list of all theravada monk vows

Discussion of ordination, the Vinaya and monastic life. How and where to ordain? Bhikkhuni ordination etc.

list of all theravada monk vows

Postby konchokzopa » Mon Mar 17, 2014 8:44 pm

where can i find a list of all the vows that a theravada monk is to uphold?
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Re: list of all theravada monk vows

Postby David N. Snyder » Mon Mar 17, 2014 8:54 pm

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Re: list of all theravada monk vows

Postby culaavuso » Mon Mar 17, 2014 8:55 pm

The Buddhist Monastic Code is a good reference with the full set of vows and details about how they are interpreted according to the commentarial tradition.

There's also this List of the 227 rules that is easier to read for a quick overview but does not have as much detail about interpretation and subtleties.
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Re: list of all theravada monk vows

Postby Doshin » Tue Mar 18, 2014 9:19 am

culaavuso wrote:The Buddhist Monastic Code is a good reference with the full set of vows and details about how they are interpreted according to the commentarial tradition.
...


Your (deep) link is only to Volume I. A better link would be, where you can see what you download, and notice Volume II:
http://www.accesstoinsight.org/lib/auth ... saro/#bmc1

AFAIK, ATI is "frozen", and the two files on ATI is not the last update. Newer version is available on http://www.dhammatalks.org/ebook_index.html#bmc where you can get a epub or mobi format/versions as well.

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Re: list of all theravada monk vows

Postby happylotus1 » Mon Apr 28, 2014 2:47 pm

4 parajikas (defeats)

The four parajikas (defeats) are rules entailing expulsion from the monastic Order (Sangha) for life. If a monk or nun breaks any one of the rules he/she is automatically 'defeated' in the holy life and falls from monkhood immediately. He is not allowed to become a monk again in his/her lifetime. Intention is necessary in all these four cases to constitute an offence. The four parajikas for bhikkus are:
1. Sexual intercourse, that is, any voluntary sexual interaction between a bhikkhu or bhikkhuni and a living being.
2. Stealing, that is, the robbery of anything worth more than 1/24 troy ounce of gold (as determined by local law).
3. Intentionally bringing about the death of a human being, even if it is still an embryo — whether by killing the person, arranging for an assassin to kill the person, inciting the person to die, or describing the advantages of death.
4. Deliberately lying to another person that one has attained a superior spiritual state, such as claiming to be an Arahant when one knows one is not, or claiming to have attained one of the jhanas when one knows one hasn't.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)

13 sanghadisesas (rules requiring a meeting)

13 sanghadisesas are rules requiring an initial and subsequent meeting of the Sangha (communal meetings). If the monk breaks any rule here he has to undergo a period of probation or displine after which, if he shows himself to be repentant, he may be reinstated by a Sangha of not less than twenty monks. Like the parajikas, the sanghadisesas can only come about through the monk's own intention and cannot be accidentally invoked. The thirteen sanghadisesas are:
1. Discharge of semen, except while dreaming, or getting someone to discharge your semen.
2. Lustful bodily contact with a woman, including kissing or holding hands.
3. Making lustful remarks to a woman alluding to her genitals or sexual intercourse.
4. Requesting sexual favors from a woman, or telling her that she would benefit (i.e., spiritually) from having sex with the monk.
5. Arranging for a date, affair, or marriage between a man and woman.
6. Building a hut without permission from the Sangha, or building a hut that exceed 3 x 1.75 meters in size.
7. Having someone else build a hut for you without permission from the Sangha, or exceeding 3 x 1.75 meters in size.
8. Making unfounded charges about another bhikkhu in the hopes of having him disrobed.
9. Making deceitfully worded charges about another bhikkhu in the hopes of having him disrobed.
10. Agitating for a schism, even after having been rebuked three times.
11. Supporting an agitator, even after he was rebuked three times. (This only applies if there are fewer than four supporters.)
12. Rejecting well-grounded criticism, even after having been rebuked three times.
13. Criticizing the justice of one's own banishment, even after having been rebuked three times.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)

30 nissaggiya pacittiya (confession with forfeiture)

30 nissaggiya pacittiya (confession with forfeiture):
30 nissaggiya pacittiya are rules entailing "confession with forfeiture." They are mostly concerned with the possessing of items which are disallowed or obtained in disallowable ways. The monk has to forfeit the item and then confess his offence to another monk. The thirty nissaggiya pacittiya for bhikku are:
1. Keeping an extra robe for more than ten days after receiving a new one.
2. Sleeping in a separate place from any of his three robes.
3. Keeping an out-of-season robe for more than thirty days when one has expectation for a new robe.
4. Getting an unrelated bhikkuni to wash your robes for you.
5. Accepting robes from a bhikkuni as a gift.
6. Accepting robes from the laity, except when one's own robes have been destroyed, or one is asking for the sake of another bhikku.
7. Accepting too many robes from the laity when one's own robes have been destroyed.
8. Accepting a robe from a lay person after telling them that their robe is too cheap for you.
9. Accepting a robe from the laity after asking two or more of them to pool their funds in order to buy a nicer robe.
10. Accepting a robe after coming to the treasurer to get the robe more than six times (since this indicates an excess of desire).
11. Owning a blanket or rug made of silk.
12. Making or accepting a blanket or rug made from pure black wool.
13. Making or accepting a blanket or rug made from more than 50% black wool.
14. Making or accepting a blanket or rug fewer than six years after you last made or accepted one.
15. Making or accepting a sitting rug without incorporating at least one old piece of felt 25 cm. square, for the sake of discoloring it.
16. Carrying raw wool for more than 48 km.
17. Getting a bhikkuni to wash, dye, or card raw wool.
18. Accepting gold or money, or telling someone how to donate it. If money is placed in a bhikku's presence he may not recognize it as his nor tell someone else to take care of it for him. Bhikkus often have stewards who will take care of donations, but the stewards are always free to take the money and leave.
19. Buying or selling goods.
20. Trading goods with anyone besides other bhikkus.
21. Keeping an extra alms bowl for more than ten days after receiving a new one.
22. Asking for a new bowl when your old bowl is not beyond repair.
23. Taking a medicine from storage for more than seven days.
24. Using a rains-bathing cloth before the last two weeks of the fourth month of the hot season, or accepting one before the fourth month.
25. Taking back a loaned robe out of anger.
26. Getting thread, and getting people to weave thread for you.
27. Receiving cloth after telling its weavers to increase the quality for you.
28. Keeping robes past the end of the season after accepting them during the last eleven days of the Rains Retreat, (Vassa).
29. Being separated from your robes for more than six nights if you are living in a dangerously distant village and need to separate yourself from your robes after the Rains Retreat.
30. Persuading a donor to give gifts to oneself, when they were previously intended for the sangha at large.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)


92 pacittiya (rules entailing confession)

92 pacittiya are rules entailing confession. There are ninety two Pacittiya and they are minor violations which do not entail expulsion or any probationary periods.
1. A deliberate lie is to be confessed.
2. An insult is to be confessed.
3. Malicious tale-bearing among bhikkhus is to be confessed.
4. Should any bhikkhu have an unordained person recite Dhamma line by line (with him), it is to be confessed.
5. Should any bhikkhu lie down together (in the same dwelling) with an unordained person for more than two or three consecutive nights, it is to be confessed.
6. Should any bhikkhu lie down together (in the same dwelling) with a woman, it is to be confessed.
7. Should any bhikkhu teach more than five or six sentences of Dhamma to a woman, unless a knowledgeable man is present, it is to be confessed.
8. Should any bhikkhu report (his own) superior human state, when it is factual, to an unordained person, it is to be confessed.
9. Should any bhikkhu report (another) bhikkhu's serious offense to an unordained person, unless authorized by the bhikkhus, it is to be confessed.
10. Should any bhikkhu dig soil or have it dug, it is to be confessed.
11. The damaging of a living plant is to be confessed.
12. Evasive speech and causing frustration are to be confessed.
13. Criticizing or complaining (about a Community official) is to be confessed.
14. Should any bhikkhu set a bed, bench, mattress, or stool belonging to the Community out in the open, or have it set out, and then on departing neither put it away nor have it put away, or should he go without taking leave, it is to be confessed.
15. Should any bhikkhu set out bedding in a dwelling belonging to the Community, or have it set out, and then on departing neither put it away nor have it put away, or should he go without taking leave, it is to be confessed.
16. Should any bhikkhu knowingly lie down in a dwelling belonging to the Community so as to intrude on a bhikkhu who arrived there first, (thinking), "Whoever finds it confining will go away," doing it for just that reason and no other, it is to be confessed.
17. Should any bhikkhu, angered and displeased, evict a bhikkhu from a dwelling belonging to the Community, or have him evicted, it is to be confessed.
18. Should any bhikkhu sit or lie down on a bed or bench with detachable legs on an (unplanked) loft in a dwelling belonging to the Community, it is to be confessed.
19. When a bhikkhu is having a large dwelling built, he may supervise two or three layers of facing to plaster the area around the window frame and reinforce the area around the door frame the width of the door opening, while standing where there are no crops to speak of. Should he supervise more than that, even if standing where there are no crops to speak of, it is to be confessed.
20. Should any bhikkhu knowingly pour water containing living beings, or have it poured, on grass or on clay, it is to be confessed.
21. Should any bhikkhu, unauthorized, exhort the bhikkhunīs, it is to be confessed.
22. Should any bhikkhu, even if authorized, exhort the bhikkhunīs after sunset, it is to be confessed.
23. Should any bhikkhu, having gone to the bhikkhunīs' quarters, exhort the bhikkhunīs, except at the proper occasion, it is to be confessed. Here the proper occasion is this: A bhikkhunī is ill. This is the proper occasion here.
24. Should any bhikkhu say that the bhikkhus exhort the bhikkhunīs for the sake of worldly gain, it is to be confessed.
25. Should any bhikkhu give robe-cloth to a bhikkhunī unrelated to him, except in exchange, it is to be confessed.
26. Should any bhikkhu sew robe-cloth or have it sewn for a bhikkhunī unrelated to him, it is to be confessed.
27. Should any bhikkhu, by arrangement, travel together with a bhikkhunī even for the interval between one village and the next, except at the proper occasion, it is to be confessed. Here the proper occasion is this: The road is to be traveled by caravan and is considered dubious and risky. This is the proper occasion here.
28. Should any bhikkhu, by arrangement, get in the same boat with a bhikkhunī going upstream or downstream, except to cross over to the other bank, it is to be confessed.
29. Should any bhikkhu knowingly eat almsfood donated through the prompting of a bhikkhunī, except for food that householders had already intended for him prior (to her prompting), it is to be confessed.
30. Should any bhikkhu sit in private, alone with a bhikkhunī, it is to be confessed.
31. A bhikkhu who is not ill may eat one meal at a public alms center. Should he eat more than that, it is to be confessed.
32. A group meal, except on the proper occasions, is to be confessed. Here the proper occasions are these: a time of illness, a time of giving cloth, a time of making robes, a time of going on a journey, a time of embarking on a boat, an extraordinary occasion, a time when the meal is supplied by contemplatives. These are the proper occasions here.
33. An out-of-turn meal, except on the proper occasions, is to be confessed. Here the proper occasions are these: a time of illness, a time of giving cloth (the robe season), a time of making robes. These are the proper occasions here.
34. In case a bhikkhu arriving at a family residence is presented with cakes or cooked grain-meal, he may accept two or three bowlfuls if he so desires. If he should accept more than that, it is to be confessed. Having accepted the two-or-three bowlfuls and having taken them from there, he is to share them among the bhikkhus. This is the proper course here.
35. Should any bhikkhu, having eaten and turned down an offer (of further food), chew or consume staple or non-staple food that is not left over, it is to be confessed.
36. Should any bhikkhu, knowingly and wishing to find fault, present staple or non-staple food to a bhikkhu who has eaten and turned down an offer (for further food), saying, "Here, bhikkhu, chew or consume this" — when it has been eaten, it is to be confessed.
37. Should any bhikkhu chew or consume staple or non-staple food at the wrong time, it is to be confessed.
38. Should any bhikkhu chew or consume stored-up staple or non-staple food, it is to be confessed.
39. There are these finer staple foods, i.e., ghee, fresh butter, oil, honey, sugar/molasses, fish, meat, milk, and curds. Should any bhikkhu who is not ill, having asked for finer staple foods such as these for his own sake, then eat them, it is to be confessed.
40. Should any bhikkhu take into his mouth an edible that has not been given, except for water and tooth-cleaning sticks, it is to be confessed.
41. Should any bhikkhu give staple or non-staple food with his own hand to a naked ascetic, a male wanderer, or a female wanderer, it is to be confessed.
42. Should any bhikkhu say to a bhikkhu, "Come, my friend, let's enter the village or town for alms," and then — whether or not he has had (food) given to him — dismiss him, saying, "Go away, my friend. I don't like sitting or talking with you. I prefer sitting or talking alone," if doing it for that reason and no other, it is to be confessed.
43. Should a bhikkhu sit intruding on a family "with its meal," it is to be confessed.
44. Should any bhikkhu sit in private on a secluded seat with a woman, it is to be confessed.
45. Should any bhikkhu sit in private, alone with a woman, it is to be confessed.
46. Should any bhikkhu, being invited for a meal and without taking leave of an available bhikkhu, go calling on families before or after the meal, except at the proper times, it is to be confessed. Here the proper times are these: the time of giving cloth, the time of making robes. These are the proper times here.
47. A bhikkhu who is not ill may accept (make use of) a four month invitation to ask for requisites. If he should accept (make use of) it for longer than that; unless the invitation is renewed or is permanent; it is to be confessed.
48. Should any bhikkhu go to see an army on active duty, unless there is a suitable reason, it is to be confessed.
49. There being some reason or another for a bhikkhu to go to an army, he may stay two or three (consecutive) nights with the army. If he should stay longer than that, it is to be confessed.
50. If a bhikkhu staying two or three nights with an army should go to a battlefield, a roll call, the troops in battle formation, or to see a review of the (battle) units, it is to be confessed.
51. The drinking of alcohol or fermented liquor is to be confessed.
52. Tickling with the fingers is to be confessed.
53. The act of playing in the water is to be confessed.
54. Disrespect is to be confessed.
55. Should any bhikkhu try to frighten another bhikkhu, it is to be confessed.
56. Should any bhikkhu who is not ill, seeking to warm himself, kindle a fire or have one kindled, unless there is a suitable reason, it is to be confessed.
57. Should any bhikkhu bathe at intervals of less than half a month, except at the proper occasions, it is to be confessed. Here the proper occasions are these: the last month and a half of the hot season, the first month of the rains, these two and a half months being a time of heat, a time of fever; (also) a time of illness; a time of work; a time of going on a journey; a time of wind or rain. These are the proper times here.
58. When a bhikkhu receives a new robe, any one of three means of discoloring it is to be applied: green, brown, or black. If a bhikkhu should make use of a new robe without applying any of the three means of discoloring it, it is to be confessed.
59. Should any bhikkhu, himself having placed robe-cloth under shared ownership (vikappana) with a bhikkhu, a bhikkhuni, a female probationer, a male novice, or a female novice, then make use of the cloth without the shared ownership's being rescinded, it is to be confessed.
60. Should any bhikkhu hide (another) bhikkhu's bowl, robe, sitting cloth, needle case, or belt, or have it hidden, even as a joke, it is to be confessed.
61. Should any bhikkhu knowingly deprive an animal of life, it is to be confessed.
62. Should any bhikkhu knowingly make use of water with living beings in it, it is to be confessed.
63. Should any bhikkhu knowingly agitate for the reviving of an issue that has been rightfully dealt with, it is to be confessed.
64. Should any bhikkhu knowingly conceal another bhikkhu's serious offense, it is to be confessed.
65. Should any bhikkhu knowingly give full ordination to an individual less than twenty years of age, the individual is not ordained and the bhikkhus are blameworthy; and as for him (the preceptor), it is to be confessed.
66. Should any bhikkhu knowingly and by arrangement travel together with a caravan of thieves, even for the interval between one village and the next, it is to be confessed.
67. Should any bhikkhu, by arrangement, travel together with a woman, even for the interval between one village and the next, it is to be confessed.
68. Should any bhikkhu say the following: "As I understand the Dhamma taught by the Blessed One, those acts the Blessed One says are obstructive, when indulged in are not genuine obstructions," the bhikkhus should admonish him thus: "Do not say that, venerable sir. Do not misrepresent the Blessed One, for it is not good to misrepresent the Blessed One. The Blessed One would not say anything like that. In many ways, friend, the Blessed One has described obstructive acts, and when indulged in they are genuine obstructions."
And should the bhikkhu, thus admonished by the bhikkhus, persist as before, the bhikkhus are to rebuke him up to three times so as to desist. If while being rebuked up to three times he desists, that is good. If he does not desist, it is to be confessed.
69. Should any bhikkhu knowingly consort, join in communion, or lie down in the same lodging with a bhikkhu professing such a view who has not acted in compliance with the rule, who has not abandoned that view, it is to be confessed.
70. And if a novice should say the following: "As I understand the Dhamma taught by the Blessed One, those acts the Blessed One says are obstructive when indulged in, are not genuine obstructions," the bhikkhus should admonish him thus: "Do not say that, friend novice. Do not misrepresent the Blessed One, for it is not good to misrepresent the Blessed One. The Blessed One would not say anything like that. In many ways, friend, the Blessed One has described obstructive acts, and when indulged in they are genuine obstructions."
And should that novice, thus admonished by the bhikkhus, persist as before, the bhikkhus should admonish him as follows: "From this day forth, friend novice, you are not to claim the Blessed One as your teacher, nor are you even to have the opportunity the other novices get — that of sharing lodgings two or three nights with the bhikkhus. Away with you! Out of our sight! (literally, 'Get lost!')"
Should any bhikkhu knowingly support, receive services from, consort with, or lie down in the same lodging with a novice thus expelled, it is to be confessed.
71. Should any bhikkhu, admonished by the bhikkhus in accordance with a rule, say, "Friends, I will not train myself under this training rule until I have put questions about it to another bhikkhu, experienced and learned in the discipline," it is to be confessed. Bhikkhus, (a training rule) is to be understood, is to be asked about, is to be pondered. This is the proper course here.
72. Should any bhikkhu, when the Patimokkha is being repeated, say, "Why are these lesser and minor training rules repeated when they lead only to anxiety, bother and confusion?" the criticism of the training rules is to be confessed.
73. Should any bhikkhu, when the Patimokkha is being recited every half-month, say, "Just now have I heard that this case, too, is handed down in the Patimokkha, is included in the Patimokkha, and comes up for recitation every half-month;" and if other bhikkhus should know, "That bhikkhu has already sat through two or three recitations of the Patimokkha, if not more," the bhikkhu is not exempted for being ignorant. Whatever the offense he has committed, he is to be dealt with in accordance with the rule; and in addition, his deception is to be exposed: "It is no gain for you, friend, it is ill-done, that when the Patimokkha is being recited, you do not pay proper attention and take it to heart." Here the deception is to be confessed.
74. Should any bhikkhu, angered and displeased, give a blow to (another) bhikkhu, it is to be confessed.
75. Should any bhikkhu, angered and displeased, raise his hand against (another) bhikkhu, it is to be confessed.
76. Should any bhikkhu charge a bhikkhu with an unfounded sanghadisesa (offense), it is to be confessed.
77. Should any bhikkhu purposefully provoke anxiety in (another) bhikkhu, (thinking,) "This way, even for just a moment, he will have no peace," if doing it for just this reason and no other, it is to be confessed.
78. Should any bhikkhu stand eavesdropping on bhikkhus when they are arguing, quarreling, and disputing, thinking, "I will overhear what they say" if doing it for just this reason and no other, it is to be confessed.
79. Should any bhikkhu, having given consent (by proxy) to a formal act carried out in accordance with the rule, later complain (about the act), it is to be confessed.
80. Should any bhikkhu, when deliberation is being carried on in the Community, get up from his seat and leave without having given consent, it is to be confessed.
81. Should any bhikkhu, (acting as part of) a Community in concord, give robe-cloth (to an individual bhikkhu) and later complain, "The bhikkhus apportion the Community's gains according to friendship," it is to be confessed.
82. Should any bhikkhu knowingly divert to an individual gains that had been allocated for the Community, it is to be confessed.
83. Should any bhikkhu, without being previously announced, cross the threshold of a consecrated noble king's (sleeping chamber) from which the king has not left, from which the treasure (the queen) has not withdrawn, it is to be confessed.
84. Should any bhikkhu pick up or have (someone) pick up a valuable or what is considered a valuable, except within a monastery or within a dwelling, it is to be confessed. But when a bhikkhu has picked up or had (someone) pick up a valuable or what is considered a valuable (left) in a monastery or in a dwelling, he is to keep it, (thinking,) "Whoever it belongs to will (come and) fetch it." This is the proper course here.
85. Should any bhikkhu, without taking leave of an available bhikkhu, enter a village at the wrong time, unless there is a suitable emergency, it is to be confessed.
86. Should any bhikkhu have a needle case made of bone, ivory, or horn, it is to be broken and confessed.
87. When a bhikkhu is making a new bed or bench, it is to have legs (at most) eight fingerbreadths long, using Sugata fingerbreadths, not counting the lower edge of the frame. In excess of that it is to be cut down and confessed.
88. Should any bhikkhu have a bed or bench upholstered, it (the upholstery) is to be torn off and confessed.
89. When a bhikkhu is making a sitting cloth, it is to be made to the standard measurement. Here the standard is this: two spans, using the Sugata span, in length, 1 1/2 in width, the border a span. In excess of that, it is to be cut down and confessed.
90. When a bhikkhu is making a skin-eruption covering cloth, it is to be made to the standard measurement. Here the standard is this: four spans, using the Sugata span, in length, two spans in width. In excess of that, it is to be cut down and confessed.
91. When a bhikkhu is making a rains-bathing cloth, it is to be made to the standard measurement. Here the standard is this: six spans, using the Sugata span, in length, 2 1/2 in width. In excess of that, it is to be cut down and confessed.
92. Should any bhikkhu have a robe made the size of the Sugata robe or larger, it is to be cut down and confessed. Here, the size of the Sugata robe is this: nine spans, using the Sugata span, in length, six spans in width. This is the size of the Sugata's Sugata robe.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)

4 patidesaniya (verbally acknowledged violations)

Four patidesaniya are (monastic) violations which must be verbally acknowledged:
1. Accepting and eating food from an unrelated bhikkuni.
2. Accepting and eating food after a bhikkuni has instructed the donors on who to give what food, and none of the bhikkus rebuke the bhikkuni.
3. Accepting and eating food from a family that the sangha designates as "in training", that is, preparing to becoming arahants, unless if the monk is sick.
4. Accepting and eating food from a family living in a dangerous location, unless if the monk is sick.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)

2 aniyata (indefinite rules)
From The Dhamma Encyclopedia
The two aniyata (indefinite rules):
The aniyata are two indefinite rules where a monk is accused of having committed an offence with a woman in a screened (enclosed) or private place by a lay person. It is indefinite because the final outcome depends on whether the monk acknowledges the offence. Benefit of the doubt is given to the monk unless there is over-riding evidence. Thus it is not proper for a monk to be alone with a woman, especially in screened or private places.
1. Should any bhikkhu sit in private, alone with a woman on a seat secluded enough to lend itself (to sexual intercourse), so that a female lay follower whose word can be trusted, having seen (them), might describe it as constituting any of three cases, entailing defeat, communal meetings, or confession, then the bhikkhu, acknowledging having sat (there), may be dealt with in line with any of the three cases, entailing defeat, communal meetings, or confession, or he may be dealt with in line with whichever case the female lay follower whose word can be trusted described. This case is indefinite.
2. In case a seat is not sufficiently secluded to lend itself (to sexual intercourse) but sufficiently so to address lewd words to a woman, should any bhikkhu sit in private, alone with a woman on such a seat, so that a female lay follower whose word can be trusted, having seen (them), might describe it as constituting either of two cases, entailing communal meetings or confession, then the bhikkhu, acknowledging having sat (there), may be dealt with in line with either of the two cases, entailing communal meetings or confession, or he may be dealt with in line with whichever case the female lay follower whose word can be trusted described. This case too is indefinite.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)

75 rules of training

75 Rules of training (Sekhiyavatta) for monks and nuns:
In many countries, it is also standard for novice monks (samanera) to follow the Sekhiyavatta rules in addition to the 10 precepts.
1. I will wear the under robe properly.
2. I will wear the upper robe properly.
3. I will cover my body properly when going in inhabited areas.
4. I will cover my body properly when sitting in inhabited areas.
5. I will properly restrain the movements of hands and feet when going in inhabited areas.
6. I will properly restrain the movements of hands and feet when sitting in inhabited areas.
7. I will keep my eyes looking down when going in inhabited areas.
8. I will keep my eyes looking down when sitting in inhabited areas.
9. I will not hitch up my robes when going in inhabited areas.
10. I will not hitch up my robes when sitting in inhabited areas.
11. I will not laugh loudly when going in inhabited areas.
12. I will not laugh loudly when sitting in inhabited areas.
13. I will not speak loudly when going in inhabited areas.
14. I will not speak loudly when sitting in inhabited areas.
15. I will not sway my body about when going in inhabited areas.
16. I will not sway my body about when sitting in inhabited areas.
17. I will not swing my arms about when going in inhabited areas.
18. I will not swing my arms about when sitting in inhabited areas.
19. I will not shake my head about when going in inhabited areas.
20. I will not shake my head about when sitting in inhabited areas.
21. I will not put my arms (akimbo) when going in inhabited areas.
22. I will not put my arms (akimbo) when sitting in inhabited areas.
23. I will not cover my head with a cloth when going in inhabited areas.
24. I will not cover my head with a cloth when sitting in inhabited areas.
25. I will not walk on tiptoe when going in inhabited areas.
26. I will not sit clasping the knees in inhabited areas.
27. I will receive pindapāta (alms round) food attentively.
28. When receiving pindapāta food, I will look only into the bowl.
29. I will receive curries in the right proportion to the rice.
30. I will receive pindapāta food only until it reached the rim of the bowl.
31. I will eat pindapāta food attentively.
32. When eating pindapāta food, I will look only into the bowl.
33. I will not dig up the rice making it uneven.
34. I will eat curries in the right proportion to the rice.
35. I will not eat rice only working from the top down.
36. I will not cover up curries; or curry mixed with rice; with white rice because of a desire to get a lot.
37. When I am not sick, I will not ask for curries or rice for the purpose of eating them myself.
38. I will not look at another's bowl with the idea of finding fault.
39. I will not make up a very large mouthful of food.
40. I will make food up into suitably round mouthfuls.
41. I will not open my mouth until the portion of food has been brought to it.
42. When eating, I will not put my fingers into my mouth.
43. When food is still in my mouth, I will not speak.
44. I will not throw lumps of food into my mouth.
45. I will not eat by biting off mouthfuls of rice.
46. I will not eat stuffing out my cheeks.
47. I will not eat and shake my hand about at the same time.
48. I will not eat scattering grains of rice about so that they fall back into the bowl or elsewhere.
49. I will not eat putting my tongue out.
50. I will not eat making a champing sound.
51. I will not eat (or drink) making a sucking sound.
52. I will not eat licking my hands.
53. I will not eat scraping the bowl.
54. I will not eat licking my lips.
55. I will not take hold of a vessel of water with my hand soiled with food.
56. I will not throw out bowl-washing water which has grains of rice in it in a place where there are houses.
A bhikku should train himself thus: I will not teach Dhamma to someone who is not sick and...
57. who has an umbrella in his hand.
58. who has a wooden stick (club) in his hand.
59. who has a sharp-edged weapon in his hand.
60. who has a weapon in his hand.
61. who is wearing (wooden-soled) sandals.
62. who is wearing shoes.
63. who is in a vehicle.
64. who is on a bed (or couch).
65. who is sitting clasping the knees.
66. who has a head wrapping (turban).
67. whose head is covered.
68. who is sitting on a seat while I am sitting on the ground.
69. who is sitting on a high seat while I am sitting on a low seat.
70. who is sitting while I am standing.
71. who is walking in front of me while I am walking behind him.
72. who is walking on a pathway while I am walking beside the pathway.
A bhikku should train himself thus: If I am not sick...
73. I will not defecate or urinate while standing.
74. I will not defecate, urinate or spit on green vegetation.
75. I will not defecate, urinate or spit into water.
(from the Vinaya Pitaka)

7 rules for settlement

Seven rules for settlement (adhikarana-samatha) of legal processes that concern monks only.
1. When an issue is settled, the verdict should be in the presence of the Sangha, the parties, the Dhamma, and the Vinaya.
2. If the bhikku is innocent, the verdict should be "mindfulness".
3. If the bhikku was or is insane, the verdict should be "past insanity".
4. If the bhikku confesses to the exact allegations, the verdict should be "acting in accordance with what was admitted."
5. If the dispute cannot be unanimously settled, the sangha should take a vote and the verdict should be "acting in accordance with the majority".
6. If the bhikku confesses only after interrogation, the verdict should be "acting in accordance with the accused's further misconduct".
7. If both sides agree that they are not acting the way monks ought to, they can call a full assembly of the sima and confess their mistakes, and the verdict should be "covering over as with grass."

From The Dhamma Encyclopedia(from the Vinaya Pitaka)
A householder or householder's son, hearing the Dhamma, gains conviction in the Tathāgata and reflects: 'Household life is confining, a dusty path. The life gone forth is like the open air. It is not easy living at home to practice the holy life totally perfect, totally pure, like a polished shell. What if I were to shave off my hair & beard, put on the ochre robes, and go forth from the household life into homelessness?
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