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Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna - Dhamma Wheel

Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

A forum for beginners and members of other Buddhist traditions to ask questions about Theravāda (The Way of the Elders). Responses require moderator approval before they are visible.
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christopher:::
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Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby christopher::: » Mon Aug 31, 2009 7:23 pm

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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Jechbi
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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby Jechbi » Mon Aug 31, 2009 9:01 pm


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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby christopher::: » Mon Aug 31, 2009 10:02 pm

hi Jechbi, i didnt mean it as something to worry about other then for oneself, to be aware of... recognizing that one may have wisdom in some areas, yet need to focus on others. Put in a bit more practice time where we may have weakness or not yet grasp something experientially...

:smile:
"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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Jechbi
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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby Jechbi » Mon Aug 31, 2009 11:01 pm

That makes sense. :)

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chicka-Dee
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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby chicka-Dee » Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:59 am

Hi Chris,

I took a class this spring based on Phillip Moffitt's book: "Dancing With Life: Buddhist Insights for Finding Meaning and Joy in the Face of Suffering".

The book examines the 4 Noble Truths within the context of the 12 insights of the Buddha.. basically each of the Noble Truths is examined in the 3 insights, which sound very similar to the 3 types of understanding outlined above.

The first insight is an intellectual examination / understanding of the (external) teaching; the second is an ongoing examination from personal experience of what was determined in the first insight (and so a further intellectual understanding that comes internally from personal examination of one's experiences); and the third is a "knowing that you know" (the most difficult insight to attain).

Moffitt says the following about the third insight:

"You have also seen that your untrained mind with its endless stream of reactionary thoughts is unreliable. There is a reliable ground on which to stand to meet life that is your own awareness knowing itself. It is this ground of "knowing you know" that creates the steady, nonreactive state of mind that allows you to just be with life as it is.

A deep acceptance of life "just as it is" allows you to be more fully present in your life moment by moment, no matter how difficult or how sweet it is, and it empowers you to act more from your deepest values. Regardless of the circumstances of your life at any given time, your experience is richer, more alive. What's more, being with the dukkha opens you to an ever-deepening exploration of the inner life, eventually leading to what the Buddha calls "the deathless", which we will explore in the Third Noble Truth."

from page 66

I thought this would fit in nicely with the material you've presented here.

Dee :namaste:

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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby appicchato » Tue Sep 01, 2009 2:21 am


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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby Dmytro » Tue Sep 01, 2009 5:44 am



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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby christopher::: » Tue Sep 01, 2009 5:50 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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zavk
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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby zavk » Tue Sep 01, 2009 7:33 am

Hi Chris and friends,

I'm not familiar with Moffitt's work but it does seem like he is referring to the same thing.

I too am a student of the Goenka approach to meditation. From my observation of and interaction with other Buddhists both online and offline, it does seem to me that it is as you suggest Chris, that some people 'have different levels of wisdom in different areas of their practice'.

What Goenka is emphasising here is that only bhavana-maya panna can lead to liberation. He is using the word 'bhavana' here in a very specific sense: 'development by means of mental cultivation'. He is referring specifically to formal, seated meditation.

But personally for me, I would (on the basis of my own experience and observation/interaction with both Buddhist teachers and students online and offline) think of bhavana-maya panna in a broader sense, such that it is cultivated not only in formal, seated meditation but also in the everyday actions of mind, speech and body.

I'd like to suggest that bhavana-maya panna (or what we are calling here in English as 'experiential wisdom')is cultivated during those times when, for example, we choose to respond with friendliness when the girl at the checkout greets us with a snarl rather than a smile, or when we choose to keep our cool when someone cuts into our lane on the road, or when we choose to remain gracious when locked in a heated debate on the Internet. Experiential wisdom, I would suggest, takes root in the everyday.

In offering this broader view of experiential wisdom, I am not being careless with the traditional understanding of 'bhavana'. For as my teacher Goenka would also say, right mental cultivation must be accompanied by right action, speech, and thought--or in a word, sila. The loss and gain, the pleasure and pain, of day-to-day life is the furnace where sila is forged. And moreover right conduct is guided by what we learn from others and what we come to understand through reflection and contemplation: suta-maya panna and cinta-maya panna.

I suppose what I'm trying to say (in a somewhat long-winded fashion) is that to cultivate experiential wisdom we should perhaps not see suta-maya panna, cinta-maya panna, and bhavana panna as separate but as dependently originated.

I am not a Tibetan Buddhist practitioner but I really like this quote from the Tibetan saint Dromtönpa, ''When I study I also apply contemplation and meditation. When I engage in contemplation I maintain the practices of study and meditation. And when I meditate I continue to study and contemplate.'
With metta,
zavk

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christopher:::
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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby christopher::: » Tue Sep 01, 2009 9:32 am

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009

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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby Ben » Tue Sep 01, 2009 12:52 pm

“No lists of things to be done. The day providential to itself. The hour. There is no later. This is later. All things of grace and beauty such that one holds them to one's heart have a common provenance in pain. Their birth in grief and ashes.”
- Cormac McCarthy, The Road

Learn this from the waters:
in mountain clefts and chasms,
loud gush the streamlets,
but great rivers flow silently.
- Sutta Nipata 3.725

(Buddhist aid in Myanmar) • •

e: [email protected]..

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chicka-Dee
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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby chicka-Dee » Tue Sep 01, 2009 1:19 pm


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christopher:::
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Re: Experiential Wisdom: Bhavana-maya panna

Postby christopher::: » Tue Sep 01, 2009 7:52 pm

"As Buddhists, we should aim to develop relationships that are not predominated by grasping and clinging. Our relationships should be characterised by the brahmaviharas of metta (loving kindness), mudita (sympathetic joy), karuna (compassion), and upekkha (equanimity)."
~post by Ben, Jul 02, 2009


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