Monk and transportations

Discussion of ordination, the Vinaya and monastic life. How and where to ordain? Bhikkhuni ordination etc.

Monk and transportations

Postby Gabriel » Mon Apr 07, 2014 2:58 pm

Is it proper for a monk, who strictly follow the trainings rules, to ask for transportation? Hitch hike, ask for a ride, ask a family member or a stranger to get him a bus ticket, boat ticket or a airplane ticket?
Or if he can only be offered this things without asking?
Of course at the time of Buddha transportation was extravagant, but monk probably took Boats from time to time to spread the Buddha's teachings oversea or in the other side of a river, in non-Buddhist country ...
Now day's many Monk's meditations teachers travel the world, are they wanting and asking things in order to do so or if it's the lay's that ask them to do so and arrange every thing for them, giving them the opportunity outside the Bhikkhu's will?
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby gavesako » Mon Apr 07, 2014 6:11 pm

Such trips will usually be pre-arranged following an invitation to teach somewhere or visit one's family, so they will naturally pay for the tickets. Otherwise the lay stewards of a monastery can buy a ticket for a monk who would like to come and reside there.
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby waterchan » Mon Apr 07, 2014 6:41 pm

I suppose the Vinaya rule which states that a monk may not travel on vehicles unless sick is ignored throughout the Buddhist world?
quidquid Latine dictum sit altum videtur
(Anything in Latin sounds profound.)
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby cooran » Mon Apr 07, 2014 8:19 pm

There are some who follow the traditional way:

http://www.northerndailyleader.com.au/s ... y-highway/

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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby Bhikkhu Pesala » Mon Apr 07, 2014 9:14 pm

I don't see any problem with hitch-hiking, but asking a stranger to buy a ticket would not be allowable. If they see you waiting at the station and ask why, then you can explain that you want to get somewhere, but do not carry money. That is still not asking for anything. The stranger is free to offer to help if they wish to.

Usually, if one wants to go somewhere, the solution is to walk, but I am fortunate in having a free travel pass for the over 60s, so I can go anywhere within London fairly easily, subject to certain time and route restrictions.
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby James the Giant » Tue Apr 08, 2014 1:17 am

Monks can ask their old family... Or was it just parents... Anyway, they can ask them for anything, including transport.
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby SarathW » Tue Apr 08, 2014 1:53 am

I thought you become a monk to leave your family behind. (leave them alone without making a burden for them)
:thinking:
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby James the Giant » Tue Apr 08, 2014 2:14 am

SarathW wrote:I thought you become a monk to leave your family behind. (leave them alone without making a burden for them)
:thinking:

Maybe, but it's a specific exception in the monk's rules. There must be a story behind it, but I don't know.
Then,
saturated with joy,
you will put an end to suffering and stress.
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby Gabriel » Tue Apr 08, 2014 4:02 am

Wow!Thank Cooran for that link. I met peoples in Canada and in the U.S, who lived that way(monk whitout the robes) and travelled whit them like this for some time and tried it by myself afterwards. But it is the first time I hear about one person who do it whit the robes in a none Buddhist country :) This is nice to know that this is possible.
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Re: Monk and transportations

Postby gavesako » Tue Apr 08, 2014 6:21 pm

Monks can even break the rains retreat (vassa) for up to seven days specifically in order to visit an ill relative who is in need. These days that might require flying across the continents.
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