Healthy recipes

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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Tue Apr 29, 2014 11:46 am

I am extremely fond of Brine-Pickling; that is, using a salt-water solution, instead of vinegar.
It's a means of creating pro-biotics, is extremely healthy, safeguards - and at times, even increases - vitamin content, it's easy, inexpensive oh, and did I mention, delicious...?!

Would you like some recipes?
:namaste:

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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby David N. Snyder » Tue Apr 29, 2014 3:49 pm

TheNoBSBuddhist wrote:Would you like some recipes?


Yes.
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby David N. Snyder » Tue Apr 29, 2014 3:52 pm

Tofu stir fry is probably my all-time favorite dish. You can use various veggies to add, no specific ones required.

http://minimalistbaker.com/tofu-that-ta ... -stir-fry/

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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:19 pm

Mr Snyder that looks so good - I could just pick those chopsticks up right now and eat the lot - very appetising!

Ok, first recipe.
This may sound odd to many of you, but it's utterly delicious:

First you will need an Iceberg lettuce (as they're known in the UK: Here's a picture to avoid confusion...)

Image

Remove just one layer of the the outer leaves, (Keep these) and cut the lettuce in half, and remove the two halves of the hard core, in one piece. Keep the cores, but trim off the yellowed dry base.

Cut the lettuce into large bite-sized pieces. (I cut each half into half again, lengthwise, then cut it into 6 pieces, across).

Put into a large bowl, layer by layer, separating the leaves, but not too much..... leave it a bit 'chunky'... Sprinkle each layer with salt, (about 2 teaspoonfuls), and keep mixing and tossing until the lettuces are all salted. Place a small plate on top, but with a good weight to push everything down. Leave the lettuces in the bowl, mixing occasionally with your hands, until the water starts to come out of the lettuce.

When they are fairly wilted, (a couple of hours) pack the lettuce into a clean sterilised jar, pressing down firmly as you go. Add any remaining brine still in the bowl.

You will find the quantity will look very reduced! The juice/brine from the lettuce should rise to about a half inch (1 - 2 cm) above the lettuce.

The lettuce should be submerged. If it is not, add some fresh brine (Ratio: 200ml still mineral water, mixed with 2 teaspoons of salt).

Take a round, unbroken stone and wash it really well. Scrub with soap and bleach, and rinse thoroughly.

Now: Rinse the outer leaves you removed, and fold them up to fit through the neck of the jar. Push them down onto the pressed lettuce leaves. The brine may well rise beyond the folded fresh leaves; that's fine. You want that...

Now, in turn, lay the lettuce hearts down onto the lettuce in the jar. Push the stone on top of the lettuce hearts, until they are also submerged in the brine. Put the lid on. Hopefully, the stone will be proud of the neck/mouth of the jar. This is good, because you need to apply downward pressure.

This squashes everything down.

The lettuce will be ready to eat the same day. Remove the quantity you need, and drain in a sieve, with a weight on top, to remove excess brine. eat as a side dish or as part of a salad.

I'm telling you, it's lush. Crunchy, savoury and definitely different. In Asia and Korea, they prepare a lot of side vegetable dishes this way.

Very late EDIT NOTE:
If the lettuce really is too salty for you, you can rinse it briefly under cold running water, and squeeze the excess fluid out, but carefully, so as not to crush the leaves and break them up... really, it's to remove the water, not crush them into submission.
However, eating this as an accompaniment to other foods which are not as savoury, balances the flavours out....
Last edited by TheNoBSBuddhist on Wed Apr 30, 2014 4:14 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby waterchan » Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:29 pm

No one enjoys an aromatic, healthy dal cooked with fresh cilantro and extra virgin olive oil?

Recipe: http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/14107/lentil+dhal

Substitute olive oil for butter if you wish. Tastes just as good with all the spices.
Last edited by waterchan on Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:31 pm

Please note: because this salting method is so brief, and you can consume the food the same day, ordinary table salt will do.
For most brining/fermenting processes, you need proper pickling or preserving salt if you can; a lot of people use Himalayan Rock salt, which is relatively easy to find (even online) but can be quite expensive.

Usually, ordinary table salt will NOT do: First of all it has either iodine or anti-caking agents, and these actually inhibit fermentation.
Secondly, it's extremely fine; so one cup of pickling salt will yield less salt, weight-wise, than 1 cup of table salt!

For brining larger vegetables, such as carrots, Daikon or dill cucumbers,you need to use de-chlorinated water too. If your tap water has chlorine, you can boil a good quantity for around a quarter of an hour, then leave it to cool and stand overnight. Filter it off the next morning, making sure you hold back any sediment.
If your tap water has ChloraMINE added, you can't get rid of it this way; so you either need special tablets, or you should buy bottled still spring water.

Brining this way is extremely healthy and beneficial. There are loads of youtube videos talking about 'probiotic food preservation' and the health benefits of storing food by brining/fermenting.
:namaste:

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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Tue Apr 29, 2014 4:33 pm

waterchan wrote:No one enjoys an aromatic, healthy dal cooked with fresh cilantro and extra virgin olive oil?


I do... but I use authentic Indian Ghee.....
It's actually quite good for you and much better for you than butter. My cousin is lactose intolerant, but can use ghee quite happily....
:namaste:

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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby Cittasanto » Tue Apr 29, 2014 10:33 pm

TheNoBSBuddhist wrote:
waterchan wrote:No one enjoys an aromatic, healthy dal cooked with fresh cilantro and extra virgin olive oil?


I do... but I use authentic Indian Ghee.....
It's actually quite good for you and much better for you than butter. My cousin is lactose intolerant, but can use ghee quite happily....

does your cousin make the ghee, or buy it? do they use it fine when baking cakes?
My partner is lactose intolerant (well we strongly suspect) so any other tips would be gratefully welcomed.
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Wed Apr 30, 2014 5:54 am

We make our own.

The process is a little long, but worth the effort - and you CAN do other things in the meantime! :popcorn:


You should buy the best quality UNsalted butter possible.
Place as many cakes, sticks or bars of it, as you want, in a heavy-bottomed stainless-steel pan, (about 3 or 4 will do) with 500ml of water.


As gently as is possible, melt all the butter, until it is a clear liquid floating on the water.
Do NOT stir, do NOT allow the mixture to boil. Avoid, if you can, any bubbling, although a little bit once the butter is melted, is ok.
Turn off the heat, and allow the butter to cool and solidify. Once cold and solid, try to make some room in the fridge and store it over night.

In the morning, take an apple corer and make a hole right at the edge, where the butter meets the pan. Pierce the butter to make another hole, just about opposite (this is to let air in, as you pour the water out....).

Give the pan a gentle swill, and then pour the water away.
You will see that the water is milky/cloudy.
Those are the milk solids being separated from the butter oil.

Through the hole you have made, pour another 500ml of water.
Repeat the above process two more times, until the water you pour off is completely clear. (That's 3 times in all)

The last times you do this, put the pan, with the solid cake of butter in it, on the stove, and heat on a low heat. No water this time though! (4th time of heating).

Bring the butter up to a simmer, and let it popple on the stove. Skim off any surface froth that might form and stay there, and simmer it for around 15 minutes.

Pour into clean, sterilised glass jars. Close immediately. Allow to cool on the side, then store in the fridge.

Will keep for at least 2 years.
This ghee has an extremely high burning point, (unlike butter) so it's very good for gently frying or sautéeing all manner of foods.
Butter begins to burn very quickly, because of the milk solids. That's what burns when butter starts going brown in your pan.

And yes - you CAN use it for cake-making.

Footnotes:
I sterilise my jars by washing them carefully, then pouring boiling water in them (one-third full) and putting them in a microwave for 1 minute.
Remove them with oven gloves, pour off the water, and stand on a plate. Make sure they are completely dry when you pour the butter in though. Use a clean kitchen paper towel.

Sterilise the lids by placing in a dish, and pouring boiling water on them and leaving them for a minute. Remove, shake off, dry the inside with a clean kitchen paper towel.

I know it's a lengthy process, but it works well, is worth it, and the ghee is extremely nutritious. Make enough and it will last you a good, long time.

:namaste:
:namaste:

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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby seeker242 » Wed Apr 30, 2014 11:03 am

Korean Kimchi! Considered by some to be one of the world's healthiest foods. http://grainsandmore.com/2013/04/amazin ... of-kimchi/ :smile:

I use this recipe. It turns out good! The flavor changes depending on how long it's fermented for and at what temperatures. It has a fairly unique taste. I usually ferment it for about a week in the refrigerator. The way the local Korean people prepare it is much more elaborate.

http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2012 ... ecipe.html
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Wed Apr 30, 2014 1:50 pm

Oh goodness.... Yes. I have a fridgeful of the stuff. I make that too... :embarassed:

I am a chef, you see.....

edit note:
And yes, you are correct; there are as many ways of combining ingredients for Kimchi, as there are ....people making it!

(Incidentally, I discovered from a very good Korean friend, that the correct pronounciation is 'Ghim-chee' not with a hard 'k' sound...)
:namaste:

You will not be punished FOR your 'emotions'; you will be punished BY your 'emotions'.



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Pay attention, simplify, and (Meditation instruction in a nutshell) "Mind - the Gap."
‘Absit invidia verbo’ - may ill-will be absent from the word. And mindful of that, if I don't respond, this may be why....
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Thu Jun 05, 2014 8:19 pm

I made this today: it is so good!


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Dukkah (pronounced DOO-kah), is an Egyptian spice blend of toasted nuts and seeds. The warm, aromatic mixture is addictive when served as a dip with bread and olive oil. Sprinkle it onto roasted vegetables, pasta, feta cheese, and even peaches. It can also be used as a crust for lamb, chicken, and fish. For vegetarians, using it on tofu is another possibility.

Dukkah is easy to make at home. Freshly toasted nuts and seeds taste better, and it can be fun to experiment with different ingredients.
There are countless recipes for dukkah. Just about every mixture includes nuts (most often hazelnuts, but various other kinds may be used alone or in combination), sesame seeds, coriander, and cumin. You could even add dried thyme, mint, peppercorns, or various other sweet, hot, and savoury herbs and spices. Below, is the basic recipe to get you started and then I've added suggestions for other ingredients and proportions, depending on your personal preference and intended use. Experiment!!

Basic Ingredients
• Nuts – hazelnuts, almonds, brazil nuts*, pistachios, cashews, pine nuts, macadamia nuts*
• Sesame seeds
• Coriander
• Cumin

Optional Additions
• Dried chickpeas
• Dried herbs – marjoram, mint, thyme
• Dried lemon/orange zest
• Hot pepper – red pepper flakes, chili powder
• Pepper – normal, or sezchuan
• Salt
• Seeds – caraway, fennel, nigella
• Spices – cinnamon, clove, turmeric, star anise, nutmeg
• Sugar

Dukkah (Basic Recipe)
Makes around 2 & 1/2 cups

1 cup nuts(single type, or mixed)
1/2 cup sesame seeds
1/2 cup linseeds
1/2 cup coriander seeds
1/4 cup cumin seeds
1 teaspoon sea salt
Freshly ground black pepper

Method:
Using a good, heavy-based non-stick pan, or good cast-iron skillet, toast nuts and seeds in separate batches. Let them cool completely.
(If you use linseeds, be careful - they explode and you will find them behaving like tiny, harmless little projectiles, leaping all over your kitchen! Use a frying 'splash-guard, roast them on their own, and shake the pan, to stop them from burning or roasting unevenly!)

Combine all ingredients in a food processor and pulse. The mixture may fine or coarse, depending on personal preference, but be sure it is dry and crumbly.

Over-mixing will turn it into a paste, particularly if you use nuts *which contain a high level of oil. I always find it’s best to grind each ingredient separately; that way I can tell that it’s been ground to the desired consistency. Put everything together, and the texture won’t be under your control, so much…
(If you prefer, you could also use a mortar and pestle or spice grinder.)
Store in an airtight container in the refrigerator.
:namaste:

You will not be punished FOR your 'emotions'; you will be punished BY your 'emotions'.



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Pay attention, simplify, and (Meditation instruction in a nutshell) "Mind - the Gap."
‘Absit invidia verbo’ - may ill-will be absent from the word. And mindful of that, if I don't respond, this may be why....
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby Sam Vara » Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:25 pm

Put everything together, and the texture won’t be under your control, so much…


So it's fabricated, and not under our control, which is why it's Dukkah?

(Come on, don't pretend you weren't expecting this or similar...)
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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Thu Jun 05, 2014 10:28 pm

That's why I posted it here... I thought it was quite funny....
A melange of spice, bland, hot, sweet, pungent and flavoursome. there's so much for everyone, and no two samples are the same!
:namaste:

You will not be punished FOR your 'emotions'; you will be punished BY your 'emotions'.



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Re: Healthy recipes

Postby TheNoBSBuddhist » Mon Jul 14, 2014 10:05 am

Warming Winter Lentil & Chickpea soup.

This is an inexpensive, nutritious and delicious soup. You can purchase all the ingredients at any supermarket, and using own-brand or "everyday value" items keeps the cost down considerably.

Ingredients:
half a cup of dried soup mix (this should contain barley, lentils, dried beans and other pulses good for stews or soups.)
1 medium carrot
2 sticks celery
one medium onion
small clove of garlic.
1 tablespoon of vegetable oil
1 cubed potato
2 tins of chickpeas, drained
1 tin of green lentils, drained
1 tbsp tomato puree
vegetable stock cube
water.
seasoning.

Method:
Put the dried soup mix in a bowl, rinse under clear water, and then allow to soak for 24 hours.
Once soaked, rinse again, put in a pan of cold water, bring to the boil, and simmer for 20 minutes.

In the meantime,
Chop the carrot, celery and onion finely. Smash the garlic clove and also chop.
Heat up the oil in a saucepan.
add the chopped vegetables, and sweat until translucent.
Ad the diced potato and stir well, to incorporate and cover completely with oil.
Cook until the potato starts to glaze at the edges.

Add the drained tin of lentils, and one of the tins of chickpeas.
stir well.
Cover with cold water to about an inch above the ingredients, add the stock cube (crumbled) and the tomato puree.

Allow to cook on a good simmer, for around a half-hour.
Drain the soup mix, and add to the soup. Continue cooking for another quarter of an hour.
Turn off the soup and allow it to cool slightly.

Put it in a food processor or blender, bit by bit, and whizz until creamy.
The last portion you whizz, add half of the remaining tin of chickpeas, and whizz again, briefly, to break up the chickpeas.
Once all the soup has been done, add the remaining half-tin of chickpeas, and stir well, combining everything.
Season to taste.

Serve with warm bread or crusty rolls.

I find if I need to heat the soup, even after having just whizzed it, it's better to lower the saucepan into a bigger pan (maybe a deep frying- pan), which contains boiling water (be careful that it's not so full that it overflows). Keep this on a rolling simmer, and heat the soup up, in its saucepan, in this bigger pan.
Putting the soup pan directly on the heat causes the thickened soup to stick. By warming it in what is effectively a stove-top 'bain-Marie', prevents the soup from sticking. It also keeps it warmer for longer.
:namaste:

You will not be punished FOR your 'emotions'; you will be punished BY your 'emotions'.



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