatas very clearly and lets us know that the Tathāgatas always dwell in Dhamma and are not dependent on time and place. For even though each of the Buddhas entered Parinibbāna long ago, as understood in the conventions of the world, the truth in fact is that the Tathāgata is just this Dhamma.

All those who have seen Dhamma within the heart with clarity and certainty have no doubts regarding the Tathāgatas at all — and what state the Tathāgatas dwell in. For although the world understands that once they have entered Nibbāna they all disappear into silence and the Great Teacher is no longer there to teach with mettā. The truth is that the Dhamma which the Lord bestowed and which causes Enlightenment to arise in his followers is in fact our Great Teacher.

If one has enough interest to want to have the Great Teacher within one’s heart, it can be there at all times, just as if the Lord Buddha was still living. It only depends on the extent to which one is wholehearted in one’s respect and reverence and pays heed to Dhamma which represents the Lord, and to what extent one rates it as more important than other things. For even if the Lord were still alive it would be of no help to one at all if one took no interest in it, and one would still be just as lost as one was before without gaining anything.

So as not to cause regret and remorse to oneself in the future, and to bring contentment of heart both in the present and the future, one should practice and develop oneself by way of the Dhamma that was bestowed on us by the Lord Buddha as his inheritance and which stands in place of him. The results will be the same in all respects, as if the Lord Buddha was still living and there will be no difference in it at all. In other words one will have Dhamma, which is the Great Teacher in one’s heart constantly at all times.
(Venerable Ajahn Mahā Boowa, “Patipadā (Venerable Ãcariya Mun’s Path of Practice)”)


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