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"Minimalists" sub-traditions - Dhamma Wheel

"Minimalists" sub-traditions

Discussion of ordination, the Vinaya and monastic life. How and where to ordain? Bhikkhuni ordination etc.
kryptos
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2014 1:01 pm

"Minimalists" sub-traditions

Postby kryptos » Thu Apr 10, 2014 8:11 pm

Hello everybody! I've been practicing for some years. For someone seeking ordination, which Theravada sub-traditions are the most "minimalists" and keep the practice very simple as free as possible from cultural influence, ritualism, unnecessary practices, etc? Which groups are recommended in Southeast Asia? Vinaya is important but I avoid places in which the monks follow the Vinaya in an inflexible and hypocritical way by sustaining a false pride (vanity) with regard to the way they "strictly" follow the monastic code of discipline. I know this exists because I already lived as layman in a monastery (very strict) for some time in SE Asia. Any help is welcome! Thanks!

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James the Giant
Posts: 792
Joined: Sat Oct 17, 2009 6:41 am

Re: "Minimalists" sub-traditions

Postby James the Giant » Fri Apr 11, 2014 1:10 am

Which tradition was inflexible or hypocritical? Just so I don't accidentally recommend them, hehe! :tongue:

I've visited some excellent Thai Forest Tradition monasteries that are focussed on the basics, and which put very little importance on rites and rituals and ceremonies.
For example, they had no morning or evening chants, just a short ceremony at food time, informal relations between monks, novices, and the Ajahn.
But, I've also visited stiff, inflexible thai forest tradition monasteries, wheRe vinaya and ritual seem to be the only thing they are interested in.
I recommend just travelling widely and visiting lots of places. I guess the tone of a place is set by the ajahn... His attitude towards what's essential and important ... Good luck finding someone good.

You might have more luck in the west, rather than asia?

Hmm, any specifics...? Sayadaw U Teijania has a monastery meditation centre in Yangon, where everyone is pretty chilled and the emphasis is moreon meditation than anything else. He also ordains people.

Best of luck.
Then,
saturated with joy,
you will put an end to suffering and stress.

kryptos
Posts: 9
Joined: Wed Apr 09, 2014 1:01 pm

Re: "Minimalists" sub-traditions

Postby kryptos » Fri Apr 11, 2014 3:57 pm



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